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Swill

Best way to transport your gear and hanging stand when you have to hike in?

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Hi Stand Hunters....

Does any one have a good set up or suggestions as to the best way to bring in all your gear (stand, backpack, weapon) when you have to hike in to your stand location? I hunt an area where no vehicle are allowed,so a lot of my time is spend hiking in. Which would not be bad except my Lone Tree hanging stand, climbing sticks, hunting bag, bow and arrow, etc are really adding up the weight. Plus, last week when it was really cold, I had all my heavy weight camo on...so by the time I get to my stand location I am all worn out. There has to be a better set up for doing this... Any ideas?

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Only thing I can think of besides multiple trips is maybe get a climbing stand? Then you would eliminate the climbing steps. I have a Summit viper ss and it is actually pretty light and has the backpack straps so it isn't too hard to carry in with my bow and hunting bag if I bring it with.

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I would also agree with a climbing stand.When in Montana a few years back,I had to walk in approx 1 mile.I bought a alum hang on stand with a back strap and used tree pegs and got in pretty easy.Bow in one hand,gear in a fanny pack and stand on my back.

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My sons and I hunt a state park during the firearm season. They do not allow you to leave your stand up overnight so we haul everything in each morning and take it out at night. Because we want to hunt as far as possible from the road, we haul everything in on a 2 wheeled deer cart we bought at Cabelas.

On the way in, we put our backpacks on the bottom then strap the stands on top. This keeps everything as quiet as possible. We lock the cart to a tree away from our stands.

On the way out we put the deer(we have fit 2)on the cart then the stands then our backpacks with rachet straps to hold everything on. With 2 deer, 2 stands, and 2 backpacks, it's quite a load but easier than carrying the gear and dragging the deer.

If you buy a cart get the magnum size with the taller wheels. It's easier to get it over logs and wider so it won't tip over so easy.

Who said hunting was supposed to be easy?

BOYZ

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I really like ideas guys...

I have a climbing stand, but it is old and pretty heavy compared to todays standards. So I think I should look at a new climbing stand, also...

I have seen those deer carts, but I did not even think about hauling my gear on one. Cool idea... That would work good for trails, but how are the carts off road?

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I've got the Lone WOlf Alpha stand. I use Summitt bucksteps (smaller and better than the LW sticks but 2.5lbs heavier). Those 2 clamp together in a dead quiet combo on my back and weighs about 19lbs (lighter than almost any climber).

I've started using a glorified fanny pack instead of a backpack, but when I use my backpack I run the straps over the top of the stand so they drape over the "V" portion of the platform. This holds all that together.

Finally, I bought my backpack because it had an attached pouch that covers the top of the pack and buckles in the front. This provides a place to put my bow. It lays on the front of the pack, pouch comes over the top and covers the middle of the bow. Buckles hold it in. It all goes on my back leaving my hands free.

The other thing that I haven't tried yet but my buddy loves is the same setup except he uses the Primos bow sling. Just throw it over your shoulder. You still have to hold onto it but its better than holding it in your hands.

As far as getting sweated up, wear more layers. Even during late season hunting I wear mroe layers of thinner materials instead on one bulky layer on the outside. I walk over a mile to get to one of my stands and when its below zero you will kill your self, literally, if you wear all your gaer on the walk out. I throw all my upper body clothing in the backpack and maybe my outer pants too. Walk out in just your long underwear or whatever is comfortable. Slow down bwfore you get to your stand. Cool off (it happens fast) and start putting your clothes on. Your movement will warm your clother and warm you up too. Then proceed to your stand and hopefully you didn't sweat so much that you get frost on the inside of your clothes. Only thing worse than walking right back out after humping all your gear all that way because you're freezing, is getting hypothermia and being all the way out there and having to try and get all the way back if you're frozen and unable to walk or make decisions. I've had mild hypothermia and frostbite before and it not pleasant.

Wow that soapbox is getting taller....hope I helped more than preached.

PS, I can get a pic of my setup if you'd like to see it.

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The carts work OK off the trails if the woods isn't too thick. The worst is on a side hill trying to go over logs. They tend to tip over on their side. I would travel much lighter if I didn't use the cart.

BOYZ

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Powerstroke hit it right on as far as the clothes. Thin layers work best and putting your heavier coats, bibs, etc in a backpack works the best for me. I usually attach the backpack to my portable and wear them both on my back. Other things such as knives, binocs, scent killer and other misc. things I like to put in a smaller fanny pack and wear around my waist. Where I hunt we usually hike a mile or two back into the woods and this has worked for me. Also allowing a little extra time so that you can stop once in a while before you get all sweated up is a good idea too.

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tip for you......we hunt state parks as well. On top of the climber tree stands we use bunge straps instead of a back pack to haul clothes and boots. U can fit pretty much as many clothes on top of that stand as u want and bunge it all down so its compressed as well. Its very nifty but on colder days a snow suit, boots, and sweashirts and and other clothes make it a very heavy setup. We hunt all day though so its only 2 trips one before dark, one after. grin.gif

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I've read a lot of good ideas here. I'll have to check into the Summit climbing sticks.

I do a lot of bow hunting on public land where I have to hike in to get back to the best spots. If I only have to go in 800 yards or less than I prefer my Summit climber because it is so comfortable to sit in but it weights 23 lbs. Combine that with a pack full of gear and a bow, which I use a primos bow sling, its a lot of weight.

If its further, than I have a super lightweight aluminum hang on stand that weights less than 10 lbs. but its very small and not nearly as comfortable. I also bring 10 pegs which must weight less than 5 lbs. and then I strap my back pack of gear to the stand and carry it all on my back. I dress in layers and strap the heaviest clothes to my stand. I just purchased a down jacket because its very warm, very lightweight and squishes down to a very small size that I can fit it in my backpack.

If there is a smooth trail back to the area I want to hunt and its a really long way, I will sometimes use a cart or sled to carry my stuff most of the way but they are noisy. I always have the cart or sled in the truck to help me get the deer out.

Nels

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I ride the mountain bike in ......I built a handle bar mount for the bow and one for the shotgun., climbing stand draped in hunter orange,is on my back. Quieter than walking.....get's you there quicker too !!

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Hey walleyeweasel....

I tried my mountain bike a few times, but the area I hunt is super sandy, so my tires just dig in and spin...

Did you have to modify your mountain bike for hunting? I have 2 of those kid wagons and I was thinking modifying one for hauling all my gear (bow, stand, bag, etc...)

You would think a mountain bike would be perfect....

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