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flagsup

seems lately with the high baro,fishing is always good but catching isnt.lots of lookers on the camera,but not willing to open theyre mouths.any coments?been keepin an eye on this thyis winter,30 plus baro-tough bite,or is it just me.friends havn same luck,try again tonight,but lookin forward to next week,mid 30's droppin bar0,HEAT WAVE!but atleast now we have safe ice tongue.gif

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Flamefox

if the baro gets to high nothing will bite, but i seen it when the baro was really low like 29.23 they bit like mad. the most ideal baro is 29.60 to 29.73 try to watch for it to stay around 29.70 that was the best one yet. ur right we got really good ice now:)

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Team Otter

When the barometric pressure is high or even on the rise, focus on softer bottom areas to improve your chances. Likewise, if the barometric pressure is low or falling, look to areas of hard sand or gravel.

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flagsup

thanks for the tips,will try the hard,soft bottom issue in the future

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Team Otter

No problem. You should see better results with that information.

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Jamie5ltr

Thanks Team Otter this was one of the question I had that I wanted ask at your seminar that I never got to. I was curious on to ideas on where to look for fish when there us a high pressure system in.

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tims

Why do you think fish relate to these areas? Does it relate to their feeding patterns?

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Team Otter

As we all know, the feeding pattern of fish is related much to light and weather. When big changes come in weather, such as a "cold front" or dropping barometric pressure, fish will find themselves much more comfortable in sand or gravel areas because bait fish like to nose themselves into the steeper edges and/or "first break" areas or lay on the bottom in these types of bottom profiles. When the pressure is up, softer bottom areas are more prone to encourage bug hatches, etc, which ultimately attracts and holds bait fish and fish in a praticular area for longer than one would normally expect.

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MuleShack

Great Info Otter!!

Both of your comments are news to me, as i knew the barometer affected the fishing, but never bothered to track it...much less even thought about the fish movements.

Likewise i will have to put that in the old book of knowledge...I'm only on page 2 by the way cool.gif

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Team Otter

We shouldn't have any trouble getting you to page 10 before the 'eye opener. grin.gif

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Big Dave2

Effects of Barometric Pressure on Fishing

By Lee Adams

It has been known for a long time that the barometric pressure has an effect on fishing. How the pressure directly effects the fish is still not fully understood, but knowing how to use the barometric pressure readings can greatly increase your chances of catching fish, especially in shallow and fresh waters.

Barometric pressure is the measure of the weight of the atmosphere above us. It exerts pressure on the waters we fish and even on us. In fact, it can change how well some people feel. It is believed by many, that it may have a similar and even more dramatic effect on fish effecting their feeding habits.

Measurement of barometric pressure is accomplished with the use of a barometer. A barometer measures the weight of the atmosphere per square inch (pressure) and compares it to the weight of a column of mercury.

The first instrument was invented in 1643 by Evangelista Torricelli. His barometer used a glass tube from which all air has been removed (a vacuum) and is inserted into a container of mercury that is exposed to the pressure of the air. The air pressing down on the mercury in the container forces an amount of the mercury up into the glass tube. The height to which the mercury rises is directly proportional to the pressure of the atmosphere. This is usually measured in inches (inHg) or in millibars (1 inHg equals 33.864 millibars).

Today aneroid barometers, invented by the French scientist Lucien Vidie in 1843, are the most widely used instrument to detect air pressure. An aneroid is a flexible metal bellow that has been sealed after removing some of it's air (a partial vacuum). A higher atmospheric pressures will squeeze the metal bellow while a lower pressure will allow it to expand. This expansion of the metal is usually mechanically coupled to a dial needle which will point to a scale indicating the barometric pressure.

A new form of barometer uses a pressure transducer. This transducer is like a miniature aneroid barometer that converts the amount of air pressure into a proportional electrical voltage. This voltage then can be fed into a digital readout and/or into a computer.

Barometric pressure varies with altitude. A higher elevation will have less atmosphere above it which exerts less pressure. To keep readings standard across the world, barometric pressure is to be indicated at sea level. Therefore, readings at elevations other than at sea level will require a correction factor which is based on the elevation and the air temperature (colder air weighs more and will require a greater correction).

The barometric pressure changes as the weather systems over us changes. When you look at a weather map that has those blue "H"s and red "L"s, this is indicating the areas with High and Low pressure. It is worth noting that the areas with high pressure are the areas with good weather, and the areas with low pressure are the areas with bad weather. Barometric pressure has been used by weathermen since the beginning of meteorology to predict the weather. It can also be used by fishermen to predict the quality of fishing, and more importantly, how to fish.

As a general guideline, think of 30 inHg (1016 millibar) as being a normal level. World records vary from a high pressure of 32.0 inHg in Siberia to 25.7 inHg during a typhoon (both readings are off the scale of most barometers). For the US, extreme levels can be considered as 30.5 inHg and 28.5 inHg. When it comes to fishing, a change of just +/- 0.02 inHg from normal is enough to effect their feeding habits.

It is important, however, to note that the effects of barometric pressure is greater in fresh and shallow waters, than it is in deeper waters. This is probably due to the fact that the pressure of water is so much greater in deeper waters making the air pressure above it no longer having any significance.

Some general rules regarding barometric pressure are:

Pressure Trend

Typical Weather

Fishing Trends

Suggested Tactics

High

Clear skies

Fish slow down, find cover or go to deeper waters.

Slow down lures and use baits more attractive to fish. Fish in cover and in deeper waters.

Rising

Clearing or improving

Fish tend to become slightly more active

Fish with brighter lures and near cover. Also fish at intermediate and deeper depths.

Normal and stable

Fair

Normal fishing

Experiment with your favorite baits and lures.

Falling

Degrading

Most active fishing

Speed up lures. Surface and shallow running lures may work well.

Slightly lower

Usually cloudy

Many fish will head away from cover and seek shallower waters. Some fish will become more aggressive.

Use shallow running lures at a moderate speed.

Low

Rainy and stormy

Fish will tend to become less active the longer this period remains.

As the action subsides, try fishing at deeper depths.

It is important to note that after a long feeding period, the action will slow regardless of the following conditions. On the flip side, a long period of poor fishing conditions may be followed by a really good one.

It is also important to note, that the barometric pressure is just one of many factors that effect fish feeding habits. Other effects include water temperature, light, tidal forces, water clarity, the pH level, water levels, wind/surface disturbance, boat traffic, fishing pressure, and so on. Another good judging factor of fishing is the solunar effects which play a role in the tidal and illumination factors.

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clamtrap

Where did you find this information it really good. If you could e-mail it to me if you would thanks

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MuleShack

This just added 3 pages to the old book! grin.gif

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Team Otter

Thanks for sharing.

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blue_healer_guy

For the low pressure guys, you should get a good dose this weekend.

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Big Dave2

Clamtrap, I did a search on google. You basically have it all though.

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clamtrap

thanks very much

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