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      Members Only Fluid Forum View   08/08/2017

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loosegoose

Listening problem

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loosegoose

I have a one year old brittany that doesn't listen very well to come when he is running loose at home. When he is in the field he is a totally different dog and listens pretty well. Any ideas what I can do to cure this or will he get better with age?

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caseymcq

I am a big believer in electronic collars. That may be something you may want to invest in.

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Wild Willie

By this time your pup should know all the basic house commands like his name, come, heal, sit, stay, no bark and down. Remember he is still just a pup and you need to continue short obedience training sessions which include positive reinforcement and lots of praise. I have a 3 year old Britt and have come to learn this: the breed is soft handling, extremely intelligent, high energy, eager to please and enjoys repetition/routines (typical with most pointing breeds.)

I introduced my Britt to the e-collar when he was one year old. I was confident he knew and understood not only the obiedence commands mentioned earlier but my field commands of hup (change left to right direction), hup hup (reverse/turn around and head in the opposite direction), too far (stop and wait) and fetch. We had gone through six months of yard and field work utilizing only a check cord and some planted chukar.

The time had come and we were both ready...he understood what I wanted and what was required. I wanted nothing more than to be free of the dreaded check cord. It only took about three low stimulus corrections with the e-collar out in the field one day at a game farm for him to realize the importance of compliance with my commands.

I guess, in a nut shell, what I am trying to say is that sometimes a pups drive to hunt and chase can over power their ability to obey and comply with known commands.

You will notice a big change in your pups behavior after his first experience with the e-collar. But wait until you spend time properly training your pup, your pup understands the commands and use your common sense and apply the technology properly. You should never have to use the collar in your house and will probably only use the vibrate feature on the collar when you are in the field after your pups second full hunting season.

Hope this helps and please remember I am not a dog training professional...but I did stay at a Holiday Inn Express last night!

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korn_fish

How many other people deal with the dog at home compared to the number of people in the field? IMO the pup recognizes you as the dominate one while in the field, but doesn't see that or is confused as to the rules of the house. Very easy to happen when there are multiple people at the house. I had a similar issue with a lab a few years ago. I had to train my roomate, and then refresh the pup with the house rules. Within a couple days, all was fixed.

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gonefishin11

I live with 3 other college buddies and have a 10 month old lab. In the yard, she sometimes will not come or go inside when I want her to but will come and do everything just about perfect in the field during training and last weekend duck hunting (her first time and she was WAY better than expected).

The point being I am in the same situation you guys are but my roommates are also good at making her behave and they also hunt with me and I think that helps as well.

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findergameandfish

Let you're grass grow long at you're house then maybe he will feel like he is in the field and listen better?! otherwise i do'nt know. sorry.

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