Guests - If You want access to member only forums on FM. You will gain access only when you Sign-in or Sign-Up on Fishing Minnesota.

It's easy - LOOK UPPER right menu.

Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
MuskieJunkie

Toyota Corolla - interference engine?

15 posts in this topic

I have an old beater car that is probably due for a timing belt, I would rather just take my chances and drive it until the belt snaps as long as it isn’t an interference engine. Can anyone tell me if it is or not? ’93 Toyota Corolla with the 1.8 liter engine. Thanks a lot, I appreciate the help.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If I recall correctly, Toyota doesn't have any interference engines in there late model vehicles. This would include the 1.6, 1.8, 2.0, 2.2, 3.0, and 3.4 litres (thats all I can think of). I'm not sure about the 4.7 v-8.

The only problem we see when these belts break is that a lot of the time it damages the timing covers. Other than that the recomended service is every 60,000 miles under severe conditions. I would check with the dealer on replacing the belt. The usually offer the belt replacement for the 4 cylinders at around $200. At least thats the info I get in the fliers they send to me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not to rob this thread or anything, but Airjer, what is the going rate for a 3.4 liter V-6 Timing belt replacement? I have 103,000 on my 1997 Tacoma 4x4, and have been pondering getting it done.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Quote:

If I recall correctly, Toyota doesn't have any interference engines in there late model vehicles. This would include the 1.6, 1.8, 2.0, 2.2, 3.0, and 3.4 litres (thats all I can think of).


I believe you can plug the 2.4 in there as well. I'm pretty sure that's what's in my Camry and RAV.

I don't even know if they have a belt or a chain blush.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I do believe that the 2.4 liter and for sure the 2.7 liter have a timing chain.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In that kneck of the woods I would expect $300 to $600 dollars. Depending on weather you replace the water pump, drive belts, and do a coolant flush at the same time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Junkie- I have had two corollas one with well over 200,000 and my current one approaching that benchmark very rapidly. Never have replaced a timing belt. Just fix stuff when it is about to break. I have been real lucky, neither car ever left me stranded.

Warning highjack in progress: My '91 (current) corolla when it gets really hot (like 95 degree day, and on the freeway for longer trips[over 40 miles]) if I pull over and make a stop, shut the car off, I return a few minutes later and find that the car is dead to the world. Turn the key and the car won't turn over. Now if I wait a few hours try it again, it starts and runs like a champ. Is there an overload some where? I can never get it to happen while I am at home near testing equipment. Any ideas? Airjer?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks alot Aijer! That's what I wanted to know, and thanks for the info that you share!Much appreciated!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Let me guess The lights, radio, windshiels wipers, And every other electrical device works properly, it just won't crank over (turn the key and dont hear the engine turning over).

If this is the case the problem is more than likely the starter sufferring from heat soak. Either the windings in the starter or the solenoid are opening when hot so that the current cannot pass through.

If nothing works, the car is completely dead, I would start with battery conections and then work my way to the major vehicle grounds. Remeber when electrical parts get hot there resistance is greater than if they are cold (Except for thermisters of course grin.gif)!

Hope this helps

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Quote:

I do believe that the 2.4 liter and for sure the 2.7 liter have a timing chain.


That's what I was thinking. Got 60k on the RAV and 30k on the Camry. Still got a little while to think about it.

Thanks Airjer

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

First assumption was correct airjer- What the heck is "heat soak"?! Stroke? Would a new starter remedy the problem? That is what I was thinking was the problem. But with a car that old I might just plan my stops to not include one after a long hot spell (engine temp). wink.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Heat soak is a real common problem on old fords. Basically when you stop moving all that engine heat gets trapped in the engine compartment. The starter gets as hot as it ever will.

Do you hear a click at all when you turn the key. If you do this is a good sign. The click means that the solenoid is still working and the problem may be the contact plate plunger thingy grin.gif (Thats so wrong on so many levels but I cant think of the name right now). If your handy it wouldn't hurt to remove the starter and remove the solenoid cover. You will see a round copper plate. On the back side, when removed you will see the contact areas. try cleaning them up and see what happens.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for all the info, I went 130k before I changed the original timing belt and I'll be going until this one snaps. Feel free to highjack away on this thread I got the info I was looking for.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

air- I hear a click but it sounds like it is coming from inside of the cab, unless I am hearing it through the firewall. I guess the starter is on the back side of the motor....It only does it a few times a summer. I only use the car to commute back and forth to work, so I only stop to get gas, and it is usually on a cold engine. (I guarrentee I will be searching for this thread next summer) grin.gif

Thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sounds like that solenoid plate plunger thingy. Its either worn out or severly arc burned. Than can be replace relatively cheaply. Good luck next summer!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0



  • Posts

    • Monkster
      We're a little over a week away from the 6th annual LCRA Ice Fishing contest on Lake Gervais in Little Canada, MN! Lots of great prizes, over $10,000 in prizes and raffle. Grand prize for fishing is a Marcum flasher, a Clam X200 flip over thermal and an Eskimo auger! Come on out Saturday, February 4th, noon to 3pm. Line up early for a good spot, the tent will open by 9am with beverages (alcohol and non-alcohol), food and raffle tickets. The raffle is the LCRA's winter raffle. $5 tickets, grand prize is a trip to Vegas and $1,000 cash! You don't have to be present to win in the raffle, that will be drawn after the prizes for the fishing contest around 4pm that day.   The Little Canada Recreation Association is a non-profit group that raises money to offset registration fees for youth in the Little Canada, Roseville, Maplewood and Vadnais Heights areas. We also fund scout projects, playground equipment and many types of sports equipment for area teams.   For more information on the LCRA or to register for fishing, go to www.lcraonline.org  
    • Cliff Wagenbach
      Thanks Del! Good information source on local conditions! Cliff
    • Fishin machine
      So as far as live bait rigging what works best? Shiners? Suckers? Fatheads? As far as this time of year goes.
    • CousinEddie
      Like someone else said, some of the places with the old school $2-$5 beer and $6-$10 burger pricing have also been owned for a long time and were paid off long ago. According to the county website, the landing has 300+ feet of lakeshore (which isn't cheap), a tax bill that's 3 times what the VC pays, 10 times the dock space to maintain and given that it's was purchased relatively recently, they likely a mortgage to pay. The Crescent is also a relatively recent purchase. But the Crescent has a less expensive location, lower taxes and is more centrally located in terms of road access (important during the 4-5 months of the year when boating and snowmobiling taper off).   Overhead is going to play a role in the pricing of any business. You have your total sales minus your overhead and that's your profit. You can't sell the same thing at the same price with significantly more overhead because you're not going to make any money. Yes, you can offset low margins with a higher number of sales, but with a very short snowmobile season and a relatively short boating season that can be pretty difficult.   I'll be the first to agree that the pricing is on the high side, but the food is also a step up from some of the other options with lake accessibility. My guess is that after evaluating the various price points, the owners decided that the current business model is where they stand the best chance at turning a profit and keeping the doors open. If $2 beers and $5 burgers were a slam dunk way to make money, I'm sure that they'd be doing it because it would be a lot easier.   Whether it be lakeside bars/restaurants or marinas, there are less and less of them every year because the cost of lakeshore and the taxes (which usually increase after a recent sale) make it almost impossible to compete with places that were paid off a generation ago. When these restaurants and marinas close, townhomes and cabins usually replace them so I'm happy to pay the prices if it means another option when it comes to eating or grabbing some drinks on the lake.
    • Bdeanpete
      I see I should have done a more thorough search. The smitty sled looks to be the ideal solution to my issues. Thanks guys. Now I have a project.