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JIG / LINDY FISHING ROD

7 posts in this topic

ARE THE NAME BRANDS WORTH THEIR PRICE. SUCH AS THE GLX, IMX WALLEYE RODS. EVERY STORE TELLS YOU SOMETHING DIFERENT!

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I'm no expert and I rarely use bait or a lindy rig. Pretty much just a jig fisherman. I usually throw 1/4 oz. jigs. I like a 6 1/2' rod with good backbone but flexable enough for a good feel. IF I had a good amount of money to spend on a rod I probably would go high end. Being I'm poor I go the cheaper route. My favorite is a generic cheapo I paid $20 for. If you are handy, building your own can be a good route to go to get a quality rod at half the price.

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I, too, have no money tree in the back yard. I do a lot of lindy rigging. I'm big on Quantum rods and reels, very good quality at a medium to higher end price structure, but really brand isn't that important. All the big name companies make a good assortment of equiptment. What I like is a rod with a a medium action with a little softer tip. The softer tip allows me to feel the bite without letting the fish feel me. The most important thing is get as long a rod (lindy rigging: 7' or so)as you can with the other features you want. The reason I value length is your line goes down to the sinker and then back to the bait, kind of like an "L" where the corner of the "L" is where your sinker is. When you set the hook, you need to pull that slack out and get the sinker up in a straight line from the rod tip to the hook. A long sweeping hookset opposed to a short hard set straightens out the line and results in a higher hooking percentage. The longer rod gives you this advantage.

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I bought a Fenwick, a cheaper one, in a medium light and i like it a lot, team it with a mitchell real, very nice.

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I would have to agree with the fenwicks... depending on how much you want to spend... Fenwicks are pretty good all around rods for jigging and live bait.. Medium light is my favorite too.. but I'd buy a shimano reel for mine..

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I use G Loomis rods for walleye fishing, and I've used others, Fenwick's, St. Croix's, Bass Pro, Quantums, etc... And I'll tell you they are the best. It's not gonna make you a better fisherman, but it will make the exprience a lot easier.

I have a 7 foot live bait rig rod, that is also great for bobber fishing too. It picks up a lot of line. I bought it over ten years ago, and it still works as good as it did the day I bought it. It's got a soft tip, and a tough backbone. It's perfect. G Looomis makes the perfect live bait rig rods.

I have a 6 foot jig rod from G Loomis as well. I think you could go a cheaper route with a jig rod. As long as it's not too long, has great sensativity and is pretty stiff you're good. I love my G though.

Plus, they have lifetime gaurantees. Once you buy one you'll never pay full price again.

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I Use some Fenwick, some St Croix, Compre Muskie rods, Scheels Outfitters Tourney series. Different rod for different application is what I say. I usually purchase one per year for different reasons or another. everything from ultra light to moster muskie. I have mostly spinning but some trolling rigs and some bait caster rigs. I prefer a nice medium fast rod for jigging. A medium slow for rigging and trolling, and medium fast for crank casting. I like crowbar style bend when fishing for freswater alligators (musky). Not everyone likes to waste money like I do (not that is has ever done me any good yet) but I would say if you have one maybe 2 really nice quailty rods then maybe a dumpy back up you should be ok.

Just remember the average cost of walleyes is $595/pound when you catch them yourself.

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