Guests - If You want access to member only forums on FM. You will gain access only when you Sign-in or Sign-Up on Fishing Minnesota.

It's easy - LOOK UPPER right menu.

Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
bobdrm

Grass Shimp

10 posts in this topic

I lived in Devils Lake ND for 6 years and when you ice fish your hole fills up with grass shimp were did thay come from and how did thay get so many? All the lakes I fish here in MN I have never seen them here and I lived here all my life other than when I was in ND, could thay live in are lakes,would that make are fish bigger,can thay be transplanted here?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I notice that when I fish in SD too. Maybe it has something to do with the prairie pothole kind of lakes, could be why we don't see them around here. Just my 2 cents

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I fished Devil's a few times and wondered the same thing. Why is there none in MN? I think the shrimp play a roll in why Devils is such a great walleye/perch fishery though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was told that the lakes in the Dakotas have more alkaline which is suitable for grassy's. It would be interesting to find some scientific data on this and/or if it is also a water quality issue. Are there any biology brainiacs out there with more/better info?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am checking with MN and ND DNR but I have not herd from them yet will let you no when I do. Some one must know.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Are you guys talking about freshwater shrimp? Or is there two different kinds? I know the sloughs and lakes out here in south dakota are full of freshwater shrimp, that's why more ducks come through here instead of Minnesota. I think there why the fish are generally fatter out here too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Grass Shrimp is not native to our inland waters as far as I know in the midwest.

Are you are refering to a freshwater shrimp often called the Fairy shrimp or Gammarus (scuds, sideswimmers). There are two types of freshwater Shrimp in our interior lakes. These are the Hyella shrimp and the Gammarus shrimp. At a casual glance, the only visible difference is in their size. The Hyella never grow as large as the Gammarus. They hardly reach or grow more than 1 inch. I believe the shrimp are native to many lakes, ponds, and rivers all over the U.S. The type of shrimp found in Devils Lake is the Gammarus and not the Grass shrimp as far as I know.

Not all lakes can sustain large population of these shrimp and it may interfere with an ecological lake's system if introduced to a new or different lake which makes it not ideal. As strange as it sounds the shrimp could do more damage to native forage & species and offset the balance of the lakes. But in the right body of water it can yield an incredible fishery.

What makes Devils Lake special is the water has large contents of Calcium Carbonate & Magnesium Carbonate which these shrimp needs to sustain their bodies. Add along with the correct algae & food source. Not every lake has the ideal properties to sustain these invertebrates.

These shrimp make up an sustain the Devils lake fishery with their abundance as a food source for predatory fish.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have bought these shrimp and they were always marketed" as "grass shrimp" but regardless I have noticed that fish caught out of lakes that sustain a good population of these shrimp are very healthy fish. I have also noticed a few lakes in North Dakota that I have hunted are full of shrimp also. Fantastic hunting.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The only lake that I have seen what we called freshwater shrimp in MN was Scotch Lake near Cleveland. I noticed these when were were duck hunting and they would attach to your waders. I personally haven't fished this lake, but I heard from a couple friends that they did very well catching walleye's there this year.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Scotch Lake does have freshwater shrimp that is a fact (or at least it did in 1994). I conducted an experiment on macro-invertebrate populations in Scotch Lake while at college in St. Peter. The densities were nothing compared to what I see when hunting North Dakota.

I have seen ads offering freshwater shrimp for sale in Minnesota. I visited with a professional biologist about the viability of stocking freshwater shrimp in Minnesota wetalnds. His opinon was that if they do not exist currently, there is a reason. As others have stated there are multiple factors involved in the freshwater shrimp being present or absent. I know that one thing I have always heard is that minnow populations in wetlands have an impact on freshwater shrimp. The deeper wetlands of Minnesota do not completely freeze out each winter and thus higher minnow populations and lower freshwater shrimp popualtions. When fishing Devils Lake ND this January, I do not know how that can hold true. Every hole you drilled produced a dozen shrimp on the ice. I wish there was an easy answer, I know I would love to see wetlands and lakes of MN full of shrimp.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0



  • Posts

    • skibass
      We talked to a guy who did very well in 16 FOW by Frontier on Monday. Also heard from a group who did well near Birchdale (not sure on depth).  Our best luck was in 21-25 FOW
    • megofishing
      I am planning on kayaking and fishing the Cannon River this season--between Cannon Falls and Hwy 61. I just want to know if the current is generally swift or lazy, i.e., can I paddle BACK to my entrance spot or do you  need to drift downstream and do the two vehicle thing. I understand it may depend on how low or high the river is at any given time, but in general, when things are 'normal', can you paddle back with little difficulty?
    • maxpower117
      I'll keep it short and simple. The causes of boom and bust on Mille Lacs.    1. Improperly managed slot limits. Too many large fish are allowed in the lake.  2. Netting during spawn. Poor spawning success.    The recent years of high catch rates rates indicate a good 2013 year class but most importantly it is a red flashing light for anyone paying attention. High catch rates are a result of good population AND low or decreasing forage. I put AND in caps because fish won't bite like they have  when they're not hungry.    Cut down that year class class before it's too late. I give it 2 more summers before another crash is inevitable.    Round and round we go, where it stops, nobody knows. 
    • megofishing
      After using most of the brands you've mentioned, I absolutely love Lunkerhunt frogs...real lifelike, and don't seem to fill up with water as much as the others. They also hold up really well--caught some pike and bowfin without them getting destroyed. I have been using the "Croaker" color exclusively, but definitely picking up some other patterns. They also make a popper frog which is great if you want to make a little more noise.
    • megofishing
      I agree with AlwaysFishing--you can come down in line weight for braid if you're just straight up bass fishing. I personally like 30lb if there are a lot of toothy critters around. I use 50-60lb when going after pike and muskie. Have you ever tried fireline for your spinning rod? When jigging, wacky worming, etc., I use 8-12lb fireline exclusively--you can feel EVERYTHING and no stretch is an added bonus.