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Cooter

Planting beans in the woods

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Howdy - I have a little food plot on a ridge top in some oak hardwoods. I've had success with brassicas and winter rye there and am thinking of planting soybeans or something like lab-lab or cowpeas or burgandy beans, etc. How are these with limited sunshine? What time of spring to plant? Looking for an early bowseason honey hole wink.gif Thanks, later.

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i spread some soybeans in some shady areas just throwing them out and letting rain let them germinate. I did it in July when we finally got rain and the grass actually held the moisture in. Dang farmer let the cows in that area and the got a hell of a meal. Don't know about the beans your thinking but I just used soybeans and they actually grew taller then I thought and the internodes were long as heck because they were competing with the grass for sunlight...but the grass kept dew in for the day.

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Would you be competing with farmers bean fields around you though? Not sure if it would matter or not but if there are already bean fields around anyway, what would the draw be to a bean food plot...I would maybe lean more towards a plant that would possibly be more desireable and maybe more likely to hold deer over other areas...just a thought though. But if you are not in farm country, you're right, a bean plot might be paydirt! Not sure on the sunlight deal. Maybe put a mixture of beans and something else down?

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I'm in farm country but there aren't many bean fields in that area. Plus, this plot is secluded. Clover is the other option - but I'm concerned about all the oak leaves dropping every year. Think I'll stick with annuals.

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Dont be too afraid of leaves dropping on clover.

I have a plot dead smack in the middle of oaks that is about 20 yds wide and 40 to 50 yds long. Got a pretty heavy canopy overhead.

I had it half clover and half annual until 2 years ago.

here is a pic of it in mid to late April I believe. Notice the matted oak leaves. The bottom half is where I tilled and later planted it in clover as well. This plot has been smokin good for me honestly.

The deer flock to the clover as soon as the snows melt. I kinda like having something that the deer seem to like after a long hard winter. Well, if we had long winters...

Regardless, I am very fond of clover in the woods.

czplotmay20051Medium.jpg

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Thanks, might have to give it a try. I've limed it for the past 3 years. We also have a 3 acre section reserved for deer and maybe that is the place for the beans. I just know that bucks hammer beans around the archery opener and thought it might be the ticket because its secluded, set up for the wind, easy to sneak into, and small enough that if one shows up he's in range. Decisions, decisions.

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Overgrazing would be the only concern I would have. Deer will demolish the plants if it is a small plot. Late season rye is by far my best plot in farm country! Good luck! PS, round up ready is the way to go if you decide on beans!

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Another question - could you plant beans and clover together or would the beans shade out the clover later in the year? Also, are there many options for annual clovers?

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Do you want to plant beans again the following year?

If so, you are gonna have to till up the clover to plant the beans again.

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Replant beans - see how things go this year. Also, thats why I was asking about annual clover.

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