Guests - If You want access to member only forums on FM. You will gain access only when you Sign-in or Sign-Up on Fishing Minnesota.

It's easy - LOOK UPPER right menu.

Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
mcaputo

MPR News: Have you heard the "sounds" of a frozen lake?

7 posts in this topic

In winter, the land if 10,000 lakes becomes the land of 10,000 frozen ice sheets, many of them popping, pinging and cracking.

Those who live near lakes report hearing moaning , or even crying like a child as the ice expands and contracts.

Do you live near a lake? Has the ice ever "spoken" to you?

If so, share your tale with Minnesota Public Radio reporter Tim Post by clicking the link below and giving us your story.

https://www.publicradio.org/applications/formbuilder/user/form_display.php?form_code=de6cc17a2f21

Tim first became interested in the story during lunch a few weeks ago.

"I heard strange sounds coming from a frozen lake here at Collegeville," he says. "Those icy creaks and groans are nothing new to people who spend a lot of time on or near a lake in the winter. But I thought stories of what people have heard on the ice would make for a great Minnesota Public Radio story."

Tim is busy collecting sounds of the ice now. He'd love your help. And, if you know someone with an "ice sound" story to tell, pass this message along to them.

Thanks for your help.

Michael Caputo

Analyst, Public Insight Journalism

MPR News

(651) 290-1081

mcaputo@mpr.org

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Michael - Let me be one of the first to say "WELCOME" to our site! I think the story that will be produced from your findings should be interesting. Please let us know what the final product looks like.

As for strange sounds on the ice, please take a look at the Upper Red Lake forum. There is a post out there about a sound, equivalent to a train coming down the tracks, and then making all sorts of noise and shaking everything. I never witnessed this, but read the stories on that forum.

Again welcome to the site!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is also a similar thread in the Alexandria forum titled "Minnewaska ice quake" where it talks about a boom so loud that it was felt in nearby homes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Many years ago, back when I was still in high school we had a house on Millie. We stayed over one night and in the morning we heard a sound like a jet coming down the lake doing a fly by which was not uncommon in those days from either Grand Forks or Duluth air bases. Anyway I went outside the house and about 100-150 yds away the ice broke up into a large ice ridge and pushed up 5-6 ft. The water must have gone 15 ft in the air as the ice pushed together. That was a sight to see, needless to say a spare pair of shorts would have been nice. Thank god it didn't go through any houses. Bill

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You bet we will. I think that this is a really interesting idea for a story by Tim Post. We've already gotten a few responses from folks directly to that link. Thank you for opening your forum to help us tell this story.

Mike Caputo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dear Mr. Turck:

I would love to share this story with reporter Tim Post - and he may very well like to call you as he is doing his reporting. Is there a contact phone and/or email that I can reach you at. If you prefer - give me an email at mcaputo@mpr.org.

Thanks again

Michael Caputo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You can email me at my office a026457@allstate.com I will be out of the office Wed at 1100am until Monday morning 2/25. Headed to Lake of the Woods. Happy to talk with you. Bill Turck

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0



  • Posts

    • CigarGuy
      Del,  it's on Cook, MN facebook....March 23.  Timberjay, you need a subscription to view entire story.
    • Rick
      The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources will collect and analyze water samples from about 90 wells in Washington County this spring. The data are being collected for the Washington County Geologic Atlas, an effort involving the Minnesota Geological Survey and the DNR’s Ecological and Water Resources Division.  DNR staff will contact county residents to request permission for well sampling, which involves collecting a water sample and measuring the depth to water in each well. Tests will profile the general chemical characteristics of area groundwater and will also show approximately how long the water has been underground. Geology, location, well depth and well construction will determine the selection of wells for sampling. Owners of sampled wells will receive a report of the laboratory results for the water sample collected from their well. Preserving the long-term quality of the region’s surface water and groundwater requires that policymakers have access to accurate information based on sound scientific principles. A county geologic atlas is a valuable tool for county planners, resource managers and other local government staff when making general planning, land use management and water resource protection decisions. The Minnesota Geological Survey has already published Part A of the atlas, which illustrates details of each county’s geology. In 2019, the DNR will publish the groundwater portion of the atlas (Part B). The Part B reports will include maps and descriptions of the distribution and movement of groundwater, cross sections illustrating groundwater conditions, and the pollution sensitivity of aquifers in the county. The DNR County Geologic Atlas program is funded in part by the Minnesota Environment and Natural Resources Trust Fund as recommended by the Legislative-Citizen Commission on Minnesota Resources. Funding also comes from the Clean Water Fund, which receives 33 percent of the sales tax revenue from the Clean Water, Land and Legacy Amendment approved by voters in November 2008. A full description of this DNR program and status reports for atlas products is available on the DNR website. For information, contact: Jim Berg, DNR hydrogeologist, 651-259-5680, jim.a.berg@state.mn.us; or Paul Putzier, DNR county geologic atlas program supervisor, 651-259-5692, paul.putzier@state.mn.us. Discuss below - to view set the hook here.
    • delcecchi
      I looked at cook, mn page didn't see the story.  both webpage   cookmn.com and the facebook page https://www.facebook.com/CookMn/ and the cook group   https://www.facebook.com/groups/396154887224760/ Not on Timberjay site either.     You can post a link by just copy/and paste the url from the bar in your browser into your post. 
    • AlwaysFishing23
      I would say gas augers are still getting better. For example my solo engine always starts never leaks and emissions are very very low. I don't think I burned a half gallon of gas the whole winter and I drilled maybe 500 holes max still not a lot but pretty good for only using a cup or so of fuel an outing. Not saying electrics are bad but for me I just can't pull my self away from the convince of gas. Every winter I think I do give more and more respect to cordless drill or electric set ups. Well then also with this last winter we had a goo full 24 inches of ice for maybe 3 weeks this it starting melting fast
    • Wanderer
      I like the electrics too but it will be a necessity for me to finally give up my gasser for good.  One tank on it can cut many, many holes.  Batteries are expensive so I don't plan on buying extras for those days I plan to explore.   I think it was mentioned on the forums before: With the mapping apps and gps we have available now, we probably all drill fewer holes over the season than we used to.  The problem I have though is I don't repeat locations many times over the winter. Heck, not even lakes that often.  I've been carrying the gas, electric and hand auger pretty much all winter.