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Semi-auto sticking-oil recommendation

24 posts in this topic

With the cooler temps. I'm having a problem with my Browning gold hunter sticking after the first shot and not fully chambering the second shell. I have a feeling I have a lot of junk and layers of oil Rem-oil caked in the mechanisms. Is there a good product to remove all the old oil and starting fresh with a thin coating of something new?

Thanks

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I'm not a fan of the Browning Gold and don't know a whole lot about the mechanism, but even as a Remington guy I'll tell you to throw that Rem Oil away (or at least not use it on moving parts). Buy Birchwood Casey Gun Scrubber and blast everything clean and let dry. Use LPS-1 (available in hardware sections) or a similar DRYING type lubricant that won't gum up in cool weather on the moving parts.

Good Luck. I know of some guys with Browning Golds that sold them because they jammed no matter what. Hopefully you don't have one that works like that!

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Straight forward WD40.

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I 2nd WD40 works wonders, I started using it on my semi-auto and have not had it lock up on me yet...

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As you probably already know, you want to go easy when applying any aerosol (or other type) gun oil.

I've had good luck with Rem Oil, WD-40, Hoppe's, etc., by simply spraying (or pouring) oil on a cotton cloth and wiping it over exposed surfaces.

On less accessible areas of the gun's action, lightly mist with the aerosol, don't overspray.

Good luck! smile.gif

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A guy I had out hunting this week has the same problem until we cleaned it very good and make sure you clean out the gas port with fine wire and then spray a light coat on of WD40. Not a problem after that. Gas port hole is very imp[ortant. CAJ

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That gun is relatively easy to tear down (take barrel off and remove action pin/pull action out). I would tear it down and thoroughly clean the action and chamber areas.

Buy a can of Gun Scrubber and clean everything thoroughly. The solvent stinks, so don't do it inside your home. I have also used Carb Cleaner in a pinch with great results also.

IMO, WD-40 is not going to break down the oils, residues and gunk. Have tried that in a pinch and the problem re-occured fairly quickly.

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Break-Free CLP seems to work OK for me, but I don't have the same gun.

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Use WD-40.

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I've never had a problem with Autos as I keep them clean and "lightly" lubed. Remember that too much lube attracts dirt.

I've been using Break-Free CLP. It is really slick, really thin, and dosen't seem to attract dirt.

This is from their site.

When the United States Military issued PD-48, a purchase description of properties for a single, multi-purpose product to maintain their weaponry, it became known as the "impossible specification" because of its severe requirements. The first product to meet the challenge - Break-Free CLP.

Break-Free's flagship product, CLP is a unique formulation of synthetic oils and individual proprietary ingredients which synergize in combination to do three important tasks simultaneously: Effectively Clean, Lubricate and Protect metal. After years of rigorous testing, CLP actually exceeded the Military's requirements and was approved as a product to meet MIL-L-63460, a new specification. Break-Free CLP is now recognized around the world as the standard by which maximum metal performance and protection is ensured.

* Penetrates and spreads along metal surfaces into every pit and crevice to undercut contamination and lift residue away where it can be removed.

* Long-lasting lubricating film dramatically reduces adhesion of sand, grit or other abrasives which cause wear and failure.

* Corrosion inhibitors prevent the formation of rust while Break-Free's unique boundary film protects metal surfaces from moisture and other contaminants.

* Specially formulated synthetic oils won't lose viscosity, dry out or stiffen up in extreme environments - such as cold, heat, dust, dirt, humidity and even salt air - keeping equipment in ready condition for months at a time.

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Tear your gun down and clean everything well. Get rid of the Rem Oil.. that stuff is nothing but trouble in cold temperatures.

The key is keeping everything clean, and excess oil is a magnet for grime and it turns into sludge real quick when its cold out.

Clean your gun thouroughly.. dont miss anything. Try *Dry Slide* for a lubricant which is a graphite powder, or use a light coat of quality gun oil.. take your gun apart and clean it after every trip.

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After having repaired many a gun, I would recommend giving the gun a GOOD cleaning, make sure the gas port is completely free of restriction, and use CLP to lube and maintaing your Browning between cleanings. As stated earlier, you should clean it after every use, but not everyone takes the time so CLP is a good back-up. WD-40 is not a good choice. I have seen to many guns with rusty barrels because someone told the owner to use it to help maintain the gun. It gun oils are designed to work with the blueing to protect the metals and WD-40 seems to break down the blueing. If you do not feel comfortable breaking the gun down and cleaning it, take it to a good gun smith in your area. It doesn't cost very much.

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I had the same problem with my Gold Hunter.

The grease in the return spring in the stock is too heavy. When it's cold it gums up and the spring doesn't work as well.

You need to pull the spring out of the stock and clean it then apply a lighter lubricant.

Be carfull, the spring is under extreme pressure. I brought it to a gun smith to do it.

I still use my Gold Hunter but I make sure I have a back up just in case. It seems like there are too many just in cases with mine.

Good luck with your Gold Hunter. No disrespect, but your going to need it.

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seems like i'm not the only one with the same problem. For me every rime i go thru a 1 1/2 boxes of shells (sooner in cold weather) i have to break my gun down and give it a thorough cleaning. Were exactly is the gas port on the GWH? maybe i'm not focusing enough on that. since i've tried just about everything else that was mentioned here including taking and cleaning the tension spring.

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At duck camp there was some rem oil on the table were everyone was cleaning their guns so I put some on my bolt slides crazy.gif after the first 2 drops I said noway cleaned it out and used some hoppes. but it did work good on those squeaky oarlocks grin.gif

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Rem Oil is excellent for storing the gun and protecting the finish. Its just not the type lube you want for the moving parts...

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You may want to see if they make a heavier return spring.

I took mine in 2 years ago and had the spring replaced and the gas compensator spring replaced and haven't had any problems since.

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Personally, I wouldn't use wd-40 anywhere near any of my guns. It might work for a while, but will hang on to all sorts of junk and eventually gum up the action.

I agree with the use of the break free, good stuff. I also had a small bottle of some lube called Tri-Flow that I really liked, but can't find anymore of it. Rem Lube I don't like, and Rem oil is good for non-moving parts.

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Where do you guys get Break-Free at?

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I got mine at Gander.

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I don't know where to find it anymore since I still have the can that I bought years ago, but it is called Tri Flon and has microscopic teflon beads in it and it works great. I don't use it anymore because my Benelli doesn't have the problem with hanging up when it is cold. shocked.gifgrin.gifwink.gif

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Lawdog is right that this gun is a sticky one. I own one for turkey hunting, and the rear spring that pushes the action forward can weaken over time. This is true especially if you store it with the action open.....nono!Might want to look into that.

I tend to have to break mine down and scrub, then re-oil with a light coat of the birchwood casey product at least once per turkey season.

Joel

Joel

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TRITC,

I bought my Break Free at Wal-mart.

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Believe it or not gasoline or white gas works realy well.Hunted with a guy for many years that used it to lube his 1100,never jamed no matter what type of load he used.Hunted in close to zero temps in late season duck hunts.At our buisness we have had to have some of our cnc machinery rebuilt,the guy that works on the machines allways uses white gas to to clean and at asembly.Says it does leave some lubricating film but is realy light.Burl.

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