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jbtwins24

what kind of bow you use??

47 posts in this topic

ive seen people talk about stuff for thier bows but now im just asking what kind of bows do you all use?? i have two bows a mathews and a parker. i use my mathews for bear and elk and my parker is for deer and turkeys. both of them are set at 75lbs. my friends make fun of me because i us my parker for deer instead of my mathews, the way i see it, my parker works just as good and thats good enough for me. happy and safe hunting!

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I shoot Hoyt Cam and 1/2. Personally, I don't think it matters whether you shoot one the new compounds, the old double wheel compounds, or traditional arhcery tackle as long as you can put that arrow where its supposed to be!

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Well said FBD...

I have a few hoyts...

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It is a Ford vs. Chevy question as we have said before. I drive Ford and shoot Mathews. I think Hoyt and Bowtech are also good. Chevy is not. wink.gif

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hitman is right. So, instead of getting either, I purchased a GMC Sierra: it is Professional Grade. What does that mean? Well, it means I am an (Contact Us Please) who paid $3000 more for a Chevy. frown.gif

I shoot a Browning Mantis, it's ten years old and I just got my first deer last Sunday.

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I shoot PSE and I really like my bow. Its nothing terribly fancy, but its easy to shoot and fits me...

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I shoot the Diamond Triumph, it shoots great. Just bought it this past spring so she's yet to kill a deer yet. Hopefully soon smile.gif.

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I shoot an old PSE that I've had for about 15 years.....it still takes a deer every year.....Now that doesn't mean I wouldn't love a new one....with all the choices and options out there...where to even start.

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I shoot the Mathews Switchback, and Chevy is better than Ford. cool.gif

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Mathews MQ1,shes getting old but still dropping deer if I aim right.

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I shoot a Parker Buckhunter and love it. Fairly new company (not really) but the owner/creator has been in the archery industry for many years and even worked for Fred Bear. Great article on the company in the latest issue of Petersen's Bowhunting.

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I have a Hoyt Trykon as my primary shooter this year. I also have my Hoyt Vtec that I have as a back up. Just in case. Both are set up almost identical (except for the limbs obvi) so if something happens to the Trykon, it's a natural transition. Always been a Hoyt guy, and as long as I am comfortable with them, I see no reason to change. I could probably shoot just about any bow comfortably, but not confidently. It's a mental thing for me.

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I shoot a Reflex Grizzly. Was offered a spot on the Hoyt Shooting Team by the local archery shop in 2008 so I guess I will be switching to a Hoyt. My husband has a Reflex Super Slam but got on the team for next year so he's ordering a new Hoyt in December. It's all just personal preference. As long as it puts meat on the table, maybe a set of antlers on the wall, and a HUGE smile on my face, it doesn't matter what kind of bow I shoot!

fishtrapgirl

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(Bowtech Defender). and I drive a 2001 Tacoma.

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PSE beast1 solo cam, not pretty but it shoots tacks is economical for a high school kid at the time i bought it four yrs ago in a package. Killed four deer so far wiht it and i love chevy drive ford.......it was cheaper grin.gifgrin.gifgrin.gif

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Mathews CQ3, I don't really care that happens to be what I bought. I shot a bunch of deer with my old Pearson too. It's the operator not the bow, I've screwed up shots with both of them... Although the Mathews, mostly just to the overall improvements in bows in general, is a lot better then the old one.

Sorry Ford's the way to go. I'm fine with any brand of car, although partial to Olds, but trucks I drive Fords. I don't baby them & I seldom wash them.

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wow its nice to see what people shoot. everybodys right a bow is a bow, it depends on the shooter. i dont know how this came into ford vs chevy. to me a car/truck is a car/truck. if it gets me from here to there its great. then again i do have the new ridgeline so i cant complain to much i guess.

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Golden Eagle bow. Kind of bummed because it will be my last one, Fred Bear archery bought them out and discontinued the Golden Eagle line frown.gif

Chevy truck, but I've also driven GMC's and Fords - any new truck is nice!!!!

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AR-34. Archery Research.

They still make Fords?

Chevy Man, that's what I am...

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BlackJack --

Just sold my Golden Eagle this year when I bought my Switchback.

GREAT bow -- I kinda miss it. frown.gif

The new one is awesome -- but it is like your first house with the wife -- have a lot of FUN memories. wink.gifgrin.gifcool.gif

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O.k well I'll be the first one, I shoot the Bear solo cam model and love it, its a big up grade for me, my old bow was the now don't laugh! Browning nomad 2

Oh and I drive a Ford

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How about a Hoyt Rebel? It's probably at least 10 years old. It was my father-in-law's. I haven't shot it yet. I'll get it checked out and set up for me and use it next year or the year after that.

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Gee, I was reading this post and thought that I was going to be the only one shooting a Bear. I had been shooting an OOOOOLLLLLLLDDDDDD Browning for years, and this year decided to get into something new. Decided I did not have a grand to dump into anything really fancy so off of a tip from a friend I went and shot the Fred Bear Code. I am very happy with the performance of it, and hoping to put the first deer with it on the ground this weekend! Only had one opportunity if that dang twig did not get in the way and skew the shot off to the right...

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Cool Chasingame, They do shoot nice for the price thats for sure. There not quitest thing in the woods but compared to the old nomad two its silent.

Just the way its built I'm thinking I might get 3 or 4 more years out of it.

For my field target I use plastic pop bottle tops, its funny to hear people brag about how well there $$$ bow shoots untill ya put somthing like that out at 40 yards it puts all bows on the same field IMO. Its all in the shot not the bow.

Brad

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Its great to have all the new spendy equipment to hunt with.Does it make you a better hunter? No,you can harvest deer with what you have as long as you practice.

I know a guy that has twice the stuff I do and I stick on average 3 a year and he gets one every two to thre years.

Go hunting with what you have and dont worry if your equip. isnt top of the line.You will kill deer and still have fun.

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