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DRH1175

your favorite grouse gun?!

26 posts in this topic

I currently have a 1100 20ga that I use for Grouse. And although it gets the job done I was thinking of possibly upgrading. I was going to look at either another 20 or maybe even a 28ga. I feel you can't beat an o/u for grouse with the shorter barrel what is the ideal gun in your your opinion?

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Just bought one of Mossberg's new O/U's. It is a 28 ga., light and fast (and pretty)(and very reasonable!)... Went out for a twenty minute walk yesterday to check my deer camara... got my 1st bird with it... should'a had a double... dang tree! grin.gif

Look into it... I don't think you will be disappointed.

Good Luck!

Ken

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I use a 20 ga 1100LT and like having 5 shots at my disposal.

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Beretta 687 20 ga O/U.

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Remington model 870 Express Magnum 12 gauge pump

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I either use my Mossberg Model 500 20 Gauge or My Mossberg Model 500 12 Gauge. depeends on the conditions. I preffer using my 12 for early season to get threw the brush, but like the 20 better when the leaves start to fall

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Remington 870 Special Field, with improved cylinder choke. It has a straight English style stock and a very short barrel. Fairly light, and very quick to the shoulder. I'm not sure if they still make them or not.

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My brother owns a pawn shop and I have my eyes on that exact same gun. It's a 20 ga... I've never been a huge pump fan, but boy, that little gun is light and comes up quick with that English stock! Not that I need another gun... but as long as the MRS. doesn't find out, what's the foul? hehehe

Good Luck!

Ken

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12 gauge - I use a Fausti Stefano Field Grade.

20 gauge - I love this gun, Stoeger Uplander Side x Side.

I don't know if I've had a better grouse gun than the Stoeger. It's short, light, and great on flushed birds.

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28 ga Remmington 870LT - Very sweet swinging, light grouse weapon.

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I leave my pumps and autos at home, the only gun I use for grouse is my H&R Topper, 12 ga, cut back to 20" bbl and threaded for a screw in choke (mod). Loads fast, swings fast, easy to carry, can't get any better than that. One shot is all I get, but most of the time that is not a problem.

Later

River

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Remmington Youth Model twenty guage. Short, light, fast you look a little funny with it in your hands but it works great.

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When I am going to cover a lot of ground I use a 20ga H&R single shot. Nice and light. When the leaves are all down then I switch over to my Stevens /Savage side by side double 20ga. #6's in the full side and #8's in the modified side. A deadly combo that I have used for over 25 years. The old shotgun and my two labs make lots of memories..

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A few years back, my father inlaw had a little 20 sxs sitting in his closet. i asked about it and he said it neede firing pins but i could have it. New pins, Choked I/C in both barrels and I sold my 12 and never regretted it. Its a spanish made AYA with exposed hammers. Loaded with 71/2s has accounted for many many grouse

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GSPMAN and I have pretty similar taste...I love my 20 gauge Beretta Silver Piegeon II

ecb3f9d4.jpg

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Growing up I shot a single shot H&R 20 guage, great for long walks.

Today a shoot a Beretta Whitewing 20 guage o/u. Love it, light and can carry it all day.

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Nice pic Hubercita. The Beretta 20 is a good gun. I love mine.

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Besides being a Beretta fan, I'm also a gsp man

ecb3f241.jpg

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Huber you're good man. Those 2 boys look like they've got a few miles on them.

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Can you tell which dog I like to hunt with more? His eyebrows are gray, his seeds are bright red, and the birds are going to breath a collective sigh of relief when he retires.

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Browning Superposed RKLT 20Ga IC/M = Death.

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I use a Benelli 12 ga Montefeltro. 24 inch barrel with I/C choke. Same gun for pheasant but different choke.

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Guns I have used, started with a win. 97 with a 30 inch barrel with full choke. Next was a ithica 37 with 21 inch barrel and cylinder choke still use this sometimes first couple weeks of the season. Also have the benelli monti. the 686 onyx both wich take a backseat to a franchi 48al. The franchi is my favorite so far, all the above guns are in 12 guage. I did have an ithica 20 ga. ultra feather. couldn't hit crap with it. It was so light it had no swing at all. No longer have that gun. the franchi has a 25" barrel and swings quickly, also works nicely on pheasants. Also had a special field 12 guage, its a very nice gun a little heavier than the franchi. My brother now owns that one, I killed a lot of pheasants with it.

Wayne

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Don't laugh...mine is a beat up used Sarlimaz (made in Turkey). I know I never heard of it either but I'm cheap! It's an O/U 12 Ga with I.C. and Mod 26" barrels. So far I have only dropped one grouse with it, clays are a different story. It's so much shorter than my 870's it's a joy to carry around in the woods. The other thing I love is a thumb safety. No more walking around with my finger behind the trigger all day!

Ferny.

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I usually use my browning BPS 20 gauge. But sometimes when I know I am going to walk a long ways I use my over/under .410, just because it is so light.

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