Guests - If You want access to member only forums on FM. You will gain access only when you Sign-in or Sign-Up on Fishing Minnesota.

It's easy - LOOK UPPER right menu.

Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
eyesonly

finding new fishing holes

6 posts in this topic

Walli1 or anyone else. I'm not a stalker or spot Crowder or anything but I've noticed you on many of your spots that you previously spoke about between Prescott and the narrows and wondering what type of structure you key on that makes you try these spots. don't want any of your spots, just a something to start with as far as what you see on your chip that makes a spot look interesting

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've spent years going up and down that stretch of river looking at the graph searching different areas, the areas that catch my eye are steep drops holding bait fish, the eyes tend to force the bait against the steep drop for a easy ambush, areas where rocky bottom meets silt bottom sometimes you just find one or more of those areas that eyes just always tend to be around for some reason, many times I go out and if the fish are active I'll try new areas looking for the next hot spot! The river is a the biggest fishing challenge there is, fish are in a area one day and gone the next but I have learned that somewhere on the river the fish are bitting it's just finding that area, 6.5 miles of river lay between the kinni and prescott, that's alot of water to get a grasp on and eight years I have under the belt doing it and I still am learning.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Walli , great stuff !

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Other things to look for on the river are areas or pockets where the bottom may only change a foot or two and the eyes will lay in this dip to get out of the current and ambush bait that goes over head, one area I know well is only aliitle larger than a boat and its along the top of a well fished area but tends to be over looked, I consider it one of my top ten spots for sure. I took a fellow onliner to the area last fall and we did really well! I'm so ready, I've taken apart all my reels cleaned them thoughly and re greased and oil them, the tackle box has been gone through and organized, hooks have all been replaced on my favorite cranks, still have to tie up my spinners and crawler harnesses other then that I'm ready!! cool.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Walli1, your post got me thinking, i can't remember the last time I've taken apart my reals to clean, what oil do you think works best?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I take apart my reels on a regular bases, I really like quantum hot sauce reel oil, I feel its one of the better ones out there, I ordered mine from bass pro but I'm sure you can find it in one of the local sport shops hope this helps!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0



  • Posts

    • Nhamm
      Ha!  Me too!  My father bought that last winter and was first voyage on ice. First ice on Leech was rough and those side by sides don't absorb all that well. . Still a good time.
    • thescottith
      Awesome, thanks.   SK
    • Jonesin4eyes
      They look interesting, might have to givem a try this winter    http://acmetackle.com/hyper-glide-bait/ 
    • Tom Sawyer
      Acme Tackle Hyper Glide Minnow
    • Rick
      For holiday gift ideas, consider a locally made gift created from trees harvested in Minnesota. Wooden toys, handcrafts and keepsakes are a great green gift option. Wood is a renewable resource that is natural, nontoxic and eco-friendly.   “Wood products are great green gifts for both kids and adults,” said Kristen Bergstrand, DNR utilization and marketing program coordinator. “Uniquely hand-crafted and individually customized wooden gifts are a wonderful option for a person who has everything.” Wooden blocks, rocking chairs or horses, puzzles, rattles, picture frames and artisan bowls or wood crafts are unique items that are often passed down to future generations as family mementos. Thousands of items are made from wood harvested in Minnesota forests. About 30 percent of the state’s wood fiber comes from state forest lands. The Minnesota forest products industry brings $16.1 billion to local economies. The industry creates jobs and brings financial support to small and large manufacturing and retail businesses across the state. Making products from trees often requires less processing and energy than plastic or other products. Wood is also renewable and reusable. Most wood products can be recycled and wood waste can be converted into green energy as biomass. Well-managed forests grow back into a forest after harvesting. And buying wood products also helps the environment. Trees absorb carbon dioxide, a greenhouse gas that causes global climate change, and store carbon in their wood. Locally made products from trees harvested in Minnesota use less fossil fuel for transportation than imported goods. Visit the DNR wood products webpage to learn more about the benefits of buying and using wood products. Discuss below - to view set the hook here.