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Suggestions on turkey tactics for my season?

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I drew a non-res turkey tag for WI. My season is May 9-13th and I'll be hunting a little south of Baldwin, WI. I'll be on private property, but am expecting the birds to be pretty weary by then. I've only hunted turkey's one other time and that was in Iowa and I was guided by a friend. This time I'm on my own. I'm planning on a scouting trip towards the end of March, maybe even in April. During my season, I'm assuming alot of hens will be on nests so the gobblers should be hard up for a date? How would some of you experienced turkey hunter's handle this situation? Any call or decoy set up preferences? I'll be bowhunting as well, using a Double Bull blind.

Thanks,

Brian

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I live in an area where I watch turkeys all though the spring season [stalker?] anyway Tom's still are looking for love into May,and since so many hens are nesting the odds that if you use decoy's and are set up in the right spots you can have success.One important thing I have found is the strutting areas change from early to late season,so do not get completly hung up on where you see Tom's strutting early,they will use differn't area's later in the season sometimes because of pressure,or lack of hens in their old area.Tom turkeys are like all men,they go where the ladies are/or near.

Good luck hunting

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watch your blind. I had a Double Bull if you use it on a woodline It will stick out like a sore thumb so camo it up with brush or grass so it blends in better. they say turks don't notice but they do. On the positive side double bull blinds work great in the middle of a pasture or hayfield. Turks don't seem to mind them in wide open areas. Plus Bowhunting don't be afraid to ditch the blind. I've shot more turks out of the blind than in it with my bow. I've had good late season luck finding toms and getting ahead of them and let them walk in to my shot. Last bird I shot I never even called. He was comming of a feild he got thirty yards away and i shot him.

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First off,I'd go down there to scout in April.Birds could still be bunched up in March yet and might not be spread out from there wintering areas.

If the birds have been hunted before you get there,you might want to tone down your calling some and just put out 1 hen decoy.

The hens will still come out to feed in the mornings, but should start to drift off around mid morning to go set on the nest. Mid to late morning could be your best time to call in a tom.

Best of luck to you.

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Biggest thing is stay in the woods as long as you can. Your odds go up as hens go to their nest and toms are still looking for love.

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I have been hunting WI southwest of Baldwin for several years. I've found that WI has more turkeys than the area I hunt in MN. Numerous hens. I usually see hens all day long. Sometimes I wonder how they ever hatch any eggs because it seems they never sit on them. Don't count on the Toms being hot and easy. They have no trouble finding girlfriends. The birds do get call shy. I use a double bull blind but have never had turkeys spook from it even in a plowed field. I set up in an open field that I know turkeys often travel through and I wait them out. I usually call softly about every 45 minutes or so.

Good luck!

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Hens will have up to two clutches a year. With that being said even birds in late season have to mate. Get yourself a jake decoy and a hen decoy and set the jake like he is mounting the hen. Find one of those gooble calls and start calling with the gooble then switch to your slate. Make it seem like two birds are hooking up. If any toms see or hear this, going on in late season, he is going to get so mad that a teenager is going to steal one of his girls he will come right in. If you want to let him come in and fight your decoy he will. It is quite a site to see your decoy getting tourn apart by your future wall mount. If there is any wall mounters in WI. LOL. smile.gif

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many say gobbling near your decoy in full camo is a safety issue... I personally wouldn't do it on public land for sure. You never know who else is out there.

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Had a few chapters written, but the internet gods have swallowed my advice! That's probably advantageous over the typical wordy thread-killers I've been writing. smile.gif

So here's the shortened version:

-Take the temp of these birds with dekes; any ill-effects or shy birds, go to lone hen or get rid of them

-Use the double bull to cut-off or cover more ground; middle of a hayfield is ok, a 20 yd shot from a corner they frequent is better. This way you can shoot to the corner, or either line should they try and skirt you or your spread

-Call to their mood, esp. if they've been hunted before

-Have confidence. G/H seasons in MN can often be the best times to be out in the woods, as they were last year for me where I hunted. Many more gobbling and active birds that were not henned up.

Good luck!

Joel

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Quote:

many say gobbling near your decoy in full camo is a safety issue... I personally wouldn't do it on public land for sure. You never know who else is out there.


Your right gorilla I hunt private so I don't worry. Plus never know in WI.LOL cool.gif

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