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eyes54

Rookie Help

9 posts in this topic

Hi I am making my first trip to rainy river at the end of march. I was wodering what presentations work the best on the river. It seems that jigs and minnows are the way to go, but how do you put it their face? Do you drift the river, or throw down your anchor, or troll against the current or anything else I might be missing? Also do you recomend getting a canadian license so we can fish both sides of the river or are there pleny of options just on the Minn. side? Were staying at the Royal Dutchmen, I would reccomend him to everyone, Doug is a heck of guy and he real helpful. Thanks for any help you can give me.

P.s Doug if your reading this I am with the group that came up in Dec. and lost the dog. Couting down the days to come up and catch those big eyes!!!

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Usually it's jig, jig, jig for most folks. Some folks troll cranks, others spinners, and some drift or anchor and fish rigs.

Some anchor, others will drift with their jigs, still others will snap jig while moving slowly upstream or down. I usually like to slip along downstream with the electric and match the current speed to keep the jig nice and vertical while working our way down the structure/area, then pull back upstream and do it again.

Broad range of options on jigging presentations I know but the fish will usually let you know what they want.

If you want to do Canada side you'd maybe be best crossing via vehicle and launching on that side. Crossing from US to Canada requires permits and redtape and I don't think it'd be worth the bother. Loads of fish and fishing spots on the S side of the river. If you launch on the Canada side you won't have the boat ramp crowds so that'd be a benefit anyways.

Fish the US side as early as you can, and during the week if you can and the river is'nt so tonned up with all them touristas we see once it's kicked into high gear and the ramps are good to go.

fiskyknut

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Be prepared to wait. Be patient and understand. Run your boat at home ahead of time- too many folks sit at the landing trying to get it to turn over as we all watch the motor smoke like an arson fire once it finally pops. Charge your batteries ahead of time. Bring rope. Long rope. Once you land get, out of the way. Your rope will aid you here!

Bring a bicycle with a lock. You most likely will park 1/2 mile or more away. You may even park on the highway which is a long ways away! Be there by 7 am or wait until after 10 am. 2 years ago, we "slightly over slept" and ended up #32 in line. We waited 1.5 hours to launch. Once we parked, the line was only 5 or so long. This year, we will sleep in again.

Imagine the 1/2 way and cut another 50 feet more from what you feel is the line STAY on the US Side. The queen is very patiently waiting to get to know you better.... trust me from experience!!!!

Bring a camera and a ruler.

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Fisky is right on with his directions. One year we did buy Canada Licenses and fished off of a Canadian access to avoid the remoter border crossing permit you need when launching in MN and it was great... We were the only ones there and had to only run 1 mile to our "hotspot". The one thing that is wrong with that plan though is they don't have any crews preparing the access and with our usual quick thaws we've been seeing lately, I don't think you could launch most larger boats from there. We had to hoist my 16 footer over about a 4.5 foot ice ledge to the trailer. One of the times I was glad I didn't own a Warrior. But really I'd like to own one in addition to my camo duck/walleye killer.

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We usually bring the grill and make breakfast during the wait.It is a good way to pass the time and you should see the looks you get from the people who skipped breakfast to get in early. grin.gif

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What weight jigs do you usually use when fishing the river?

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1/4 oz til the creeks and rivers open up,then it could take up to 1 oz to jig with the anchor down and less when you slip the current.

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Most years I don't touch anything other than a 1/4 oz or 3/8 oz.

This year with the low flows I'm thinking the 1/4 will be my heavy one. I might even grab a few of my 1/8 ozs.

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Hey eyes54,

Watching the reunion with Tobie (the dog) & Jeremiah was one of the coolest things I've ever seen! I think they both were cryin'. Can't believe he was still alive after 3 nights of sub-zero on the lake.

You've gotten some good advice from the guys. I prefer to match the current and keep the line as vertical as posible yet maintaining contact with the bottom is critical. Strike zone is bottom 4-6". I did learn a lot about fish behavior last fall from using my Marcum for the first time.

I have trouble keeping anything lighter than 3/8 on the bottom and really see no advantage to going lighter.

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