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OrionsX0

Deerstands

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OrionsX0    0
OrionsX0

Does anyone have any good plans on how to build a stand that they would like to share??

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Powerstroke    20
Powerstroke

What style of stand are you interested in building? What is the terrain like that you plan on hunting?

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OrionsX0    0
OrionsX0

I would like to build a box stand and it is kind of rough ground any and all help would be great

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harvey lee    13
harvey lee

I use steel legs on mine and if the ground is rough that is fine. I take a post hole digger and cut the four holes approx 4ft deep and then place the stand into the holes and cement them in place. I also would run guy wires if the stand is real tall to help stabilize it. I have never had a problem with a stand moving in the wind when I want to shoot. Mine are approx 4' wide and 6-7 ft long. Windows on all four sides. Dont forget to carpet the floor to help reduce sound and echo's when moving around inside. I also paint them up camo to match the fall foliage and also shingle the top. The main floor base we use steel and then install 3/4" green treated plywood for the floor. If I remember correctly I believe each stand runs approx 400-500 for materials. If you can find some used lumber and steel you could save a ton.

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tealitup    1
tealitup

Harvey - would you happen to have written plans of some sort - I am kinda non-mechanically inclinded smile.gif

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BLACKJACK    3
BLACKJACK

Here is description from a previous post that I had describing my stands:

Hint, look for 'cull' treated lumber at your local lumber yard.

I just built a ladder stand last Sunday during Sid time, it took me about 3 hours. Start with (2) 2x6x12', cut (12) 2x4x24" pieces for the rungs, attach those on the end grain of the 2x6's. Now you have a 12 foot ladder. I use one foot spacings on the rungs, when you have bulky clothes and boots on, I hate steps that are too far apart. Now cut (2) 2x6x4' pieces, these are the start of the platform, attach them to the top of the ladder on the outside at about 110 degree angle (you want greater than 90 degrees because it makes it easier to lean against a tree). Now cut (6-8) 2x4x32" boards for the platform deck, attach them leaving a 1/4 inch gap inbetween each. Cut (2) angle braces 2x4x48", attach between the platform and the ladder, this supports the platform. I've used deck screws to attach everything so far, but I like to strengthen every thing by putting 3/8 carriage bolts thru the 1) connection of the ladder and platform 2) where the angle braces are attached. I also take 3/8 inch lags and put two in each ladder rung, 10 years from now I don't want one of those rungs coming loose on a cold winter morning. It may seem like overkill, but I use treated lumber, I want the hardware to last also. I just watch for the bag sale at Menards and stock up on lag screws and carriage bolts.

This is the basic pattern. You can go heavier or lighter, I sometime use 4x4 for the ladder legs, or taller, I've went as high as 16 feet, but then they're harder to carry and put up, unless you have a tractor and loader like I do.

One more step is to add pieces of a rubber inner tube to the last platform section so it doesn't squeek when its rubbing against a tree.

This whole stand was light enought where I climbed inside the ladder and carried it out of my shop by myself.

I don't put sides on my deerstands, I mostly bowhunt, for the close shots you get while bowhunting, sides would impede your shot. Plus I always use a safty harness, so I feel no need for sides.

Now just find a good tree, lean it up against it and tie it off. Rope works lots better than chain, chain you can't get tight enough. Then once I get it tied in, I make a seat out of one verticle 2x4 and a 2x8 seat. If you lean it against a crooked tree, make sure its on the side or upside of the lean, if its on the downside, it will eventually wreck the stand, been there done that.

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harvey lee    13
harvey lee

tealitup

Given I have some extra time this next week, I will sit down and write up what I can on building the type I use. You could also probably google deerstand construction and come up with some other options.

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UMDSportsman    0
UMDSportsman

Blackjack- something else you can do to make sure your rungs are there in 10 years is to rip a 2x4 into a 2x2 and nail/screw it onto the 2x6 inbetween the rungs. be sure they are touching. my dad always did this and i always wondered why until a year ago. He is a carpenter(now job supt.) for a comercial construction company in the cities, and i also work for them in the summer. I learned that this is a safety requirement for temporary ladders on job sites. thinking about it, it will also limit the shearing on the nails/screws. also, personally, i would use nails in the rungs instead of skrews, nails are stronger when a shear load is applied. if you use the spacers like i described above this becomes less of an issue.

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BLACKJACK    3
BLACKJACK

I've seen ladders with those connecting 2x2's between the rungs and wondered about that. Thanks for the advice!

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lawdog    0
lawdog

On the ladder stands I've built, I went away from using 2*4's for the steps as I don't like climbing on them. Find a good hardwood closet hanger bar and a hole saw or hole boring wood bit the same size and pass the bar through the 2*4 or 2*6 outside frame. Then put a screw into the bar from the front or back to hold in place. The beauty of this is they are nice to climb and grab onto and its also the wood itself that is holding you, not a screw or nail... IF you don't make the ladder too wide, they are VERY strong too.

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Mark Christianson    0
Mark Christianson

If stilt stands is what you want, here is how we build all of ours.

I dont have the dimensions handy. If anyone is interested, I can measure it up next time I am up.

They are not anchored in the ground except for digging down the legs to get it level. Not one has ever toppled in a wind storm. Although, I am planning on sinking a Tpost on each corner and tie it in for insurance. But they have proven to be very solid and sturdy.

Very simple, and very cheap to build from cull/scrap lumber. None of our stands have any new wood.

stiltstandpic1smallsb8.jpg

stiltstandpic2smallpl5.jpg

stiltstandpic3smalldu8.jpg

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OrionsX0    0
OrionsX0

BigLake taht would be great if you would get some measurements on that type of stand Thank everyone for there information

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Mark Christianson    0
Mark Christianson

It'll be a week or two or three, but I'll post em on this when I get them.

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OrionsX0    0
OrionsX0

Tank you and I was wondering about some food plot seed when will it be Available and where would a person pick it up smile.gif

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Mark Christianson    0
Mark Christianson

Send me an email if you want some seed. I am getting another order in a couple weeks. After that its done for the year. Get it in Big Lake. Not too far for ya.

mchristi@brocade.com

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