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Dahitman44

Muzzleloading question for MN

23 posts in this topic

Is it legal in MN to have a muzzleloader with a scope?

Some say yes, some say no. Others say a 2x scope is legal but it is a waste of time because it doesn't help much

Anyone know the skinny?

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Sorry Hit

Not legal to have a scope, only legal to have a one power that is authorized by a doctor and an application is filled out.

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You can scope a smokepole and use it in a regular firearm season. Come ML season, the scope must come off.

There is a pretty good description of legal ML season sights in the DNR regulations.

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They should allow it -- would make more "kill" shots..

My thoughts.

Thanks, guys.

Hitman

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no need to start a debate here hitman, but the whole reason people don't want scoped muzzleloaders is to keep the firearm "primitive". Isn't that why you shoot a muzzleloader? Or is it to extend the gun season? I thought people shot muzzleloaders for a challenge? confused.gif

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I use my muzzleloader almost exclusively during slug season with a scope on top. I just feel better with it than the slug gun and know for absolutely sure where and what my load and bullet can accomplish. One shot one kill.

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Well, I think the line was crossed with the "In-Line" muzzleloader. I guess "Primative" is just relative to who can lobby the best. Bad Bull came out with what sounds to be an elephant muzzleloader and now anyone who has a muzzleloader that burns nitro powder is not going to be allowed to use nitro powder. The nitro powder by it self as a propellant isn't the problem. Most weapons using it only gain 10% in velocity and 20% in energy. But this one manufacturer has beefed up their weapon and push a plain jacketed bullet with enough energy to probably take out an elephant and now the rest of us get lumped into the same catagory just because we use the same powder. Not too fair a conclusion I don't think.

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I am not trying to get into a debate. I am just saying that a scope would allow for greater percentage of kill shots. Just my thought on the issue.

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I do agree that a scope would make for cleaner kills.

<IMHO> Here in MN we have a Ml season not a primitive ML season. The states that have a primitive season usually set the season before the smokeless season and do restrict the ML to be a rock lock or side lock.

Since 90 to 95% of the Minnesota ML hunters are using Inlines I see no reason not to allow scopes. Actually the ML hunters get what is left over after 500,000 smokeless hunters hit the woods.

<BTW> I have hunted the ML season since its beginning and use a Lyman side lock. I would put a scope on the lyman in a heart beat if allowed.

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all intresting points, especially ScoutII's comment about the in'line muzzleloaders crossing the line of primitive. I think this is akin to the difference between shooting a modern compound to a recurve bow.

I appreciate the fact that guys have managed to keep this discussion civil. Thank you!

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This muzzleloading question comes up every year and there are reasons for both. I do believe that MN should have a primitive season and a one week ML season where any ML may be used. I dont believe it needs to be 3 weekends and 2 weeks of full hunting. Even though in some places it may be needed.

I would like to place a scope on my muzzleloader, but people just need to know that if they are over one hundred yards with open sights that it is a difficult shot. I limit myself to 100, i shot a doe last year at about 10 yards. And thats how i like to do it, up close and personal.

ML is a great time and i love it, even htough this year again i have no buck tag frown.gif. But i will still get out there and have a good time. Have a good season boys.

A. Shae

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Dead --

Easy with the "primative" notation.

The in-line guns have made them a bit more accurate and a ton easier to clean. They are still fun.

More time to hunt. Perfect, in my opinion.

BTW -- we need a handgun season as well. That would be fun.

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hitman I wasn't trying to knock the muzzleloader thing or anything like that. I agree that theres a big difference between a flint lock and the newer inlines. And I agree that they are just as fun as a modern rifle. I was just saying that I thought the whole reason to have a muzzleloader is to have a more "traditional" (how's that wording?) hunt. The technology is out there to have a muzzleloader shoot just as fast and as accurate as the modern rifle. I'm just thinking that if you make the muzzleloader almost the same as a rifle (nitro, scope, etc.), why not just extend the rifle season then, since there would be little to no difference? I thought the reason for using a muzzleloader was to make it more challenging than a rifle.

I think it's great that there's another oppportunity for you big game hunters out there to pursue your passion. The guys I work with have a blast muzzleloader hunting; seems to me they have more excitement and fun then, than during rifle season.

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Point --

I know a lot of people think it is easy to cshoot a tight pattern with a muzzle but I do not have that skill. I am learning to becomechallenge a better shot, but for me it is still a tough thing to do.

Just my thoughts on the muzzle.

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I've hunted with a muzzle loader for a number of years now and I think that it is all in the wording of muzzle loader. I mean no matter what kind of powder you use or weather its a flint lock or an inline, you are still limited to one shot and most all the muzzle loaders I have seen still have a muzzle volocity less than most leagal Fire arms. I do however think that the adding of a scope would possibly give the shooter a faults impression of being able to shoot farther than his or her muzzle loader is capable of.

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My point is that it will make your first and only shot more of a kill shot than a gut shot.

My brother in law shot a doe and gut shot her and still has not found her. What a waste. frown.gif

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Muzzleloaders are accurate guns even with open sights. Its a solid 50-75 yard gun. With a deers vitals haveing roughly 10-12 inch diameter circle, hitting them should not be a problem at 50 yards. If it is you really need to look at getting the deer closer to make sure you can. For myself i wont shoot one further than 125 for one that they look small in open sights thne and that is my limit. Also the bullet drop after 125 becomes outragous.

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2-shae --

Not. The shot is good for 220 yards without drop with 150 grain.

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I shoot 100 grains, bc thats all i need and if you can hit one at 220 you are way beyond my class of shooting.

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I do understand what you are saying and I agree with you. The problem is, is that a muzzle loader as of now is considered a primitive form of hunting and with all the advancements that have been brought into the feild these last few years I'm afriad that we all might be tradeing our new fangled muzzys in for flint locks.

confused.gifNext thing you know the only legal Muzzys are going to be something you have to rub two sticks togeather to fire off, if you know what I mean.

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I could see the DNR changing the definition of a muzzleloader in the next few years and making it an actual primitive season.

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some states have differn muzzleloading seasons. Primitative (Flint Locks) and inlines season. Flints are usually a lot longer.

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Shae --

I didn't say I could hit them from that far away, just that they fly pretty straight that far. wink.gif

Naw -- 150 yards would be as far as I would want to try.

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