Guests - If You want access to member only forums on FM. You will gain access only when you Sign-in or Sign-Up on Fishing Minnesota.

It's easy - LOOK UPPER right menu.

  • Announcements

    • Rick

      Members Only Fluid Forum View   08/08/2017

      Fluid forum view allows members only to get right to the meat of this community; the topics. You can toggle between your preferred forum view just below to the left on the main forum entrance. You will see three icons. Try them out and see what you prefer.   Fluid view allows you, if you are a signed up member, to see the newest topic posts in either all forums (select none or all) or in just your favorite forums (select the ones you want to see when you come to Fishing Minnesota). It keeps and in real time with respect to Topic posts and lets YOU SELECT YOUR FAVORITE FORUMS. It can make things fun and easy. This is especially true for less experienced visitors raised on social media. If you, as a members want more specific topics, you can even select a single forum to view. Let us take a look at fluid view in action. We will then break it down and explain how it works in more detail.   The video shows the topic list and the forum filter box. As you can see, it is easy to change the topic list by changing the selected forums. This view replaces the traditional list of categories and forums.   Of course, members only can change the view to better suit your way of browsing.   You will notice a “grid” option. We have moved the grid forum theme setting into the main forum settings. This makes it an option for members only to choose. This screenshot also shows the removal of the forum breadcrumb in fluid view mode. Fluid view remembers your last forum selection so you don’t lose your place when you go back to the listing. The benefit of this feature is easy to see. It removes a potential barrier of entry for members only. It puts the spotlight on topics themselves, and not the hierarchical forum structure. You as a member will enjoy viewing many forums at once and switching between them without leaving the page. We hope that fluid view, the new functionality is an asset that you enjoy .
Sign in to follow this  
beretta

Rifle Reloading

Recommended Posts

beretta

Hey guys, Im thinking about trying to get into reloading my rifle loads. Im wondering if there is anyone here that does some reloading? Im looking for some advice as far as what equipment to get. I have reloaded 12 ga. shells and understand that concept. What do I need for equiptment? What brands and models should I consider? I am looking at doing mainly 30.06 Thanks for anyhelp you can give me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Gissert

Welcome to the wonderfull world of reloading.

You can spend as much or as little as you want. Warning - it is addicting, and you will probably want to keep adding stuff as you go. Reloading will also lead to more gun purchases grin.gif

RCBS makes a nice starter kit (Rock Chucker)that will come with pretty much everything you need to get started.

Lee also makes some good starter kits, including a neat hand press that you can use on a kitchen table if you dont want to mount a press to a bench or table.

Dillon makes great stuff too, but you will pay for it. Very very nice stuff, but unless you are going to do a lot of volume, not necessary.

Things I have that are not neccessary that I really like are:

Digital RCBS powder dispenser and scale - this is great for getting very accurate powder charges every time without messing with a beam type scale. I set it to dispense slightly under what I want, and then trickle in the last couple tenths of a grain.

Hand priming tool - I just prefer the way these work vs priming with the press. You just get a better "feel".

A case length gage is also nice if your brass comes a little long, or stretches a bit. I use this tool in conjunction with a case trimmer to get my brass to a uniform length.

A dial type micrometer is very nice for checking cartridge overall length once you get your bullets seated.

A standard grade die should be sufficient if you are reloading for a bolt gun. If you are loading for a semi auto, I suggest getting a small base die so your rounds will chamber.

A stuck case puller is nice should you stick a case in the resize die. I have never stuck a 30/06 case, but it happens a fair amount with a semi rimless case like a 220 swift, and I have stuck a case or two on my 338.

A kinetic bullet puller is nice for pulling bullets and powder on loads that did not work out.

Good luck!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Try Too Fish

Gissert bout nailed it! Just as well buy new too unless you have an uncle willing too give you a good deal as used stuff seems too sell close to new!

If used is what you want,Ebay and gun shows always have some stuff!

First decision to make is do you want a progressive or are you content doing one at a time!

I really like the one at a time way. I think you are more consistent!

It really helps if you can get close to someone that reloads and work with them if its totally new to you. They can give you ideas so you know what you like and don't!

A brass tumbler is nice for keeping the brass clean!

And for me i really like the Digital Caliper And Digital scale. They are fast and easy to read so less chance of a goof up!

Good Luck With your new hobbie Or mabey i should say addiction!! grin.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
WalleyeGod

What Gissert said. I will add that it might be a good idea to go see a set up to get ideas. You are welcome to come see mine but I would think there are closer ones for you in your neck of the woods.

I have a Lyman T-Mag ll set up for my main reloading as it is the turret style and like it because I reload for a variety of calibers including the 30-06 and I have a smaller RCBS single stage that is set up mainly for bullet pulling.

I have mentioned to the site administrator that a whole new forum under Hunting be dedicated to Reloading. Lets see how that develops. In the meantime if you have any questions, let us know here. We all will try and help you out.

I have been toying with the idea of putting on a basic rifle reloaders school. No charge, just getting together more or less to discuss reloading and showing newbies how it is done. I am looking to learn more as well. Don't know the interest and I believe they offered something like this at GM or Sportsmans W but it has always been a timing and distance thing. Comments/suggestions ?

Good luck deer hunting, be careful out there. WG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
mechanictim

If you haven't already, get a couple of reloading manuals and get a catalog from MidwayUSA and Dillon's Blue Press. They both have websites but the catalogs are much better to read. Lyman's reloading handbook is a good read for any one considering handloading. If you are going to reload any volume or for multiple calibers the Dillon RL 550 is hard to beat. The really nice thing about Dillon's RL 550 progressive presses is they can also be used like a single stage press with out the hassle of resetting dies for each stage of reloading.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
WalleyeGod

Mech:

I am not familiar with the Dillon's other than knowing they exist. Are the 550's Ok for all calibers and would there be a difference in the progressive vs. one at a time mode per se? I am curious as these sound great for my .223 volume reloading but I also reload larger calibers and wondering if the 550's can do that in the "progressive mode" if you will. I need to check one out as you can tell. WG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
mechanictim

WalleyeGod;

I have the Dillon 550 and reload for about a dozen calibers, both pistol and rifle. For reloading for .223 the 550 is great. I can reload 200 rounds in less than an hour. I load for .45 ACP, .44 REM MAG, .223 REM, .308 WIN and several other calibers including some magnums and even the old .45/70. I check each powder charge on most larger rifle rounds just to make sure they are right on and the 550 usually drops within 2/10's of a grain even up to 95 grains. Changing calibers takes ten minutes (once you have a tool head set up for that caliber.) with most of the time spent adjusting powder charge and setting bullet seating depth. Dillons no B.S. warranty and customer service are amazing.

With a single stage press you need to set each die as you go which means that you have to install and set the sizing/decapping die, size your cases, use a seperate tool to prime each case, then using a powder measure throw each charge into the cases, then pull your sizing die and install and adjust your bullet seating/crimp die.

For doing one caliber the single stage press ( I don't think Dillon offers a single stage press.) can go pretty quick but when you start adding the different calibers the progresive press is much easier and quicker.

Dillon calls thier catalog the Blue Press (Dillon's presses are blue in color.) If you are looking at a progresive reloader this a must read.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
WalleyeGod

Mech: Thanks. I stopped downtown at South Mill and the young fella has one so he gave me a little fill in regarding the 550. Sounds like a good reloader especially for the volume cases. I do have the turrets with the Lyman and they are nice as I just have all the dies in 3 different turrets so I don't end up having to re-set any which is nice, just put on a different turret and away you go. I will be one turret short now that I am putting together a new gun-6mmBR-and just got the dies for that.

I did go to Dillons website and ordered the catalog. Plan on going to see it in operation one day.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
fishtrapgirl

Beretta,

Nobody mentioned much about dies so I will take a stab at it here, I like hornady and forester.

If you just want hunting or average ammo, the hornady dies work great. I like the forester dies for my matchgrade ammo though.

A good scale is a absolute must, dillon/rcbs/hornady can fill the ticket in that department.

Like mentioned earlier, a hand priming tool is alot easier than priming with the press. It lets you feel when the primmer is seated.

Ryan

(husband of fishtrapgirl)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  



  • Posts

    • JB18
      Saw over 10 birds on opener....all before legal shooting hour....Only 1 after before the rain started.
    • JB18
      i went out for a couple hours yesterday looking for grouse.  The buddy i was with never has been hunting for grouse or woodcock.  We only saw 1 grouse with no chance for a shot but got both woodcock that flushed. 
    • Stick in Mud
      As MB said, high water tends to spread fish out and push them tighter to the banks in any slower water they can find.  A "normal" year with low water in October can be ridiculously, almost unfairly good in the river when you find the smallies. There's a reason it's mandatory catch and release now, as they pile up in deeper, slower water and can be quite vulnerable if/when you find them.   That being said, the difference in high vs. low water is not as pronounced above the dams (either the 10th St, Sartell, Little Falls, Blanchard, etc.) as it is below them.  At least in my experience, anyways.  
    • Rick
      The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources has produced six new, state-of-the-art maps that will make it easier and safer for people to explore, hunt, and recreate in state forests.   “The DNR has updated six state forests with 53 more to go,” said Forrest Boe, director of the DNR Forestry Division. “This five-year effort will include updating maps for all of Minnesota’s state forests.” State forest users now have two maps options. A geoPDF map will allow users to download a map onto a mobile device using a variety of map apps and then track their location as a blue dot on the screen. The new user-friendly, paper maps highlight the unique recreation features of each forest and include pop-out maps for popular campgrounds and day-use areas. “The little blue dot that appears on the map on my phone goes with me whether I’m on or off-trail,” said Laura Duffey, DNR state forest map project coordinator. “This feature lets people know exactly where they are in a state forest—no more getting lost.” The maps are also more detailed than previous versions and highlight the endless recreation opportunities in state forests, such as hiking, mountain biking, birding, berry picking, cross-country skiing, hunting, and horseback, ATV and snowmobile riding. Many state forests also offer campgrounds, fishing piers, boat launches, swimming beaches, and picnic areas. The six new maps are available in time for fall hunting and cover more than 240,000 acres of state forest land and thousands of miles of trails. New geoPDF and paper maps are now available for: Paul Bunyan State Forest in Cass and Hubbard counties Badoura State Forest in Cass and Hubbard counties Croix State Forest in Pine County Huntersville State Forest in Cass, Hubbard and Wadena counties Lyons State Forest in Wadena County. Chengwatana State Forest in Pine and Chisago counties The Paul Bunyan and Badoura state forests are popular spots for hunters. Combined, they contain two campgrounds and day-use areas, four off-highway vehicle trails, five wildlife management areas (WMA), two ruffed grouse management areas, and four state game refuges. They also have hiking, biking, snowmobiling and skiing trails. The Huntersville and Lyons state forests are popular with hunters. Each state forest contains four WMAs and several miles of trails and roads for off-highway vehicles. Additionally, the Huntersville State Forest offers two campgrounds, a horse campground, and 24 miles of designated horse trails. The St. Croix State Forest offers a variety of year-round recreation opportunities. It has 20 miles of horseback trails and a horse campground with 56 campsites. In the winter snowmobilers can enjoy 42 miles of trails while in the summer mountain bikers can cruise 25 miles of trails. The Boulder Campground and day-use area has 22 secluded campsites and access to Rock Lake for swimming, fishing and boating. The Chengwatana State Forest contains the Snake River Campground and several miles of off-highway motorcycle and all-terrain vehicle trails. Three state water trails run through the forest: Kettle River, Snake River, and St. Croix River. Snowmobliers also use the Matthew Lourey State Trail, which runs through the forest. The new maps also shows locations of National Park Service campsites along the St. Croix River.Digital, geoPDF maps are available on the state forest’s webpage at www.mndnr.gov/stateforests. People can get a free paper map at a local DNR office or the DNR Info Center by sending an email to info.dnr@state.mn.us or calling 888-646-6367, Monday-Friday 8 a.m.-8 p.m. and Saturdays 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Discuss below - to view set the hook here.
    • smurfy
      sheez................noone's going up this way to chase tree chickens, fishin, or scoutin for deer hunting??????? headed up friday and be up there for the better part of 9-10 days!!!!! some hunting some work!!!!
    • Rick
      Hunters planning to use portable stands on wildlife management areas this season are reminded to check regulations to learn when they need to remove stands after hunting.  “In most of the state, leaving stands overnight on WMAs is not allowed and they must be removed at the end of the day,” said Bob Welsh, Department of Natural Resources wildlife operations manager. “Users of most WMAs will not see a change in stand regulations this year, but there is a change in an area of northwestern Minnesota.” In a specific portion of northwestern Minnesota, new legislation allows portable stands to be left out on WMAs from Nov. 1 through Dec. 31. Minnesota has 1.3 million acres of land in WMAs, and an estimated 500,000 hunters are expected to hit the woods and fields during firearms deer season in hopes of harvesting a deer. New in northwestern Minnesota
      The new regulation allows WMA users to leave up to two portable stands overnight in any WMA in the northwestern corner of the state roughly north of Thief River Falls and west of Warroad. The area also is described as north of Highway 1 where it exits the Red Lake Indian Reservation to the western edge of the state, and west of a line from Highway 89 where it exits the Red Lake Indian Reservation to Fourtown, then north on the west side of Dick’s Parkway Forest Road, then north to Highway 5 to the northern edge of the state. The DNR defines a portable stand as a stationary platform or blind designed and capable of being readily moved by hand by a single person in a single trip without the aid of a motorized vehicle, is secured in position and does no permanent damage to the natural environment. Hunters leaving a stand overnight must label the stand with the hunter’s name and address; the hunter’s driver’s license number; or simply with the hunter’s MDNR number. The label must be readable from the ground. WMAs elsewhere in Minnesota
      In WMAs in the remainder of the state, stands cannot be left overnight. “Every year we have people leaving stands overnight on WMAs, so it’s a common violation,” said Greg Salo, assistant director of the DNR Enforcement Division. “We have this regulation in place to prevent some users from preempting others from the opportunity to use WMAs on a first-come, first-served basis.” Portable stands may be used on WMAs if they are removed each day at the close of shooting hours and do no permanent damage. Spikes or nails driven into trees are not allowed, but screwing or clamping devices are allowed if removed each day at the close of shooting hours. “In addition to WMAs, there are a variety of other public land types and hunters should be aware that regulations governing the use of portable stands can differ depending on the type of public land they’re hunting,” Salo said. Hunters should always wear a safety harness if using an elevated stand, added Salo. “In addition to wearing a safety harness, check climbing sticks, steps or ladders for damage and always wait to load a firearm until safely in the stand,” Salo said. Hunters need to be familiar with hunting regulations, which are available at any DNR license agent or online at mndnr.gov/regulations/hunting. Hunting questions should be directed to the DNR Information Center at 651-296-6157 or 888-646-6367, from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. weekdays and 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays. Discuss below - to view set the hook here.
    • Rick
      Deer: The animal Adult female white-tailed deer weigh about 145 lbs., and males weigh about 170 lbs. The biggest white-tailed deer recorded in Minnesota was a 500-pound buck. A whitetail’s home range is about 1 square mile. Deer hunting There are nearly 500,000 firearms deer hunters in Minnesota. Last year, 32 percent of Minnesota firearm hunters successfully harvested a deer. About 61 percent were antlered bucks. 70 percent of Minnesota’s firearms deer harvest typically occurs during the first three or four days of the season. The average hunter spends five days afield during Minnesota’s firearms deer season. The highest deer harvests occurred during the early to mid-1990s and from 2000 to 2008. From 2000 to 2008 the harvest topped 200,000 deer each year. The high harvests in the early 2000s occurred at a time when the overriding philosophy was to reduce the deer population so it wouldn’t grow out of control and to address certain environmental, economic and social concerns. Harvests in the 1970s never topped 100,000, while harvests in the 1980s were under 150,000. In 2016, the harvest was just over 173,000. Deer licenses In total, about 604,000 deer hunting licenses and permits (all types) were sold in 2016. The three primary types of deer hunting seasons are firearms, muzzleloader and archery. Firearms season opens on Saturday, Nov. 4; muzzleloader on Saturday, Nov. 25; and archery season opened on Sept. 16. The DNR Information Center last year extended hours until 8 p.m. and received nearly 1,300 inquiries the day before last year’s firearms deer opener. Most questions were related to the upcoming deer season. Hunting economics* Deer are the number-one hunted species in Minnesota and deer hunters along with other hunters and wildlife watchers together contribute more than $1.3 billion each year to the economy. All hunting-related expenditures in Minnesota totaled $725 million. Trip-related expenses such as food, lodging and transportation were $235 million. Hunters spent $400 million on equipment. Hunters spent $90 million on other items such as magazines, membership dues, licenses, permits, land leasing and ownership. * From the 2011 National Survey of Fishing, Hunting and Wildlife-Associated Recreation, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (census.gov/prod/www/fishing.html). Deer management in Minnesota The DNR is entrusted to manage the deer herd on behalf of, and for, the benefit of all Minnesotans. Hunters help manage deer populations, and hunting also is a tool used to control deer diseases, including chronic wasting disease. Opinions on how deer should be managed are diverse, and the DNR values all opinions. Deer population management affects many other natural resources. More information on deer and deer management can be found at mndnr.gov/deer. Discuss below - to view set the hook here.
    • Rick
      With nearly 500,000 firearms deer hunters in the state, the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources encourages hunters to purchase their licenses early to avoid long lines and any potential system issues associated with the high sales volume.  The 2017 Minnesota firearms deer season begins a half-hour before sunrise on Saturday, Nov. 4. “Buying a deer license early gives you more time to pack that tater tot hotdish for deer camp, and do everything else associated with your deer hunting tradition,” said Steve Michaels, DNR licensing program director. “Every year people do wait until the last minute and last year we sold more than 140,000 licenses the Thursday and Friday before opener.” Deer licenses can be purchased at DNR license agents across Minnesota, by phone at 888-665-4236 or online at mndnr.gov/buyalicense. There are additional fees for telephone and internet transactions. Deer licenses and tags ordered by phone and internet take three to five business days to arrive, so hunters who choose these options should allow enough time for delivery. Hunters must have a valid deer license in their possession when hunting deer. Hunters need to be familiar with deer hunting regulations, which are available at any DNR license agent or online at mndnr.gov/regulations/hunting. Hunting questions should be directed to the DNR Information Center at 651-296-6157 or 888-646-6367, from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. weekdays and 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays. Discuss below - to view set the hook here.
    • Rick
      Volunteers have through October to apply to join one of the citizen-agency work groups that discuss how the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources manages fish.  There are individual work groups for bass, catfish, panfish and walleye, and one focused on both northern pike and muskellunge. New members are needed for all of these work groups except the panfish group. “We still need more applicants for the bass and catfish groups. Otherwise, we have been getting decent interest since we started taking applications in early October,” said Don Pereira, DNR fisheries chief. Volunteers can apply to one of the groups through Monday, Oct. 30. Each group of about 15 people will include volunteers and DNR staff who meet two or three times per year to discuss new research, population, harvest trends and fisheries management. Meetings average three to four hours, not including travel time. Applicants must be Minnesota residents age 18 or older. Participants will be selected by the DNR and can serve a term of either two or three years. The groups are advisory and do not make decisions on policy or fish management. For more information or an application form, visit mndnr.gov/fishgroups or call 651-259-5182. Discuss below - to view set the hook here.
    • Rick
      Hunters in permit area 603 taking part in the early antlerless-only or youth deer hunting seasons are required to have their deer tested for chronic wasting disease and cannot move an adult deer carcass out of the permit area until a negative test result is received.  The antlerless-only and youth deer hunts take place from Thursday, Oct. 19, to Sunday, Oct. 22, in several permit areas including permit area 603, southeastern Minnesota’s CWD management zone. “The CWD management zone is included in these antlerless-only hunting opportunities as a way to reduce the deer population in the zone and limit the spread of CWD,” said Erik Hildebrand, CWD project coordinator. All hunters in permit area 603 must have their deer tested for CWD and cannot move the carcass out of the permit area until a negative test result is received. Properly cut-up deer and boned-out meat can be taken out of the area provided no brain matter or spinal column material is attached. Head collection boxes will be located in: Chatfield: Magnum Sports, 1 1st St., 507-867-4399. Preston: DNR area forestry office, 912 Houston St., 507-765-2740. Lanesboro: DNR area fisheries office, 23789 Grosbeak Road, 507-467-2442. Wykoff: Goodies and Gas, 104 E Front St., 507-352-2421. Harmony: Oak Meadow Meats, 50 9th St., 507-886-6328. Hunters should do the following: Field dress (gut) deer as normal. Register deer via phone, internet or walk-in big game registration station. If harvest occurs late in the day, sample (head) submission and registration do not have to occur on the same day. If the deer will be mounted, a video showing how to properly cape your deer is available at bitly.com/capeadeer. Remove the head, leaving at least 4 inches of neck attached. Hunters can take meat out of the zone immediately but the carcass (head with brain and spinal column) cannot be moved outside deer permit area 603 until a negative test result is received so hunters must:  Make arrangements to refrigerate the carcass before the deer is processed. Cut deer into quarters or other pieces; or Bone-out the meat. Ensure no spinal column or brain matter is included with the meat or on the antlers. Properly dispose of carcass remains by keeping these away from scavengers until test negative results are received. There will be a dumpster at the DNR forestry office in Preston for hunters who don’t have a way to dispose of remains. The Preston dumpster is being provided as a courtesy for deer carcass disposal only. It will be removed if people attempt to process deer there or use the dumpster for trash disposal. Bring the entire head of the deer to one of five head box collection sites. Each collection box has specific instructions on how to properly submit the head for sampling. Put heads in the plastic bags provided. Use the maps provided at each box to mark an “X” where the deer was harvested. Submit this map with sample. Samples during the archery, youth deer and antlerless only seasons will be submitted for testing on Mondays and Thursdays. It may take up to four business days for test results to be available. CWD test results can be searched using a nine-digit MDNR number online at mndnr.gov/cwdcheck. Deer hunters should regularly check the DNR’s CWD webpage at mndnr.gov/cwd for the most recent information. More information about youth and antlerless-only hunts can be found in the Minnesota Hunting and Trapping Regulations Handbook at mndnr.gov/regulations/hunting. Discuss below - to view set the hook here.