Guests - If You want access to member only forums on FM. You will gain access only when you Sign-in or Sign-Up on Fishing Minnesota.

It's easy - LOOK UPPER right menu.

Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
DRH1175

your favorite grouse gun?!

26 posts in this topic

I currently have a 1100 20ga that I use for Grouse. And although it gets the job done I was thinking of possibly upgrading. I was going to look at either another 20 or maybe even a 28ga. I feel you can't beat an o/u for grouse with the shorter barrel what is the ideal gun in your your opinion?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just bought one of Mossberg's new O/U's. It is a 28 ga., light and fast (and pretty)(and very reasonable!)... Went out for a twenty minute walk yesterday to check my deer camara... got my 1st bird with it... should'a had a double... dang tree! grin.gif

Look into it... I don't think you will be disappointed.

Good Luck!

Ken

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use a 20 ga 1100LT and like having 5 shots at my disposal.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Beretta 687 20 ga O/U.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Remington model 870 Express Magnum 12 gauge pump

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I either use my Mossberg Model 500 20 Gauge or My Mossberg Model 500 12 Gauge. depeends on the conditions. I preffer using my 12 for early season to get threw the brush, but like the 20 better when the leaves start to fall

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Remington 870 Special Field, with improved cylinder choke. It has a straight English style stock and a very short barrel. Fairly light, and very quick to the shoulder. I'm not sure if they still make them or not.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My brother owns a pawn shop and I have my eyes on that exact same gun. It's a 20 ga... I've never been a huge pump fan, but boy, that little gun is light and comes up quick with that English stock! Not that I need another gun... but as long as the MRS. doesn't find out, what's the foul? hehehe

Good Luck!

Ken

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

12 gauge - I use a Fausti Stefano Field Grade.

20 gauge - I love this gun, Stoeger Uplander Side x Side.

I don't know if I've had a better grouse gun than the Stoeger. It's short, light, and great on flushed birds.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

28 ga Remmington 870LT - Very sweet swinging, light grouse weapon.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I leave my pumps and autos at home, the only gun I use for grouse is my H&R Topper, 12 ga, cut back to 20" bbl and threaded for a screw in choke (mod). Loads fast, swings fast, easy to carry, can't get any better than that. One shot is all I get, but most of the time that is not a problem.

Later

River

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Remmington Youth Model twenty guage. Short, light, fast you look a little funny with it in your hands but it works great.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I am going to cover a lot of ground I use a 20ga H&R single shot. Nice and light. When the leaves are all down then I switch over to my Stevens /Savage side by side double 20ga. #6's in the full side and #8's in the modified side. A deadly combo that I have used for over 25 years. The old shotgun and my two labs make lots of memories..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A few years back, my father inlaw had a little 20 sxs sitting in his closet. i asked about it and he said it neede firing pins but i could have it. New pins, Choked I/C in both barrels and I sold my 12 and never regretted it. Its a spanish made AYA with exposed hammers. Loaded with 71/2s has accounted for many many grouse

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

GSPMAN and I have pretty similar taste...I love my 20 gauge Beretta Silver Piegeon II

ecb3f9d4.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Growing up I shot a single shot H&R 20 guage, great for long walks.

Today a shoot a Beretta Whitewing 20 guage o/u. Love it, light and can carry it all day.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice pic Hubercita. The Beretta 20 is a good gun. I love mine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Besides being a Beretta fan, I'm also a gsp man

ecb3f241.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Huber you're good man. Those 2 boys look like they've got a few miles on them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can you tell which dog I like to hunt with more? His eyebrows are gray, his seeds are bright red, and the birds are going to breath a collective sigh of relief when he retires.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Browning Superposed RKLT 20Ga IC/M = Death.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use a Benelli 12 ga Montefeltro. 24 inch barrel with I/C choke. Same gun for pheasant but different choke.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Guns I have used, started with a win. 97 with a 30 inch barrel with full choke. Next was a ithica 37 with 21 inch barrel and cylinder choke still use this sometimes first couple weeks of the season. Also have the benelli monti. the 686 onyx both wich take a backseat to a franchi 48al. The franchi is my favorite so far, all the above guns are in 12 guage. I did have an ithica 20 ga. ultra feather. couldn't hit crap with it. It was so light it had no swing at all. No longer have that gun. the franchi has a 25" barrel and swings quickly, also works nicely on pheasants. Also had a special field 12 guage, its a very nice gun a little heavier than the franchi. My brother now owns that one, I killed a lot of pheasants with it.

Wayne

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't laugh...mine is a beat up used Sarlimaz (made in Turkey). I know I never heard of it either but I'm cheap! It's an O/U 12 Ga with I.C. and Mod 26" barrels. So far I have only dropped one grouse with it, clays are a different story. It's so much shorter than my 870's it's a joy to carry around in the woods. The other thing I love is a thumb safety. No more walking around with my finger behind the trigger all day!

Ferny.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I usually use my browning BPS 20 gauge. But sometimes when I know I am going to walk a long ways I use my over/under .410, just because it is so light.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Posts

    • HunterFisher11

      Posted

      Thanks for the info!!! Will be up there on 10/5-10/8, have been looking at the weather and I hope they are wrong because looks like rain... Have you ever tried fishing out on pike island area? Brother inlaw drove down there this summer and said there were quiet a few people fishing there.

    • Minnesota motorists can support conservation with a new critical habitat plate featuring a wild turkey.
      The new plate displays a colorful tom turkey and is the ninth critical habitat plate offered. Other plates display a moose, loon, pheasant, chickadee, showy lady’s slipper, a fishing scene and two with white-tailed deer. There is also a specialty license plate for state parks and trails.

      “Wild turkey restoration in Minnesota is one of our great conservation success stories,” said Kim Hennings, wildlife land acquisition coordinator. “The critical habitat plates are a great way for motorists to show their interest and support for Minnesota’s fish and wildlife resources.”

      Wild turkeys are native to southeastern Minnesota, but disappeared by 1880 because of habitat loss and unregulated hunting. Successful reintroduction efforts starting in the 1970s led to turkeys now living over a wide range of Minnesota.

      “The wild turkey critical habitat plate has been long awaited for by our membership in Minnesota and turkey hunting enthusiasts,” said Tom Glines, National Wild Turkey Federation regional director. “We love the wild turkey resource and want to do everything we can do to keep wild turkey populations healthy and thriving.”

      The Minnesota Legislature created the critical habitat license plate program in 1995 to provide additional opportunity for Minnesotans to contribute toward conservation. Motorists who purchase a critical habitat plate pay a $10 initial fee, plus a minimum annual contribution of $30 to the Reinvest in Minnesota (RIM) program. Every dollar generated through the sale of the license plate is matched with private donations of cash or land. The annual $30 contribution is not tax deductible.

      Critical habitat license plate revenue has generated more than $59 million to acquire or improve 22,000 acres of critical habitat and helped fund non-game wildlife research and surveys, habitat enhancement and educational programs. Information about the program and details about how to order plates are available on the DNR website at www.mndnr.gov/plates.

      The new license plates are now available at deputy registrar offices statewide. For questions about ordering critical habitat license plates, call the Department of Public Safety-Driver and Vehicle Services at 612-297-3166.

      Discuss below - to view set the hook here.

    • The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources recently honored two youths for their outstanding conservation efforts during a ceremony at the 2016 Minnesota State Fair.

      Eliza Sankovitz from Waseca in Waseca County received the 4-H award and Melissa Schilling from Frazee in Becker County received the Future Farmers of America (FFA) award.

      The DNR Commissioner’s Youth Awards are given annually to an FFA student and 4-H member who have demonstrated initiative, leadership, creativity and achievement in conservation and wise use of natural and agricultural resources. This is the 25th year of the award program.

      Curious about the quality of the water in Clear Lake, Eliza Sankovitz asked the question, “What pollutants might be entering the lake?” This was the beginning of Sankovitz’s 4-H project titled “How Clear is Clear Lake.” Sankovitz found three locations around Clear Lake and took water samples after rain events. She then tested the water samples for bacteria, nitrates, chlorine, lead and pesticides. Sankovitz said she did find some pollutants entering the lake.

      Sankovitz is the daughter of Tom and Gretchen Sankovitz.

      Schilling grew up on a farm in rural Becker County. As a member of her FFA Fish and Wildlife Management team, she placed as top individual multiple times at regional competitions. Schilling also placed first in her area and third at state in the Minnesota Senior Envirothon.

      As a member of the Youth Conservation Corps, Schilling worked at the Tamarac National Wildlife Refuge. While on the job, she assisted with prairie restoration, bird surveys, goose banding, invasive species control and refuge facility maintenance. Schilling is currently enrolled at the University of Minnesota Crookston, and is pursuing a degree in wildlife management.

      Schilling is the daughter of Charles and Regina Schilling.

      Discuss below - to view set the hook here.

    • BringAnExtension

      Posted

      11 hours ago, ZachD said:

      I am sure Johnny P is all booked up on weekends by now and for some reason some of the guys don't like sleeper houses all though I may push for it this year last year was such a hassle packing everything up for the night loading the trucks having to bring sleds and wheelers. I much rather bring my flasher couple rods and lots of beer. I go fishing enough running and gunning its nice to have a break where you just show up and fish.

      Yes, he probably is.  I book with him early.  I think that he offers guide service in December up until he opens the sleepers up.  Might align with your portables.

    • I was on Namakan yesterday and kept 4 eyes 14" to 15" caught in under 20' of water. Water temp is 60. I was rigging with a half crawler. However, I had friends out using jigs and minnows in 40+ ft and they did well. He said he found a school and using his I Pilot just hovered over the top of them. So it seems the fish are scattered and all methods are working.

      1 person likes this
    • monstermoose78

      Posted

      I hope this weekend is better than last!!  I know there is a  lot of ducks around but they have so many places to hide.

    • If you want to stay away from the crowd I would suggest Beacon Harbor I think after jan 1st they don't allow day passes its only beacon harbor and outdoor authority who have houses there. Then they allow only a limited amount of yearly passes.

      Now they don't have all the bells and whistles like a bar and food ect but John and Ann are some of the nicest people you will ever meet. Not to mention I personally think it is some of the best.

       

      Now if you needed a bar and food and all that my choices would be Rogers or Westwind

    • fins_n'_feathers

      Posted

      Today was the complete opposite of yesterday. The current coming out of light house gap made a pocket of clear water out in the lake overnight, fished right on the edge of the muddy water in 14 feet of water and went through 3 bags of frozen shiners and caught a bunch on plastics after the minnows were gone. Nothing fantastic for size, only 3 in the slot but nice limits of 14-17 inchers and a ton of smaller fish. Once that muddy water gets blown out or clears up the bite is going to be crazy good!

      1 person likes this
    • eyeguy 54

      Posted

      212 wondering the same thing maybe?? ;)   

       

    • Agronomist_at_IA

      Posted



  • Posts

    • HunterFisher11
      Thanks for the info!!! Will be up there on 10/5-10/8, have been looking at the weather and I hope they are wrong because looks like rain... Have you ever tried fishing out on pike island area? Brother inlaw drove down there this summer and said there were quiet a few people fishing there.
    • Rick
      Minnesota motorists can support conservation with a new critical habitat plate featuring a wild turkey.
      The new plate displays a colorful tom turkey and is the ninth critical habitat plate offered. Other plates display a moose, loon, pheasant, chickadee, showy lady’s slipper, a fishing scene and two with white-tailed deer. There is also a specialty license plate for state parks and trails. “Wild turkey restoration in Minnesota is one of our great conservation success stories,” said Kim Hennings, wildlife land acquisition coordinator. “The critical habitat plates are a great way for motorists to show their interest and support for Minnesota’s fish and wildlife resources.” Wild turkeys are native to southeastern Minnesota, but disappeared by 1880 because of habitat loss and unregulated hunting. Successful reintroduction efforts starting in the 1970s led to turkeys now living over a wide range of Minnesota. “The wild turkey critical habitat plate has been long awaited for by our membership in Minnesota and turkey hunting enthusiasts,” said Tom Glines, National Wild Turkey Federation regional director. “We love the wild turkey resource and want to do everything we can do to keep wild turkey populations healthy and thriving.” The Minnesota Legislature created the critical habitat license plate program in 1995 to provide additional opportunity for Minnesotans to contribute toward conservation. Motorists who purchase a critical habitat plate pay a $10 initial fee, plus a minimum annual contribution of $30 to the Reinvest in Minnesota (RIM) program. Every dollar generated through the sale of the license plate is matched with private donations of cash or land. The annual $30 contribution is not tax deductible. Critical habitat license plate revenue has generated more than $59 million to acquire or improve 22,000 acres of critical habitat and helped fund non-game wildlife research and surveys, habitat enhancement and educational programs. Information about the program and details about how to order plates are available on the DNR website at www.mndnr.gov/plates. The new license plates are now available at deputy registrar offices statewide. For questions about ordering critical habitat license plates, call the Department of Public Safety-Driver and Vehicle Services at 612-297-3166. Discuss below - to view set the hook here.
    • Rick
      The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources recently honored two youths for their outstanding conservation efforts during a ceremony at the 2016 Minnesota State Fair. Eliza Sankovitz from Waseca in Waseca County received the 4-H award and Melissa Schilling from Frazee in Becker County received the Future Farmers of America (FFA) award. The DNR Commissioner’s Youth Awards are given annually to an FFA student and 4-H member who have demonstrated initiative, leadership, creativity and achievement in conservation and wise use of natural and agricultural resources. This is the 25th year of the award program. Curious about the quality of the water in Clear Lake, Eliza Sankovitz asked the question, “What pollutants might be entering the lake?” This was the beginning of Sankovitz’s 4-H project titled “How Clear is Clear Lake.” Sankovitz found three locations around Clear Lake and took water samples after rain events. She then tested the water samples for bacteria, nitrates, chlorine, lead and pesticides. Sankovitz said she did find some pollutants entering the lake. Sankovitz is the daughter of Tom and Gretchen Sankovitz. Schilling grew up on a farm in rural Becker County. As a member of her FFA Fish and Wildlife Management team, she placed as top individual multiple times at regional competitions. Schilling also placed first in her area and third at state in the Minnesota Senior Envirothon. As a member of the Youth Conservation Corps, Schilling worked at the Tamarac National Wildlife Refuge. While on the job, she assisted with prairie restoration, bird surveys, goose banding, invasive species control and refuge facility maintenance. Schilling is currently enrolled at the University of Minnesota Crookston, and is pursuing a degree in wildlife management. Schilling is the daughter of Charles and Regina Schilling. Discuss below - to view set the hook here.
    • BringAnExtension
      Yes, he probably is.  I book with him early.  I think that he offers guide service in December up until he opens the sleepers up.  Might align with your portables.
    • Dusty
      I was on Namakan yesterday and kept 4 eyes 14" to 15" caught in under 20' of water. Water temp is 60. I was rigging with a half crawler. However, I had friends out using jigs and minnows in 40+ ft and they did well. He said he found a school and using his I Pilot just hovered over the top of them. So it seems the fish are scattered and all methods are working.