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USPENAMC

cattle dog, beagle, spaniel mix?

8 posts in this topic

this guy has some puppies and was wondering what you think of a mix of cattle dog, beagle and spaniel. i want to use it for hunting and its an affordable dog. I read all the dogs profiles and cattle dogs seem to be smart, obedient, loyal, and very energetic, beagles well are used for hunting hares in packs and spaniels well you know about them

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Personally I'd get a dog breed for hunting but if this is your only viable option then there's a few things to think about. Will it be big enough to hunt in cover. Will it be built properly so it can hunt for at least a few hours at a time. And last will it have some hunting prey drive in it. If you can answer yes to these questions then give it a try but keep your expectations low.

Good luck,

gspman

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What kind of hunting do you want to do with a dog? If you just want to chase rabbits, this dog may do. If you want to chase birds, look for something that has more retriever, setter, pointer bloodlines. If cost is a concern, check the local pounds, they usually have some labs/lab mixes. Keep watching the papers and bulletin boards, lots of dogs getting pasture bred and then free puppies are the result. Looks for a litter where the owner hunts, maybe his lab Maggie got bred by the neighbors Chesapeake.

My folks had a lab when I was in my teens, mom picked him out of a wheel barrow and paid $10 for him, I shot a lot of ducks and pheasants over him!!

Remember, a dog is 10-15 year committment. If you want something more than just a pet, get one thats bred for what you want to do with it.

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One of the best pheasant finders I've seen in recent years happens to be my farmer friend in SoDak's German Shepard! It won't pick up a bird, but will flush them and find the ones you knock down.

In my younger years I hunted over a terrier mix... she could find birds, but wouldn't retrieve. I've hunted over many mixes through my latter teens including Spring-adors, Chess-adors, Husk-adors, German Spring-ards, and German Lab-hair. They all did an admirable job helping us get birds... we had lots of time to expose them to hunting, while we had no idea how to train them, they listened (obedience) well and figured out what the game was in regards to finding birds (and rabbits and squirrels and mice and sparrows grin.gif)

I bought my 1st hunting dog when I was a senior (Shorthair) and my buddy bought a Lab. That is when I realized the lab was a good fit for me. Since then, I've tried to guide people to find a well bred dog of the breed they are interested in, not the 1st one down the pike. But I still know people who are more interested in a 'free' dog of mixed parents. I see no problem with it, but look to make sure there is some 'hunting breeds' in the mix to up your chances of getting a hunting companion out of the deal. I agree with the above posts as far as risk vs. return is in better balance buying from proven hunting stock, but buying a "breed" does not guarantee a hunter. One of my wifes clients has a 3 1/2 year old lab that is full-on dysplastic (to the point where they will probably put it down soon) and it does not have any desire to hunt... It was a 'cheap' dog... but in the end he would have been better off getting a mix for free or at least cheaper and giving that a run. Even if it didn't hunt, he wouldn't be having the issue of putting a pet down and running up the vet bills...

I'd say if the price is right and you are committed to working with this dog, you have a shot. As you posted the three portions of pheasant hunting are in it... obedience, nose and flushing. My buddy used to pheasant hunt over his friend's Basset hound in NoDak when they were young... they got birds! Who knows....

Good Luck!

Ken

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its SPANIEL, BEAGLE and cattle dog ill post a bit about each dog. im willing to try it as i see the cattle dog in them makes them hardworking dogs and obedient and the different mixes gives them great qualities but which one will come out on top is not known

i dont know how to post pics but if anyone can look at them and tell me what they think

Boots

Dipstick

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Like I said, you gotta chance with the 2 distinct hunting breeds in there. Let us know how he prgresses... post some pics as he's growing... I'd love to see which breed dominates the physical looks.

Good luck!

Ken

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if you give me your email i can send you a pic of what they look like now im still undecided on which one to get i think he is showing most of cattle dog breed

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First, do not PAY anything for this dog-it is a mutt. Will it grow up to be a lovable, fun companion?-sure. Will it be a useful hunting dog? possibly. If you are going to invest a dozen years of your life and several hundred dollars a year in food and vet bills why not wait and buy a hunting breed with a background. I really think you'll be better off. Rather than pay for this puppy, why not go to a humance society pound and check out the population of young dogs available. Maybe you'll find a nice young Lab or a bird dog of some sort. Try it. But please don't PAY anybody for the puppy you describe.

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