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BobT

Line color

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BobT    104
BobT

When you guys put new line on your fishing reels, how much importance to put on line color? Do you think color matters to the fish? Are there certain colors that seem to have an affect on your fishing success more than others? Is color more important to the fisherman than to the fish?

Bob

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Cliff Wagenbach    821
Cliff Wagenbach

Bob,

All good questions!

If you are trolling I do not believe that line color matters at all, except maybe right at your leader at times for certain fish.

I tie my walleye jigs directly to the green Power Pro line I spool all of my reels with during the summer. But I always add a Cajun Red leader to my lindy rigs.

In the winter I use a clear or florocarbon line thru the ice. I think that when the fish have plenty of time to sit and watch your bait they can be spooked a lot more by line colors and line that is too heavy.

Cliff

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LIGHTLINE    0
LIGHTLINE

PERSONALLY I LOOK AT LINE AS A VISUAL FOR MY EYES,NOT FOR THE FISH. THE DIAMETER OF THE LINE IS MORE IMPORTANT TO ME IN CATCHING THE FISH ,THE LIGHTER THE LINE THE BETTER THE ACTION ON THE BAITS,IF YOUR VERTICAL FISHING IN THE HIGH CURRENT YOU MIGHT THINK OF USING A LINE WEIGHT THAT SUITS THE CURRENT CONDITIONS TO BALENCE THE WEIGHT TO CURRENT.

SOMETHING TO THINK ABOUT

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Deitz Dittrich    4
Deitz Dittrich

I pay a lot of attension to it in clear water. In stained water I dont think it matters at all... I also feel that in heavy cover line visability has little to do with a fish bitting.

Ice fishing, I try and use the most inviable lightest test I can get away with.

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Ralph Wiggum    0
Ralph Wiggum

I think it's totally situation dependant. When fish are pounding a spinnerbait, buzzbait, or some other type of reaction bait, I don't think line color makes a lick of difference. When I'm live bait fishing or going with a finesse tactic like drop-shotting, I try to keep my line as incisible as possible. Then again, I guess most of my live bait fishing is done for cats and sturgeon, and I don't think they'd mind if I tied my rig on the anchor rope.

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DougSpringBay    0
DougSpringBay

Line color is huge!!!!!

I use Gamma Green mono for ALL mono applications. When bass fishing, you need to be a line watcher, and the green can be difficult. You just have to train your eye to see it. I think that is makes a difference. Topwater is not so important, but all under water conditions it is green for me. The only exception, is when I use Gamma Flourocarbon. Exceptionally clear water (i.e. LOW) requires it.

I always use a Gamma Flourocarbon leader when walleye fishing. Jig or Lindy, doesn't matter.

Muskie fishing--- Gamma Flourocarbon leaders---- Yes, it matters.

Just my opinion, I am sure there are lots of other comments to be made on the subject.

Doug

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LIGHTLINE    0
LIGHTLINE

MUSKIE,NORTHERN AND BASS WILL EAT ANY THING THATS IN FRONT OF THEM. THEY ARE OPPORTUNISTIC EATERS. I HAVE NEVER HAD ANY LINE COLOR ISSUES FOR ANY OF THESE SPICIES. IN FACT, THE MAJORITY OF THE OLD SCHOOL FISHERMAN WOULD USE A CABLE LEADER FOR ATTACK STRENGTH APPLICATIONS. NEED TO DISAGREE WITH YOU ON YOUR MONO ADVERTISEMENT THERE CHIEF.

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Northlander    72
Northlander

In darker waters or faster moving waters I dont think line color matters much. When Im jigging a river current I like high vis power pro in Yellow or the flame green trilene if I want mono. Fish arent getting much time to look things over so I dont think color is much of a factor in these situations.

Time of year is also a factor. In early spring when run off is happening and water is more turbid line color isnt as big a factor as lets say in late fall when lakes have turned over and visibility is much increased.

The faster a bait is moving the less line diameter or color is a factor of course. Trolling sticks and bottom bouncing spinners I dont worry much about color. Slow trolling Lindy rigs I use the lightest clearest line I can get. Usually at least a floro leader on the end of my Power Pro.

I know of a few "Pros" that use bright lines almost all the time. The thinking is that the line almost points out the bait to the fish.

If you have bad eyes or just want to be able to see your line better then I would use a bright line and just tie on a clear leader of your favorite line with a back to back uni knot or even a small barrel swivel when appropriate.

Winter when the water is as clear as it will be I always tie on a clear leader to my Power Pro when jigging anything. When using a bobber I use a clear mono and when dead sticking I use mono or a mono leader depending on fish Im targeting.

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Borch    318
Borch

Well I used to think that line color made a huge difference. However, I'm finding that although it at times can be a factor it's a lot less important than I once thought.

Personally I feel much like Northlander. With fast presentation color and line diameter do not usually make a significant difference(i.e. Pulling spinners or cranks). I do use flourocarbon on some of my spinner rigs due to their high abbrasion resistence. I do however feel that line diameter and flexibility has a lot of impact in those finesse presentations. Mostly due to how the bait responses more natural with lightweight presentations with the lighter lines. Lighter line allows livebait to do it's thing with less resistence from the line. It also allows very small light lures to fall and move more naturally.

I also know a few guys(maybe they're the same guys) using the low diameter high vis yellow ice lines for panfish in clear water and seeing positive difference in their catch rates over the clear lines. Maybe because it makes line watching for very subtle bites easier. Who knows for sure.

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backlash 1    0
backlash 1

If you have the oportunity to use an aqua view you will see just how visable most any line is to the human eye at least. I use 4 lb clear for panfish in the summer, and when you see it on the camara, it sticks out like a sore thumb!

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BobT    104
BobT

Most of my fishing involves walleye using the more finesse approaches like jigging and live bait rigging. Sounds like most would prefer to stay with darker more invisible or neutral colors for sure but it would appear that you would agree that line diameter also is an important consideration.

Would I be accurate to suggest that most of you prefer to err on the side of lighter, thinner line when choosing? I could also see that smaller diameter would be less visible as well.

Thanks for sharing.

Bob

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Deitz Dittrich    4
Deitz Dittrich

Yes usually smaller diam line is harder for the fish to see, it also will help in that lures will usually have better action on lighter line.

For me it really depends on what kind of fish I am fishing for, and how clear the water is. The presentation also has a lot to do with what pound test I am using too..

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DougSpringBay    0
DougSpringBay

I guess that is why it is so easy to win tourneys. Especially bass and muskie. They just eat anything you put in front of them. Sorry, line color does matter. Diameter matters greatly as well. I have just found that since switching to Gamma line, I can drop in line diameter, without giving up tensile strength. With walleye, color and diameter is everything. Need to disagree with you on that chief.

Doug

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Ralph Wiggum    0
Ralph Wiggum

Doug,

Just to stir the pot, I can remember reading an article in the past year (In-fisherman, I think) about some walleye pros that use high-vis green line on their rigs and they do just fine.

I'm not saying that you're wrong, just that there are several schools of thought and just because you catch fish one way doesn't necessarily mean that your way is the only way.

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DougSpringBay    0
DougSpringBay

Ralph,

If you will refer to the first post I made on this subject, you will see my closing remark. As I said before, this is just my opinion, and that I am sure there are many differnt ideas on the subject. That is what this forum is about. Guys who share what they do and are having success doing it. Never once did I state that mine was the only way. The post began asking opinions on line color. I just shared mine, and what works for me. I also included my comments on a relatively new fishing line, that I am 100% sold on. It is always nice when someone can offer advice/opinion on new products, or techiniques. I learn a lot from reading this forum. When someone really comments favoarably on a product, I will tend to really look into it. I am always wanting to learn.

Doug

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Ralph Wiggum    0
Ralph Wiggum

I'm not going to argue with you, but this post seemed quite derogatory to a previous poster. If I mistook the tone of your post, my fault.

Quote:

I guess that is why it is so easy to win tourneys. Especially bass and muskie. They just eat anything you put in front of them. Sorry, line color does matter. Diameter matters greatly as well. I have just found that since switching to Gamma line, I can drop in line diameter, without giving up tensile strength. With walleye, color and diameter is everything. Need to disagree with you on that chief.

Doug


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DougSpringBay    0
DougSpringBay

Ralph,

See his reply to my first post.

No intent to argue. I first posted, and have been slammed from the git go. Gamma is great line, try it if you like it. I believe in green mono and flourocarbon. Maybe it is just a confidence thing. However, nearly all of what I have learned has been from other fisherman, and personal experience. Though I believe in the green and flourocarbon, I got waxed in a tournament by a guy using BRIGHT YELLOW stren line. We were both throwing spinnerbaits on laydowns and in shallow flooded timeber in the fall. Though I got schooled that day, I have never tied on line that bright. My loss? Who knows. I say again, just giving my opinion and expressing what works for me. Maybe I should try bright Stren. I would certainly respect anyone who believes in it. I just ask the same courtesy.

Doug

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Northlander    72
Northlander

I also thought it was a sarcastic/derogatory post. Ending it with calling someone "Chief" sent me beyond you just giving your opinion to someone.

Reading a screen isnt a exact science though so I could be wrong. crazy.gif

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DougSpringBay    0
DougSpringBay

Northlander,

My reply using Chief, was simply to a direct response to a previous reply to my post using the same. As I said before. Courtesy should go both directions. My origional post had no intention but answer the origional posting, and to give review of what I think is a great product. Pretty common information on the forum.

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MT Net    0
MT Net

I have always wondered about line color. My thought is if fish can see line why do they get caught in gill and trap nets?

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DougSpringBay    0
DougSpringBay

I have always wondered how they can discriminate between real forage fish and a $5 crankbait, but can't a $20 crankbait, when they both have treble hooks on the bottom. I think a lot of this is confidence, but then again, maybe it all matters. Gives us a lot of options to spend money on. If newer and better wasn't an option, what would us fisherman do each year in order to have a Christmas list. Worse yet, there would be no other option than a new tie for fathers day.

Doug

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Bob/Mn    0
Bob/Mn

The line I use for Panfish is 4 pound gold stren or flame green fireline. I tip these lines with six foot of vantage using the blood knot. This system works well for me under low light conditions, fishing jigs with slack line.

I have a friend that uses gold stren 2 and 4 pound test tied directly to the jig. He catches as many fish as any one else.

I keep thinking that we give the fish credit for being a heck of a lot smarter than really they are. :-)

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upnorth    2
upnorth

I use 4# trilene clear or green. I believe the more invisible the line the better your odds, especially when the fish are being finicky. I have definetly caught more fish fishing side by side with someone fishing high vis line when the fish are finicky. If the bite is hot and heavy, I thinks the advantage is somewhat negated.

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Cbreeze    0
Cbreeze

I think I'm gonna chime in with my 2 cents here. I think the real answer was just given. "When the fish are hitting heavy, anything will work." I think there is a lot of truth in that statement...however, those instances are not the norm (at least for me) and why not put the odds in your favor ALL the time. Line diameter...lightest possible! Florocarbon...(especially leaders) for eye's! Power Pro 10/2...nothing better for sensitivity and being vertical in current (and casts pretty well too!). We don't always know when we hit a body of water how the fish are biting and, by putting things a little more in our favor, it can't hurt...right? Anyway, I also don't believe in most cases, that color really matters when throwing spinner baits...etc. For those applications I usually just throw green as it seem pretty neutral. Thought I'd say my piece. By the way, I will be trying the Gamma line next year! grin.gif

Cbreeze

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