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icedoctor

Need Advise on Purchasing a Lund Tyee I/O

4 posts in this topic

I'm looking at purchasing a 2003 Lund 1950 Tyee I/O. I've never owned a boat with an I/O engine and I'm wondering if I'm going to have any issues launching this boat in smaller lakes? Are there any other draw-backs that I'm missing here regarding the I/O motor. Any advise or personal experiences would be a great help. Thanks

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Ive own a 22' starcraft IO, Loading/unloading the first couple times took some fine tuning as far as getting the trailer in the right depth and centering etc. I have a 2 speed winch that makes cranking way easier, I dont power load unless its calm. Ive put it in some skinny water before w/out too much issue at the launch, I do have many years of boating under my cap too so most of the learning was easy to figure out, Ive even lanched/loaded by my self many times.

as for the IO, I winterize my self to save some $, it may run you +/-$200. you'll be winterizing earlier in the fall than folks with an outboard since they self drain.

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An outboard has its fulcrum on the top of the transom. I/O fulcrum is mid transom. Still the lower unit will trim up past the keel of the boat. If you have a very steep ramp with shallow water its possible you could hit bottom with the lower unit but it would have to be so shallow that the keel would hit too. So I'll say as long as you can float the boat you shouldn't have a problem.

Draw back is winterizing and annual maintenance. A manual will go into detail as to what has to be done. The obvious is draining the block which is easy but theres more, a lot more. It takes me an afternoon to winterize and thats if no problems are found. Mind you its a completely winterized and inspection that includes annual maintenance of fuel systems, lower drive, engine, drive shaft, gimble bearing, bellows and so on. You can do it yourself or have it done by a shop. Just make sure they do more then drain the block and that everything is done.

An outboard takes me 1/2 hour tops.

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Thanks for the advise. Being able to trim up beyond the keel is really what I was worried about. If it floats then I shouldn't have a problem. A little extra time on winterizing isn't that big of a deal.

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