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chubei

The effects of your bow in winter condition hunting.

7 posts in this topic

I was wondering what problems, concerns, or effects have many of you bowhunters encounter while being out late season bowhunting. This mainly is an equipment based issue like your **bow** or stand, if any other equipment the more the merrier. For example, will the snow weather or temperature affect the bowstring and cables greatly. And if so, what do I do to keep the string and cables in good shape. Do i just keep on waxing it and keep it dry? My first year bowhunting and looking foward to the late season bowhunt. I hope my bow can stand the weather. I shoot a Martin Bengal XRG 50lbs. All information is welcomed and appreciated.

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You have a fine bow and I doubt you'll have any problems with it. But here are some other things to think about.

1. Yes, wax your string and keep everything in tip top shape. When you get to your stand pull it back once or twice. I find when it is really cold out that a bow will sometimes creak when first drawn back. I think this has to do with brining it inside and then outside and the temperature change. If you draw it once or twice if it is going to creak it will most likey do it then and not when you are drawing on a deer.

2. Practice with the same clothes you will be wearing. Face mask, jacket, gloves etc. I know my point of impact changes when I wear a mask so make sure to practice with the clothing you will be wearing in the field.

3. Cold weather can really hinder your physical ability to draw a bow. Cold stiff muscles do not work like warm limber ones. Make sure you are drawing a weight that is managable even in the cold. I used to shoot 70 pounds all the time but one cold winter day I could hardly draw my bow back on a deer. The muscles were too cold. Since then I've dropped my weight down to around 64-63 and shoot that weight all the time. It is much more managable for me especially in the cold.

4. make sure you do NOT get any wax on your cable slide. In cold weather even a little wax will bind up and cause chattering of the cable slide against the cable rod. My last bow had some wax get onto the slide that came from a bit of overwaxing on the string. Just be carefull as it's kind of a pain to remove.

I'm sure some other people will have more tips as this is all I can think of now.

Good luck.

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I think Gus gave you some great advice. One other thing I'd mention is that my experience tells me that my release is more likely to have problems than my bow in really cold weather. Twice I've had releases malfunction in really cold (-10 or colder) weather. One was a cheap release, but one was a high end release (well over $100 and a popular and respected name). I now keep my release in my pocket next to my body to keep it from getting too cold and frozen up.

Like Gus said, be sure to draw your bow when you get out. I also like to make absolutely sure nothing is around me, then draw it once every hour or so. Occasionally I get a little creek out of it that might have caused me some problems if a deer was nearby.

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Great replies so far!! I'll just add that treestand noise is also an issue in cold weather, not just stand squeking but also a killer can be snow from the bottom of your boots - try to get as much snow off them as you can before climbing up. For stands, I have a spray can of some type of lubricant - can't think of exactly what it is right now but I can check. Later.

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Gus nailed this one... The cold affects you much more than your gear. If I had a hint to add. I leave my bow outside once the temps start to get real cold. The temp change from inside to outside can cause frost or moisture to gather on your gear, which can cause it to do weird things(like creak and make strange nosies.)...

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One moring hunting lats season the day opened up-27 degrees late decemeber. it warmed up dramatically the first few hrs and a freezing rain, snow fell. good thing i drew my bow back to warm up a little. Ice bumps had formed all over my arrows and it wasnt a very smooth draw and im guessign the shot wouldn't have been the greatest. but gearwise.......i think the main thing is WATCH YOUR STEP!!!!!!! Trees like to ice up and climbing can be down right dangerous. If you have pegs in they will freeze in for a while too. Otherwise on the coldest of days and especially if theres any wind whatsoever its hard to beat a good pair of clear ski googles. THEY ARE WARM AND keep your face from freezing as much and prevents watering eyes when looking into the wind. You wont see many deer late season but they are big!!!!! shocked.gif

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I almost always leave my bow outside when it is real cold so there is as little temp change as possible.I have never really had any trouble doing this.The one thing I do when in my stand in very cold weather is to draw my bow back every 10 minutes and hold it there for awhile.I do have a problem with drawing it back after sitting there in the cold for a hour or two.Maybe one could also drop your poundage back some for a easier draw.If you do this then dont forget to check your sight.

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