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dodger31

Ice augers

24 posts in this topic

The wife finally broke down and will let me buy a new auger this year. Any of you gentleman had any good/bad luck on the strike lite or 224 by Strikemaster? I have a couple of buddies with Jiffy Stealths and they seem to bog down a lot. Any thoughts?

Dodger31

Thanks for your help

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Go with the best and get a Nils Master. Super light, fast and long enough where I havent used a extention in 2 years.

Heck the hand auger is faster than some power augers.

I wouldnt get the 224 unless you re open a lot of holes. Extra blades are pricey. The 4 stroke is nice but who wants to worry about how you lay it down without oil leaking?

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Two words "Strike Master"

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Yep...two words.....

NILS MASTER - The fastest lightest 2 stroke auger currently on the market laugh.gif

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I had the joy of using a Nils one time and all I will say is it was the lightest,fastest,sweetest auger I have ever drilled holes with.Very nice unit. cool.gifcool.gif

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GREAT!!! I have enjoyed my Strikemaster. Light and fast.

Now I got to look at the Nils because of these posts. This unit could be better. Oh well, the kids can go to a VOTECH

instead.

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Il have to check them out as well. Whats the price on them?

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Thanks to everyone. They are pricey, but you usually get what you pay for on big ticket items like that. Bass'n Spear, they are pushing $500. I will definitely be checking out the Nils Master soon. Can't wait for hard water!

Dodger31

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Nils now offers a blade exchange and sharpening in house. $15 I was told.

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500, thats alot of money!! Going to have to ry and sell some more boats. Thanks Guys

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Look around on here I think they had a sale on them at one of the forum sponsors.

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Ill have to keep my eyes open and watch for a good deal.

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I've had a Strike Master for at least 10 years and I've hauled it around in the truck, on the snowmobile, banged it around and it is like the energizer ice bunny it keeps drilling and drilling and drilling. I'd buy another in a minute.

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Strike Master!! Value and quality in one machine. You can't say that about much these days!!

"Your Bobbers Down!"

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Strike Master hands down! Awesome unit, and even better customer service should you need anything!!!!

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Quote:

Strike Master hands down! Awesome unit, and even better customer service should you need anything!!!!


EXACTLY.......I love strikemster augers and their customer service!! I was there today getting blades and have them check something......they put a new cover on my auger, retuned it, added some carb cleaner, and changed my blades all for the price of the blade change. Always take care of me right on the spot. Great people!!!! Oh and the auger, my friends that have jiffy augers and have used mine all wish they had bought strikemaster or have bought strikemaster!!!!!!

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LaserMag since 94 tough as nails.It just runs...........

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Gotta love the strike masters.

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Northlander,

Thanks for the info on Nils Master. I ended up buying one and I am very happy with it. The blade is very sharp. and the hand auger handle is a good deal for early ice. I'm happy with my decision. Good fishin this winter!

Dodger

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Dodger31 you will love it. It will get better the more you break it in. I think mine hit top speed after about the 3rd or 4th tank of gas.

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I have to agree with the Strike Master! I have had mine for almost 17 years and have drill thousands of holes, and the only thing that has gone wrong with it was my fault! (I didnt stabilize the fuel and had to have the carb rebuilt). Matter of fact I just bought a new one this week at D-Rock in New Brighten. Extremly nice people that havent forgot the words "Customer Service"! Got the old one fixed for my boys when they want to borrow a auger! Ha ha!

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The only problem with Strikemaster is they keep coming out with new models and the new ones are better than the old. I have to buy the new one as soon as it comes out so now I have the 4 stroke and I won't buy another auger because you can't beat this one. No smoke in the fish house and quiet... It is great.

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STRIKE MASTER....I bought mine used four years ago for $125....runs like new, first pull starts, never had it freeze up.....we used it two years ago when it was -45 below at Rainy River....others are fancier or more expensive, but I'd save that cash for bait, beer, or women! grin.gif

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Has anyone ever been to one of Eddy's rental fish houses on Mille Lacs? I heard they use Husqvarna... I know Husqy makes great chain saws! I handled one of their ice augers, it seemed very comfortable.

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  • Posts

    • Cliff Wagenbach

      Posted

      The trees are turning color fast now! Seems to gain color by the hour now!

      Cliff

    • Driving a scenic route through a state forest is a great way to view fall color, according to the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources.  

      Finland State Forest

      Finland State Forest

      “Routes through hilly or rugged areas dominated by deciduous trees tend to have the best mix of color,” said Jennifer Teegarden, DNR forestry outreach specialist. “And the dark green needles of conifers accent the yellow, orange and red leaves of deciduous trees in mixed forest.”

      Here are a few state forests routes to consider:

      Late September

      • Finland State Forest heading northeast along County Road 7 from Finland.

      Early October

      • Bowstring and Blackduck state forests along state Highway 46 between Deer River and Northome.
      • Pillsbury State Forest along Beauty Lake Forest Road between County Road 77 and County Road 1.
      • St. Croix and Nemadji state forests loop. From Interstate 35, take exit #183 and head east on state Highway 48. Head north on County Road 24. Head east on County Road 24. At Markville, head north on County Road 31. Head west on Park Forest Road. At Kerrick, head south on state Highway 23 to Interstate 35 exit #195.

      Mid-October

      • Richard J. Dorer Memorial Hardwood State Forest has two good options. Along Zumbro Bottoms Road off of state Highway 60 southwest of Wabasha. Along state Highway 16 between Interstate 90 and state Highway 26.

      Visit www.mndnr.gov/stateforests for information about visiting a state forest and additional scenic routes. Entrance into a state forest is free. State forest campsites are available on a first-come, first-served basis for $14 a night.

      Visit the Minnesota state parks and trails Fall Color Finder at www.mndnr.gov/fall_colors to find areas in Minnesota with peak fall color. The Fall Color Finder is updated every Thursday through the end of October.

      Discuss below - to view set the hook here.

    • A southeastern Minnesota stream reflects brilliantly colored leaves in fall – until the splash of a trout on the end of an angler’s line breaks the surface. Anglers can enjoy scenes like these now through a variety of fall trout fishing opportunities.  

      north-branch-whitewater-river_govdelivery2“Fall is a beautiful time to experience trout fishing in streams in southeastern Minnesota,” said Brian Nerbonne, stream habitat consultant with the Department of Natural Resources. “Anglers are fewer, the scenery can be awe inspiring and fishing can be quite good.”

      In most of the state, trout fishing is open until Friday, Sept. 30. However, anglers can make a longer go at it in southeastern Minnesota streams.

      Catch-and-release trout fishing is open through Saturday, Oct. 15, on streams in the southeastern Minnesota counties of Dodge, Fillmore, Goodhue, Houston, Mower, Olmsted, Wabasha and Winona. In these counties, fishing then reopens for a winter catch-and-release season that runs Sunday, Jan. 1, to Friday, April 14, 2017.

      For even more fishing, anglers who want to trout fish all year long can do so in streams in Beaver Creek Valley, Forestville and Whitewater state parks, whether through a catch-and-release or harvest season depending on the time of year.

      “If you think trout are hard to catch in winter, consider the research over the last year that shows trout continue to feed heavily in winter,” Nerbonne said. “Different teams of researchers found trout with anywhere from 30 to more than 100 prey items in their stomachs, depending on the study.”

      Vaughn Snook, Lanesboro assistant area fisheries supervisor, said numbers of brown trout longer than 12 inches are at record highs or close to it on some trout streams in southeastern Minnesota.

      “Now is the time to take advantage of those great fish. Numbers of young trout look good for coming years,” Snook said.

      Reports of anglers using hopper patterns (grasshopper imitating flies) have been good in areas thick with grass. Grasshoppers will become active, and thus more likely to fall into the stream, as the sun warms their bodies in the afternoon. Blue-winged olive hatches (try using no. 20-22 olive mayfly) will be seen until the first frost, sometimes even after.

      Because both brown trout and brook trout become aggressive in the fall, closer to their spawning time, anglers should also consider presenting streamers (minnow imitating flies) in deep runs and pools.

      “Numerous brown trout over 20 inches have been reportedly caught by anglers already this late summer and fall period,” Snook said.

      Minnesota has 3,817 miles of designated trout streams, plus 2,699 miles of designated trout stream tributaries. In 2015, the state’s five coldwater hatcheries produced 1.7 million fingerlings, yearlings and adult fish for stocking in 75 streams and 158 lakes – roughly 201 tons of fish. Last year, 106,463 anglers purchased a validation required to fish for trout, an all-time high. However, fewer anglers tend to fish in the fall.

      Anglers fishing on designated trout waters must have a trout stamp in addition to an angling license. Maps showing trout fishing locations in southern Minnesota, as well as other information on trout fishing, can be found at www.mndnr.gov/fishing/trout_streams.

      Discuss below - to view set the hook here.

    • Hunters who were not chosen in the lottery to receive an antlerless deer permit can obtain one of 12 surplus antlerless permits for deer permit area 260, which covers the northwest corner of Minnesota and borders North Dakota and Manitoba. 

      Permits will be available starting 5 p.m. Monday, Oct. 3, on a first come, first served basis, anywhere DNR licenses are sold, or online on the buy a license page. Both residents and nonresidents can purchase these permits but must first purchase a firearms or muzzleloader deer license. Permits purchased online will be mailed. Orders by telephone will not be accepted.

      In lottery deer areas, including permit area 260, firearm and muzzleloader license holders who intend to take an antlerless deer must possess an antlerless permit; otherwise, they are restricted to hunting bucks. The total bag limit for deer in lottery areas is one deer per year.

      To stay informed about the deer management and other important deer-related topics visit the deer page and to receive updates via email, consider subscribing to the Deer Notes email list by entering an email address at the bottom of the page.

      The DNR works to protect and maintain Minnesota’s white-tailed deer. The deer population, which varies in density from place to place and year to year, is dependent on adequate habitat and directly influenced by the severity of winter weather. Deer are ecologically, socially and economically important in a state where hunting and wildlife watching generate more than $1.3 billion in annual economic impacts.

      Discuss below - to view set the hook here.

    • Pheasant hunting can put food on the table, supports grassland conservation and is a fun sport that doesn’t require a lot of specialized or expensive equipment.

      Once you’ve identified some areas you might hunt – the hunting usually takes place in grasslands or frozen wetlands – there are a few things to consider to make the most of time in the field once the Minnesota pheasant season opens on Saturday, Oct. 15.

      Here are some tips from the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources.

      Regulations handbook and hunting license
      A small game license and pheasant stamp are required. Hunting regulations are covered in the 2016 Minnesota Hunting and Trapping Regulations Handbook. Licenses are available at the buy a license page  or in person at any DNR license vendor, and handbooks are also available there or online at the hunting regulations page. Hunting licenses are also available by phone, any time, by calling 888-665-4236. Don’t forget a $3 Walk-In Access validation, so you can hunt another 23,000-plus acres of private land.

      Maps
      Scouting an area will increase your odds of finding pheasants and good maps will help your efforts. Visit the wildlife management areas page for free online, interactive maps that identify wildlife management areas and Walk-In Access areas. Combined, these programs provide over 400,000 acres of public hunting land in Minnesota’s farmland zone. A local plat book may also come in handy to identify specific pieces of land.

      Shotgun and shells
      The best shotgun is one you are comfortable with. The style or gauge isn’t nearly as important as your ability to use it. Since pheasants are fairly tough birds, choose a load such as 4 or 5 shot and limit your shooting distances to 40 yards or less. This will result in fewer wounded birds. Nontoxic shot is required on federal land and many hunters prefer to use it any time they’re in the field.

      Blaze orange
      Minnesota pheasant hunters are required to wear at least one visible article of clothing above the waist that is blaze orange. This could be a hat, jacket or hunting vest. Consider that the more blaze orange you wear, the more visible you’ll be to other hunters.

      Good footwear  
      Pheasant hunting involves lots of walking on uneven terrain. Good quality, above-the-ankle shoes or boots will provide comfort and support for a day in the field. Since crossing creeks and marshy areas is common, many hunters prefer waterproof boots.

      Layered clothing
      Cool fall mornings often turn into sunny, warm afternoons. Layered clothing will prepare you for a variety of weather conditions. Long sleeves and gloves will help keep you from getting scratched up when moving through tall grass, cattails or woody cover. Hunting chaps or brush pants are an option to protect your legs and keep you dry on mornings when the grass is wet.

      Eye and ear protection
      Any time you use a firearm, protect your eyes and ears. Sunglasses and foam ear plugs provide basic protection. More expensive options include coated, colored, high impact lenses and digital hearing aids that enhance some sounds while protecting ears from loud noises.

      A good dog
      A dog is not required to hunt pheasants, but a good hunting dog will be a companion in the field and increase chances to harvest and recover birds. Be aware that owning a hunting dog is a year-round commitment of care and training. Be sure you’re willing to invest significant time and energy before taking on the responsibility of a dog.

      Refreshments
      Be sure to carry at least two bottles of water in the field and have jugs of water at your vehicle. Water your dog and yourself, often. Bring snacks to keep your energy level up and consider canine energy bars for your dog.

      Finally, grassland habitat is the key to supporting pheasant populations, and much work remains to improve pheasant habitat in Minnesota. The grasslands that support pheasants have multiple important benefits for people, other wildlife, pollinators, water quality and local economies.

      To learn more about pheasant hunting, as well as about what the DNR and partner organizations are doing to improve pheasant habitat, visit the pheasant page.

      Discuss below - to view set the hook here.

    • Minnesotans who would like to serve on committees that review how the Department of Natural Resources spends Game and Fish Fund dollars are welcome to submit an application by Monday, Oct. 10. 

      The DNR is seeking at least 12 people to serve on the Fisheries Oversight and Wildlife Oversight committees. Appointees will be responsible for reviewing the agency’s annual Game and Fish Fund Report in detail and, following discussions with agency leaders and others, write a report on the findings of this review. About half of the current members’ terms expire on Wednesday, Dec. 14, and are subject to this open application.

      The two committees are comprised of members identified through a self-nomination process. Those who want to serve on the committees should have a strong interest in natural resource management and how it is funded. DNR Commissioner Tom Landwehr will appoint committee members for three-year terms. Applications are being accepted online until Oct. 10.

      Though not well known, Minnesota’s Game and Fish Fund is the fiscal foundation for much of the state’s core natural resource management functions. Upwards of $95 million a year is deposited into this fund from hunting and fishing license sales, federal excise taxes on hunting and fishing equipment and related items, and a portion of a sales tax equivalent on state lottery tickets. The dollars that flow into this fund pay for the fish, wildlife, enforcement, and ecological management that support 48,000 jobs in Minnesota’s outdoor recreation and hospitality business.

      Interested applicants can learn more by reviewing past Game and Fish Fund reports on the game and fish oversight page.

      Discuss below - to view set the hook here.

    • SkunkedAgain

      Posted

      Yup, some sparse reds here and there but trees are definitely turning yellow and some dropping leaves already. Beautiful

    • SkunkedAgain

      Posted (edited)

      Maybe there is a market out there for higher end food on Vermilion. If I were in the restaurant business and felt that way, I would probably operate that restaurant on the other end of the lake where it stands out from the competition and benefits from the higher population density and bigger cabins/wealth.

      In my mind, what the west end has always wanted is a fun place to hang out, get a beer, and swap fishing tales. You don't need $20 bloody mary's to do that or $12 burgers. Most people would be happy with a Heggie's pizza, some wings, or nachos with melted cheese....accompanied by a mug of Schells/Leinie's/Bud and your occasional can or bottle of something more fancy like a Surly. No need to make this a high-end sushi joint or something that it's really not.

      Those seeking a fancy meal will seek it out as necessary. The masses will just avoid the joint if it isn't to their liking.

      Edited by SkunkedAgain
    • BSLNORTH

      Posted

      We did pretty well duck hunting and I thought there was a lot of shooting around. Spent a few hours in the woods checking stands and didn't see one grouse. Lots of deer sign.

    • rundrave

      Posted

      I think you need to go back to basics. What you are trying to do doesn't have to be reinforced in just the boat.

      You need that dog to obey and listen to each command you give. If you are trying to get her to sit/stay then that's what you need to work on.

      You can practice and work on that command every time you open the door to the kennel to let the dog out. You tell her to sit/stay and you open the door. If she doesn't you know close the door and repeat.

      Every time you give your dog a bowl of food don't just give it to her make her sit/stay before she get its. There are  varieties of situation that the sit command can be used for. Start with small exercises and work your way up to bigger more complicated tasks, repetition, repetition repetition. Be sure to praise and always try to end work on a positive note. 

      I think the most important thing is don't give a command you cant reinforce.



  • Posts

    • Cliff Wagenbach
      The trees are turning color fast now! Seems to gain color by the hour now! Cliff
    • Rick
      Driving a scenic route through a state forest is a great way to view fall color, according to the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources.   Finland State Forest “Routes through hilly or rugged areas dominated by deciduous trees tend to have the best mix of color,” said Jennifer Teegarden, DNR forestry outreach specialist. “And the dark green needles of conifers accent the yellow, orange and red leaves of deciduous trees in mixed forest.” Here are a few state forests routes to consider: Late September Finland State Forest heading northeast along County Road 7 from Finland. Early October Bowstring and Blackduck state forests along state Highway 46 between Deer River and Northome. Pillsbury State Forest along Beauty Lake Forest Road between County Road 77 and County Road 1. St. Croix and Nemadji state forests loop. From Interstate 35, take exit #183 and head east on state Highway 48. Head north on County Road 24. Head east on County Road 24. At Markville, head north on County Road 31. Head west on Park Forest Road. At Kerrick, head south on state Highway 23 to Interstate 35 exit #195. Mid-October Richard J. Dorer Memorial Hardwood State Forest has two good options. Along Zumbro Bottoms Road off of state Highway 60 southwest of Wabasha. Along state Highway 16 between Interstate 90 and state Highway 26. Visit www.mndnr.gov/stateforests for information about visiting a state forest and additional scenic routes. Entrance into a state forest is free. State forest campsites are available on a first-come, first-served basis for $14 a night. Visit the Minnesota state parks and trails Fall Color Finder at www.mndnr.gov/fall_colors to find areas in Minnesota with peak fall color. The Fall Color Finder is updated every Thursday through the end of October. Discuss below - to view set the hook here.
    • Rick
      A southeastern Minnesota stream reflects brilliantly colored leaves in fall – until the splash of a trout on the end of an angler’s line breaks the surface. Anglers can enjoy scenes like these now through a variety of fall trout fishing opportunities.   “Fall is a beautiful time to experience trout fishing in streams in southeastern Minnesota,” said Brian Nerbonne, stream habitat consultant with the Department of Natural Resources. “Anglers are fewer, the scenery can be awe inspiring and fishing can be quite good.” In most of the state, trout fishing is open until Friday, Sept. 30. However, anglers can make a longer go at it in southeastern Minnesota streams. Catch-and-release trout fishing is open through Saturday, Oct. 15, on streams in the southeastern Minnesota counties of Dodge, Fillmore, Goodhue, Houston, Mower, Olmsted, Wabasha and Winona. In these counties, fishing then reopens for a winter catch-and-release season that runs Sunday, Jan. 1, to Friday, April 14, 2017. For even more fishing, anglers who want to trout fish all year long can do so in streams in Beaver Creek Valley, Forestville and Whitewater state parks, whether through a catch-and-release or harvest season depending on the time of year. “If you think trout are hard to catch in winter, consider the research over the last year that shows trout continue to feed heavily in winter,” Nerbonne said. “Different teams of researchers found trout with anywhere from 30 to more than 100 prey items in their stomachs, depending on the study.” Vaughn Snook, Lanesboro assistant area fisheries supervisor, said numbers of brown trout longer than 12 inches are at record highs or close to it on some trout streams in southeastern Minnesota. “Now is the time to take advantage of those great fish. Numbers of young trout look good for coming years,” Snook said. Reports of anglers using hopper patterns (grasshopper imitating flies) have been good in areas thick with grass. Grasshoppers will become active, and thus more likely to fall into the stream, as the sun warms their bodies in the afternoon. Blue-winged olive hatches (try using no. 20-22 olive mayfly) will be seen until the first frost, sometimes even after. Because both brown trout and brook trout become aggressive in the fall, closer to their spawning time, anglers should also consider presenting streamers (minnow imitating flies) in deep runs and pools. “Numerous brown trout over 20 inches have been reportedly caught by anglers already this late summer and fall period,” Snook said. Minnesota has 3,817 miles of designated trout streams, plus 2,699 miles of designated trout stream tributaries. In 2015, the state’s five coldwater hatcheries produced 1.7 million fingerlings, yearlings and adult fish for stocking in 75 streams and 158 lakes – roughly 201 tons of fish. Last year, 106,463 anglers purchased a validation required to fish for trout, an all-time high. However, fewer anglers tend to fish in the fall. Anglers fishing on designated trout waters must have a trout stamp in addition to an angling license. Maps showing trout fishing locations in southern Minnesota, as well as other information on trout fishing, can be found at www.mndnr.gov/fishing/trout_streams. Discuss below - to view set the hook here.
    • Rick
      Hunters who were not chosen in the lottery to receive an antlerless deer permit can obtain one of 12 surplus antlerless permits for deer permit area 260, which covers the northwest corner of Minnesota and borders North Dakota and Manitoba.  Permits will be available starting 5 p.m. Monday, Oct. 3, on a first come, first served basis, anywhere DNR licenses are sold, or online on the buy a license page. Both residents and nonresidents can purchase these permits but must first purchase a firearms or muzzleloader deer license. Permits purchased online will be mailed. Orders by telephone will not be accepted. In lottery deer areas, including permit area 260, firearm and muzzleloader license holders who intend to take an antlerless deer must possess an antlerless permit; otherwise, they are restricted to hunting bucks. The total bag limit for deer in lottery areas is one deer per year. To stay informed about the deer management and other important deer-related topics visit the deer page and to receive updates via email, consider subscribing to the Deer Notes email list by entering an email address at the bottom of the page. The DNR works to protect and maintain Minnesota’s white-tailed deer. The deer population, which varies in density from place to place and year to year, is dependent on adequate habitat and directly influenced by the severity of winter weather. Deer are ecologically, socially and economically important in a state where hunting and wildlife watching generate more than $1.3 billion in annual economic impacts. Discuss below - to view set the hook here.
    • Rick
      Pheasant hunting can put food on the table, supports grassland conservation and is a fun sport that doesn’t require a lot of specialized or expensive equipment. Once you’ve identified some areas you might hunt – the hunting usually takes place in grasslands or frozen wetlands – there are a few things to consider to make the most of time in the field once the Minnesota pheasant season opens on Saturday, Oct. 15. Here are some tips from the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. Regulations handbook and hunting license
      A small game license and pheasant stamp are required. Hunting regulations are covered in the 2016 Minnesota Hunting and Trapping Regulations Handbook. Licenses are available at the buy a license page  or in person at any DNR license vendor, and handbooks are also available there or online at the hunting regulations page. Hunting licenses are also available by phone, any time, by calling 888-665-4236. Don’t forget a $3 Walk-In Access validation, so you can hunt another 23,000-plus acres of private land. Maps
      Scouting an area will increase your odds of finding pheasants and good maps will help your efforts. Visit the wildlife management areas page for free online, interactive maps that identify wildlife management areas and Walk-In Access areas. Combined, these programs provide over 400,000 acres of public hunting land in Minnesota’s farmland zone. A local plat book may also come in handy to identify specific pieces of land. Shotgun and shells
      The best shotgun is one you are comfortable with. The style or gauge isn’t nearly as important as your ability to use it. Since pheasants are fairly tough birds, choose a load such as 4 or 5 shot and limit your shooting distances to 40 yards or less. This will result in fewer wounded birds. Nontoxic shot is required on federal land and many hunters prefer to use it any time they’re in the field. Blaze orange
      Minnesota pheasant hunters are required to wear at least one visible article of clothing above the waist that is blaze orange. This could be a hat, jacket or hunting vest. Consider that the more blaze orange you wear, the more visible you’ll be to other hunters. Good footwear  
      Pheasant hunting involves lots of walking on uneven terrain. Good quality, above-the-ankle shoes or boots will provide comfort and support for a day in the field. Since crossing creeks and marshy areas is common, many hunters prefer waterproof boots. Layered clothing
      Cool fall mornings often turn into sunny, warm afternoons. Layered clothing will prepare you for a variety of weather conditions. Long sleeves and gloves will help keep you from getting scratched up when moving through tall grass, cattails or woody cover. Hunting chaps or brush pants are an option to protect your legs and keep you dry on mornings when the grass is wet. Eye and ear protection
      Any time you use a firearm, protect your eyes and ears. Sunglasses and foam ear plugs provide basic protection. More expensive options include coated, colored, high impact lenses and digital hearing aids that enhance some sounds while protecting ears from loud noises. A good dog
      A dog is not required to hunt pheasants, but a good hunting dog will be a companion in the field and increase chances to harvest and recover birds. Be aware that owning a hunting dog is a year-round commitment of care and training. Be sure you’re willing to invest significant time and energy before taking on the responsibility of a dog. Refreshments
      Be sure to carry at least two bottles of water in the field and have jugs of water at your vehicle. Water your dog and yourself, often. Bring snacks to keep your energy level up and consider canine energy bars for your dog. Finally, grassland habitat is the key to supporting pheasant populations, and much work remains to improve pheasant habitat in Minnesota. The grasslands that support pheasants have multiple important benefits for people, other wildlife, pollinators, water quality and local economies. To learn more about pheasant hunting, as well as about what the DNR and partner organizations are doing to improve pheasant habitat, visit the pheasant page. Discuss below - to view set the hook here.