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FullTilt

Trout Fishing Newbie

5 posts in this topic

Here's the deal, the original plan was to take the family camping near Lanesboro and do some biking (rather than our typical fishing/camping). Then the whole trout fishing deal dawned on me and I thought it might be a good time, but I've never fished for trout let alone from a stream.

We're camping at the HWY 250 campground just outside Lanesboro on the Root River. Is it possible to catch trout from this area and if so what's a good approach to start with?

I'm bringing a light spinning rig with 4Lb fluorcarbon. Should I be casting or bobber fishing? Can I put a worm on a hook with a sinker and just throw it out there like cat fishing from the bank? I noticed that minnows are illegal and there are some slot considerations in different places, but is bait used at all?

I could really use some guidance so thanks in advance for any advice you might be willing to share.

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The 1st thing you'll want to do is buy yourself and anyone in your group over 16 a trout stamp ($10). While buying your stamp, ask for the DNR publication: Trout Fishing Access in SE MN (or something similar to this title). The book/magazize has 23 maps or so of all the designated trout water in SE MN. Some of these streams have special regulations where no live bait is allowed, others have slot limits, and some have both. There are many streams near Lanesboro that hold great numbers of trout. The Lt to Med-Lt rod with 4 lb test is perfectly suited for spin fishing, live bait or hardware. Good luck and don'r forget the camera.

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i grew up fishing ponds and gravel pits and the main thing that trout fishing the se mn streams taught me, is how to understand current. it won't take long to realize that the active trout are in some degree of current. for this reason, casting and reeling is a good method. if you do choose live bait, the way to do it is use as little weight as you can get away with and let the worm drift with the current. for artificials, small spinners and raps up to 2-3"

there are some fine trouters on this site, they caould give ya more info than i cool.gif

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Thanks, that gives me a step in the right direction.

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FullTilt, if your going to be down in that area next saturday May 5th bring the family over to Trout Day. We'll have both spin and fly fisherman people on hand that can answer all the questions about trout you can think of. We'll even take you out on the stream to give you a even better idea of what trout fishing is all about.

We'll also be giving away free tackle, maps of S.E. and N.E. Minnesota trout streams and more. The entire event is FREE.

Click on the link below for more info about the event or just post here and I'll answer all your questions.

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