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jbtwins24

why coyotes??

7 posts in this topic

someone asked me this question the other day and i had no answer for him. why is it that just the dominate coyotes breed?? i checked with a vet and he had no answer for me. anybody have any clue?? thanks!

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I'm not trying to be Cliff Klavin here, but heres my take. The dominants fight their whole life to establish their supreme power and even during breeding season they constantly ward off other suitors to their pack females. My guess is over the years of traits picked up through breeding, that it finally has become part of the genetics and a dominant trait to pass on its strength and right to breed being the reigning Alpha male. Remember the saying only the strong survive. Just a theory. And probably didn't add anymore to what you already knew.

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Around here i dont think that just the dominant coyotes breed. They break up into pairs, as in late Febuary and March thats the only way you see them or find them. We hardly ever see packs here, mostly two's or singles. We have had 5 come in at one time but that was quite a while ago.

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IN theory only the dominant bucks breed and only the dominant Tom turkeys do the breeding. They don't fight off the lesser male sonly to let them mate the lesser females.

If a lesser male breeds a female it was luck or a result of overpopulation and there is no way a single male can mainting control on the whole group.

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Quote:

Around here i dont think that just the dominant coyotes breed. They break up into pairs, as in late Febuary and March thats the only way you see them or find them. We hardly ever see packs here, mostly two's or singles. We have had 5 come in at one time but that was quite a while ago.


Same as around here.We used to hunt 7 days a week all winter long.Come late Feb about once every 3-4 days we would see 3 one male/two females and the male was 38-40lbs.Otherwise you see lone males searching or a pair of them locked up.Seems like the smaller males in certain areas were able to breed at will

I think this was due to the fact the older males started to feel the pressure holed up during day light hours and the young males figured it was a great time to get lucky and not get kicked around

I'm amazed after a winter of good snow fall not 1 yote track can be found for miles.Come fall there just as thick as they were the year before

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How about some yote stories?

Here is two. Last year i had a yote sneak up on my bigfoots. My lab whined when she saw it, that made him come on a run. Must have thought there was competition. I Shot him at 35 yds. And, last weekend for the local pheasant season, my buddy's setter locked up so we ran over to it when my lab jumped into flush out the..not bird but yote. THe setter was only two feet away before the coyote ran out. We dumped it at 30 or so yards.

any other stories?

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Here is a story and a question. I was pheasant hunting in a refuge out in western MN. It is a refuge for waterfowl but deer and pheasant hunting is allowed. Anyway we were walking through a small grove and kicked out a yote. I was going to blast it but my buddy yelled not to, said we couldn't shoot them in the refuge. Can anyone verify that or is it probably a case by case basis.

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