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xHCxOutdoorsman

I Don't Know Anything About Fly Fishing

9 posts in this topic

I am just starting to get in to it this summer i want to do alot but i dont know anything about flys or which way i should set up my rod and or line i want to catch some trout out of state this summer so if you guys could lend a hand that would be great thanks a ton

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The first thing to do is to get good information. There are plenty of books on the subject.

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Books, online info, local fly shop.....these are all great sources of information. I think the most useful (for me) was to fish with people who new what they were doing. I have learned a lot by getting out on the water with friends, and they have picked up some things from me as well.

Where are you planning on catching trout out of state?

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Check out the book "Fly Fishing for beginners" by Chris Hansen. This was a big help for me when I was just starting out. Also, go to either Cabela's, Sportsman's Warehouse, or (where I reccomend) The Fly Angler which is right next to Thorne Bros. The guys at The Fly Angler really know their stuff and will be able to answer all of your questions.

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I'd second and third what everyone has been saying. Books are VERY, VERY helpful...But, sometimes, you just need someone to show you. Take a casting class so someone can critique your casting. You'll never really know all your problems till you have someone watch you and tell you. Take your time to learn each faction...but HAVE FUN! We forget to have fun sometimes when we're trying to perfect our dangling roll cast. I started not too long ago and have picked up a wealth of knowledge here. Just search, ask, and update us. I'd love to help anyway I can but like what most asked me.....what type of fish were you going for? grin.gif It all starts with this!

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There can be a lot of information to learn and the potential selection of fly's one can use is daunting. The trick is to keep things to a dull roar and develop some confidence fishing a few paterns. Books and the odd video are a good place to learn. Cabela's has a fairly innexpensive video that covers casting fairly well. It's still a very good idea to seek out help with your casting, take a lesson if you can. As for general books I like the "Curtis Creek Manifesto" and "Joe Humphrey's Trout Tactics". For SE Minnesota and Western Wisconsin specific info I like "Trout Fishing in Southeast Minnesota" and "Trout Streams of Wisconsin and Minnesota".

So what do you need to know? You'll need to learn to cast. You'll need to learn about leaders and how they are used to turn over fly's and how they help you fish. To be effective you need to learn how to select the proper leader for the fishing you're doing and how to modify it for a given situation. The more I learn about fly fishing the more I've come to appreciate the role that the leader plays. You'll need to learn a few knots. If you fish you probably know a few of the knots already; clinch knot, uni-knot, and perfection loop are used and you may know them already. Some other knots that you will need to learn are the surgeons knot, nail knot, blood knot, and albright knot. So start practicing !

You mentioned trout so that limits the universe of stuff down a great deal. Work with your local fly shop to put together a small collection of decent gear that will work for the species you're going after. If you work closely with a fly shop, they should be able to suggest some fly's that will work for the specific streams your fishing and the time of year. Adding what you need when you need it will keep your fly collection down to a something that's reasonable to manage and will give you the time to learn what the fly's are, how they're used, what they immitate, and when they're usefull. Some are usefull all year, some only during specific seasons. If you travel outside your home area then hit a local fly shop at your destination and have them scrutinize your fly box. The information you receive when you buy a dozen flies is definiately worth the $20 you spent on the flies. Over time you will get the flies figured out and develop a system that works for you. Then you can handle having hundreds (or thousands) of flies in your various fly boxes and they'll make sense.

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If you're in the metro area, there are three fly shops scattered across the region. There's the Fly Angler in Fridley, as mentioned, there's Bob Mitchell's Fly Shop in Lake Elmo and there's Bentley's Outfitters in Bloomington. Any or all of the three can help you tremendously. There are books and videos to help you with your casting and bug knowledge. A Trout Unlimited meeting is a great place to meet people who will be willing to help you, too. Good luck.

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Yes sir, a mentor is a good thing although it would be said that you learn some of your mentors “habits” so books (like everyone else has mentioned) are also quite invaluable. My personal opinion is that the L.L.Bean Deluxe Fly Fishing Book is heads and tails above the rest.

I never had a mentor to speak of and used that book and it has helped me immensely. Fly shops are also good advice, as you can usually find someone in there that can help you with certain things, like casting issues, or knots and even about bugs.

Beyond that, everyone else has offered some pretty good advice already.

Good luck, it’s a wonderful adventure.

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i second the l.l. bean book. i have l.l. bean "ultimate guide to fly fishing" and orvis "fly fishing guide". i thought myself to fly fish with them.

if i were you i would deffinately go to a fly shop or if your ever around the new gander mountain in eden prairie talk to Randy, he'll get you setup good or the guys over at bentley's

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