Guests - If You want access to member only forums on FM. You will gain access only when you Sign-in or Sign-Up on Fishing Minnesota.

It's easy - LOOK UPPER right menu.

Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Try Too Fish

Pheasants could use a little help!

33 posts in this topic

Just A Reminder!

If you are in an area where there was very heavy snow. The pheasants are going too have a very tough time finding food.

Take some corn too your favorite hunting spot,find a spot as high, bare, and some distance from the road as you can. and dump it!

We dont want too lose our breeding stock this late in the winter!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That would really help the birds and wildlife until the snow cover is less. I took a little ride around the country side to see how many birds were out after the storm looking to feed. Maybe bad luck but I didnt see a bird and I drove around spots that I normally would.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The ole girl likes to see pheasants in the yard,We buy a few bushels every year.This morn 11 hens roaming the yard for breakfast!No roosters yet see them across the road though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tom,

I took a drive on CR 15 by the Severence lake landing yesterday about 4PM and kept driving past to the west. I counted over 100 pheasants. It was a happy site to see that that many survived. I had some corn left in the back of the truck just for this specific occations for after the storm. The birds were so hungry that when I stopped to get out and throw corn in the ditch only a few flew away. The rest ran a further distance away. When I headed back down the road to where I had left piles of corn in the ditch the birds were already feeding on the corn.........that's how hungry they were. I'm stopping at the crib today afer work and grabbing more corn. Guys get out and throw a little corn out near good cover if you can. You'd be amazed at how little time it takes these birds to find it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The local owl and hawk population will be really glad you did confused.gif

If you really must dump corn - make sure it is fairly near the winter brush / cattail habitat. Pheasants that have to roam near roads or far away from their cover - DIE via avian predators.

The process is slow with one or two dissappearing each day or week until ...........

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When we built and distributed feeders as Habitat Coordinators for McLeod County Pheasants Forever, we also stressed that they were ideally to be placed near cover for those very same reasons. The problem is people want to place them in the open where they can watch wildlife and the only reason we see so many in the open now is this is when they are really struggling to find anything. The longer they are in the elements the less chance they have to survive.

The best feeders are natural hedge rows and standing corn this time of year. We need to plan ahead and create habitat. Its hard to keep up with just shelled corn.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

[Note from admin: edited. Please read forum policy before posting again. Thank you.]

The spot where I was dumping it the birds were already there. The cover was qtr. mile away. How do you stop the birds from eating the gravel off the side of the road then? Your not going to stop the birds from going to those locations this time of yr.I'm a board member for Sibley County PF and have attended many state meetings and am also aware of the feeding strategies. I am trying to help the birds that were out in those spots at the time for now. I have feeders all over the county that I put out near cover so don't worry.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

[Note from admin: edited. Please read forum policy before posting again. Thank you.]

Just because your well aware of feeding strategies and attend meetings, doesn't mean everyone out there gets it yet.

If birds are on roads for grit they usually do it quick in the morning or evening. No reason to add feed to that spot though, it just encourages them to linger in the open.

I commend you for helping out on your PF board. I believe that organization does more for MN wildlife than the DNR given equal amounts of money for comparison.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

[Note from admin: edited. Please read forum policy before posting again. Thank you.]

We have some people in our area that goes along and throws cobs of corn on the road!! Great, put it on the road so the birds get hit by cars!! I'm sure he drives along with a bucket of corn in the cab and when he sees some birds, he tosses it out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

[Note from admin: edited. Please read forum policy before posting again. Thank you.]

I like the idea of food plots because the birds are less concentrated. Feeders and dumped bags of food can promote transfer of disease - death by mircoscopic pathogens...

Look at the NW deer heard (now being shot because of the threat of TB). Song birds and sparrows at feeders can die of disease - concentrated pheasants??

I suspect the pheasants you see in winter are the ones that often die. The ones in the right mix of habitat are less likely to be visibly exposed for a long time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The corn wasn't going on the road or in the ditch. I know I stated ditch , but it was on field edges. Anyway the birds were out there scratching in those spots looking for the food anyway. I get what your saying. Food plots are the best answer. If your involved with McCloud you know as well as I do to get farmers to plant food plots today is tuff business even if we make payments to them per acre with the price of corn today. BTW say hi to Virgil V. from me he's a good guy...DUDE!grin.gif

Britt,

are you saying we should stop feeding the birds because of the diseases that will be spread. Our regional biologist from PF tell us to practice for winter feeding wher food plots are not available. I do put 20 some feeders out near (cover).

[Note from admin: edited. Please read forum policy before posting again. Thank you.]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is no great way to feed them! You put by brush then the fox and Coyote sneak up on them. I dont think adult pheasants view hawks as trouble or they would not be out in the wide open feeding on there own. I have personal seen on more than one occasion an adult pheasant avoid being caught by a hawk. I'm sure they get some but that is nature working!

It still gets down too if there is nothing available to eat you will be doing the population a favor by helping!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

[Note from admin: edited. Please read forum policy before posting again. Thank you.]

Luckily I don't live in McLeod County anymore. No more black desert for this guy. Now up here in Northern Crow Wing county we deal with native birds, aka Grouse. I do chase a few chinese ditch parrots occasionally out of obligation for my GSP, but usually I'll treat him to western MN where there's a few around consistantly.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Where ever animals (including humans) group together - pathogens prosper, multiply and infect.

Avian cholera kills many waterfowl. Song birds die at unclean feeders. Biologists now tell everyone NOT to feed deer.

Chicken and turkey (pheasant preserves?) farms typically use a lot of antibiotics to keep their flocks healthy.

I won't argue that the PF biologists recommend the feeders -but I am also curious if any wildlife research team has ever investigated the impact of large groups of pheasants at a feeder. Maybe it is microscopic pathogens killing the birds and not the cold and snow. A sick pheasant can not go to the doctor.

I would like to see my PF dollars go to food plots not feeders. Feeders rank right behing stocking in my book.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Owls are number 1. Hawks a close second. Avian predators take winter pheasants.

Are they the weak and stressed birds - probably. But then those are the ones walking 1/4 mile to scratch corn off the side of the road.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Britt,

We try to push habitat and food plots as much as possible. That is why PF's slogan is "Think Habitat" . As much as I would love to see more habitat and food plots it's never going to happen in Mn. like it does it South Dakota. Farming practices are different and our soil over here is much better than the Dakotas. Big Ag. runs everything. The Gov. needs to set up programs for better environmental tactics for farmers . the way it's set up now there is no way some of these farmers will change their mind when there are so many substities and programs for their cash crop. Switch grass for ethanol may be good that they are looking into, but who knows how that will pan out. It's all about the almighty doller with the farmers. Out Chapter has stress time and time again to our members about food plots. The $ we stick into corn now days is getting ridiculous.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

YES!!! I just posted a similar suggestion on another thread in this same category.

Some of our pheasants greatest threats come from above. That's why they like to hang out in the thickest brush and grass they can find. Putting food out in the open will more likely fatten up the birds for the owls, hawks, and any other overhead threat and they'll love you for it.

Bob

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My brother and other ND farmers have watch flocks of pheasants and partridge (huns) dwindle to nothing as owls have picked them off one by one.

Long time ago .. the owl died. Now days, the birds either need to move on or become food. Feeders are such an easy meal that the birds often abandon other biological self-protection mechanisms

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How could you sit and watch that happen? I know I would never stand by and watch that. I would introduce them to old bessy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In Minnesota owls are protected.

Bob

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Slot... are you saying it's smarter to shoot a federaly protected bird than to lose a flock of pheasants... nature doing her work... If so you'd shoot the owl or hawk so "YOU" have the ability to shoot those same pheasants as opposed to the bird of prey getting them... HMMM.... if that's what you are saying -Ethics at it's finest! I'm sure the DNR would love to hear about your conservation methods in the event Ol Bess is a gun! Maybe throw all the Muskies and Pike up on shore too so you can harvest more fish! Shoot all the Timber wolves so you can shoot more deer...

Good Luck!

Ken

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please, be sure to keep this thread VERY friendly. We want you absolutely sure to stay WELL within forum policy guidelines when posting in this thread.

Please, It's a good topic and we'd like it to stay that way.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Safety in numbers. Lots of eyes looking out for each other helps.

Having food easily available to the birds (dumped) can cut down on their "exposed" time they would spend looking and scratching for food.

But yes, a food plot would be preferred by most.

Want to help?

(Like Doser said) My PF chapter (and others) are looking to pay farmers for food plots ($100-200 per acre). Now is the time to put your name on the list or ask neighbors to put their name on the list. Usual criteria is the food plot be "near good wintering cover" like cattails, etc.

It is a good practice to cut down lone trees to eliminate perches for the owls and hawks in some areas.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Quote:

...But yes, a food plot would be preferred by most.

Want to help?

(Like Doser said) My PF chapter (and others) are looking to pay farmers for food plots ($100-200 per acre). Now is the time to put your name on the list or ask neighbors to put their name on the list. Usual criteria is the food plot be "near good wintering cover" like cattails, etc...


I have use of land I think is perfect for this, and available. It's near Lester Prairie in Mcleod county. I have tried e-mailing the county PF with no answer. Anybody know who to call or write? Thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

website: www mcleodpf org

National: www pheasantsforever org

Aaron Kuehl

Southern MN Regional Wildlife Biologist

111 Beech St. E.

Trimont, MN 56176

507-639-7345 (Ph/Fax)

Thank You!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0



  • Posts

    • kayakfisherman
      Hi guys!  I used to be on this site long ago (participating mostly in the Mille Lacs forum), and the system wouldn't recognize my email.  So I created a new user name.   I'm planning to spend May and June in Ely.  My project is to autochart and create maps of a few small lakes I like off the Echo Trail, which I'll do via my Helix I have mounted on my bright orange fishing kayak.   I don't need any advice, as I pretty much know the area and what works to catch fish.  I'm just looking to possibly connect with other Ely anglers while I'm up there.  I'm tentatively planning on starting next week, assuming the "wintery mix" and wind in the forecast abates.  I'll be paddling around a bunch of different small lakes, going back and forth and back and forth, listening to either WELY or WEVE on my radio.  So if you see me, stop by and say hey.
    • huntnfish
      First off, welcome to the site. The Red River page gets kind of quiet but if you look back at previous posts there's a lot of good info. I've never fished much for cats but when I have I have always used cut up goldeye. I've also heard frogs are good but I have no first hand experience with that.    1- I feel that the fishery in Fargo is excellent and overlooked by a lot of people. The biggest eyes that I've caught have been on the river.  2,3- I normally use a chartreuse twister tail on the river with a jig head. The main reason for the color choice is because that is what I have an abundance of. I've caught them on white and yellow also. I don't use live bait at all unless the kids are along. They're not really able to do much pitch and retrieve yet and the minnows give them a little better chance I feel.  4- the only thing I've used is cut bait so I'd recommend finding some gold eyes or some suckers and chunk them up for bait.  5- last time I looked the ND NR license was something like $35.    My biggest tip for the river and pitching jigs would be that if you aren't getting snagged once in a while your jig is too light. Hung up too often and you are too heavy. I'm normally in the 1/8-1/4 ounce range. I have also caught a bunch of fish pitching cranks. I wasn't a believer until I watched Ed Carlson fish next to me and reel in fish while I kept on pitching my jig and not getting anything. Try something that's got a nice wide wobble. And if you are going to toss anything into the river be sure to remember that anything thats tied onto that line may not come back. I have donated lots of tackle to the old river gods over the years but I have also been rewarded with a lot of fish and some real dandies. These river fish have a lot of fight in them.     Remember that if you're keeping any walleyes or sauger on the red is that the limit is less than the MN and ND bag limit. I have seen more than one person ticketed at the north dam with their stringer of 4 eyes.     
    • eyeguy 54
      Hit the secret beach on the sippi for a couple hours today with some crawlers. wind was pretty crazy. smally bit first then a sucker. then caught 4 eyes and decided to leave. a young guy came down while I was fishing and was casting a spinnerbait and I asked him what he was after. he said bass so I let him know that it is illegal to target them and eyes till next month and that the game warden watches people in the area quite often. He said he had no idea he could not fish for them, thanked me and said he wont cast anymore. nice young guy. I bet he will be down again with some crawlers. 
    • SkunkedAgain
      I've seen a lot of people dragging raps for "crappies" before the opener
    • monstermoose78
      Bummer Erik