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hoggs222

What size power inverter do I need?

17 posts in this topic

So I've got the generator to charge the batteries up. I'm going to be running a TV (More than likely a 15-19" lcd screen), Radio, Lights, Possibly a fan & a Playstation 2 (Using it as my DVD player). What wattage power inverter do I need for this? Also, what are some good brands? Places to get them?

Also, would it be good to install an onboard charger (made for a boat) to charge the batteries?

Thanks,

Hoggs

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To size the inverter you could start by looking at the ratings of all the devices you think may be running at the same time. Typically you can find these values on the back of the device or on it's power supply. Add up their respective wattages and that should tell you how much power will be needed. Multiply that number by approximately 1.2 to cover the losses in the inverter and it'll be a good place to start when looking for the right size. Divide that number by 12V and you'll know the current draw on your battery also so that you can calculate how long the battery(s) will last.

My inverter will shut down for 15 minutes after 60 minutes at full load to allow for the inverter to cool down. I've never loaded it to 100% so it hasn't happened to me yet....just what the instructions say.

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Do you happen to know what a 15-19" lcd tv draws? I haven't bought one yet, but I hear that they draw less than a tube tv.

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I looked at one the other day at Walmart and it said 55W on the back. I don't recall the size of screen....probably around that 19" size.

Doing a quick internet search I pulled up the specs of a 20" LCD TV and the manufacturer power ratings were listed at 75W.

When looking for a specific TV, go to their website and see if you can find a link to the detailed specs. They typically will list the power consumption which can give you a rough idea of what the product uses for power.

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The generator is 12V only?

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He mentioned using an onboard charger running off the generator to charge the batteries.

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The generator is 110 and 12V

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Keep in mind that a tv might draw many more watts when it starts up.

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Why wouldn't you just use

generator > AC powered devices

instead of

generator > batteries > inverter > AC powered devices?

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Noise, gas hassle.

I would get a 800watt inverter and maybe a smaller one for back up.

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It will be in a wheelhouse, so I will just mount this stuff in there and it'll stay there. I never leave it out on the lake for more than an hour with nobody in it. I don't want to be "That Guy" out there running his generator all day long. I'll run it for a few hours every few days to charge the batteries.

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The portable 800 watt inverters are still fairly affordable it does get expensive when you go to the permanent or RV versions.

I think my 800 was $69 on sale, the one thing I don't like about it is it shuts off before your battery drains down I think thats so you will still be able start your vehicle.

So I carry a smaller 400 Watt if I need all my juice it still runs my TV and Satellite Box no problem.

My lights and fans "computer fans work great" are DC so I don't need to convert them.

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Hmmm...

I was just thinking about it from a perspective of whether or not it's any more or less hassle (or convenience) to haul a generator to the batteries or haul the batteries to a charger.

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I use my truck to pull the house out. It wouldn't be a big deal. Set the generator outside on a rubber mat, plug into an onboard charger and charge.

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Quote:

Hmmm...

I was just thinking about it from a perspective of whether or not it's any more or less hassle (or convenience) to haul a generator to the batteries or haul the batteries to a charger.


I see what you meant now, generally 2 batterys will last the whole weekend.

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I would go with a 1000 watt. There not that much more.

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Is there any certain features I should look for? Low batter alarm, etc?

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