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icemac33

Propane tank on its side?

15 posts in this topic

Is this a big no-no? I was looking at an 11 # tank fitting under the seat of my Fishtrap.It would have to lay on its side. The tank on the forklift at work is on its side.Different tank or valve design?

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Yeah, that's a big no-no, simply because the pressure relief device may not function properly, thus this also allows a tank that isn't burning to allow liquid to escape quicker and relieve pressure more quickly. They do have a tendency of blowing w/o you touching it by laying down due to increased pressure on the valve.

I've seen the one's you are talking about, and I believe they are a different valve design that allows this to happen. The above mentioned relates only to propane tanks that are designed to sit in the upright position.

Hope this helps.

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depends on the valve the type used for mr heaters and bb q"s and a vapor type, the ones you see on there side are a liquid propand, they have a longer tube in the valve and use a liquid form of fuel instead of a vapor hope this helps

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As mentioned above, not a good idea! A tank should always be in the upright position whether its in use, in storage, or being transported. The general idea for this is to reduce the chance of knocking off the valve. Because its made out of brass The valve is the weakest link.

Quote:

They do have a tendency of blowing w/o you touching it by laying down due to increased pressure on the valve.


?

I've never heard of that. The valve is designed to relieve the pressure of the tank through the release of vapor. Its easier to reduce pressure by venting vapor rather than liquid. The pressure on the PRV is the same whether its on its side, upright, or upsidedown.

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The only time it would blow up by itself is if were on the side for an extended amount of time and there was a huge pressure build-up. It not something that is "common" per say, but it is possible that it may occur.

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Don't even think of getting the 11 lb tall propane tank, get the 11 lb pancake tank much better to handle and they don't tip over in or out of your fishtrap.

grin.gif

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I'll second the pancake style. Very stabile!!

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Thanks Guys. Appreciate the input. I was tempted by a nice little 5# at Fleet Farm today, but I need something to get me two full days at URL. Sounds like its the 11# pancake for me.

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Well, I'm sure you won't be disappointed. I have had the same pancake for a number of years, there super nice and don't ever have to worry about knocking them over. GL and hope that makes your fishing alot easier.

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Quote:

Thanks Guys. Appreciate the input. I was tempted by a nice little 5# at Fleet Farm today, but I need something to get me two full days at URL. Sounds like its the 11# pancake for me.


I have a 5# tank that I use all of the time when I really need to reduce weight. It lasts for 2 days easily on my Buddy Heater.

I have to second the 11# tank though as that way you will not have to have it filled as often.

I usually carry a 20# tank in my Otter sleds.

Cliff

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A short true story about propane tanks on their side. A few years back my uncle was transporting a 20# tank on it's side on the back of his four wheeler. Well he didn't secure it good enough and it started to rock back and forth. A bunge worked open the valve and the escaping gas ignited from the exhaust resulting in a rocket powered Arctic Cat 500. shocked.gif He luckily was able to shut off the tank before anything real bad happened.

I like putting my tanks in milk crates. It's easy to carry and easy to secure.

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You're uncle isn't Clark Griswold is he? grin.gif I would assume the next stop was home to change his shorts.

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Nope he's Uncle Buck. A shorts change was probably needed.

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Better yet.....Red Green. grin.gif

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That must have been one really old tank!!!!!

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