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HansB

Three and a half inches of walleye

24 posts in this topic

Back when the slot regulations for Vermilion were being finalized a lot of guys whose opinion I respect were of the thought that the 4-fish, 17-26" slot was a good proposal. I tended to agree with them (mainly because most of them are more 'in tune' with the lake than me, and I respect their judgement).

Besides, the proposed regulations really wouldn't affect me very much since I've long limited my harvest to a few "eaters", always returning larger fish to the lake.

Now, after almost a full season with the regulations under my belt, I've come to a new opinion.

First, I absolutely support the concept of controlling the harvest to keep the population healthy. Therefore, I have no argument with the 4-fish limit. I think that's a fundmentally good rule.

It's the size slot that I think needs a long hard look. Here's why.

Most fishermen don't consider a walleye less than 13-inches as a keeper. We call them dinks, cobs, cigars, and other disparging names.

Also, given a 17-inch upper size limit, most fishermen won't keep anything over 16.5" because of the stories of fish "relaxing" in the livewell and gaining a half-inch or more in length and inadvertently becoming illegal.

Thus we are really fishing for fish in a narrow 3.5" window between 13-inches and 16.5-inches.

Now for guys like me fish the lake all summer long, and keep just a few eaters, that's really not a big deal.

But my eyes kinda got opened this past week. On two successive nights I was fishing an offshore hump on the west end. Just coincidently on both those nights I found myself in the company of a party of three boats (6 fisherman) on their annual Vermilion "boys week out" from Illinois.

Fishing was excellent --- the big mamas were chowing down to fatten up for winter! Between the seven of us on Monday and Tuesday evening combined we boated numerous (more than 40) walleye. Of those fish, exactly FIVE fish were legal. (Now I'm not saying this experience is typical, but neither do I think it's unusual.) I just think it provides a graphic illustration of the "three and a half inches" problem. Around 10-15% of our catch were legal to keep. The rest of the fish were in the range of 18" to 22" with one 25"-er.

Discounting me, those 6 guys from Illinois easily pumped $3,000-$4,000 into the local economy, plus bought 6 expensive non-resident licenses from our DNR. I don't think they're getting their moneys worth!

OK, so if I'm going to this length to complain, ya might ask if I have a better idea. Well, surprise, I DO have a better idea.

It goes like this. Keep the 4-walleye limit. And impose a "cumulative inches" limit also, of 64 inches.

Within that limit you could harvest any combination of 4 or less walleyes whose cumulative length did not exceed 64 inches, only one fish over 24" allowed. Here are some possible examples you could keep:

Four 16-inchers (total 64")

Three 13-inch dinks, and a 25-incher and (4 fish total 64")

A 30-inch trophy and two 17-inchers (3 fish total 64")

Now naturally mother nature isn't going to make the math always come out precisely 64" as shown in my examples, but given a limit of "four fish or 64-inches, whichever comes first" the typical fisherman would have a lot more flexibility in "what to keep", while still meeting the goal of a safe level of harvest to keep the population healthy.

Not being a fishery biologist, my suggestion may violate some fundamental principle of conservation, but it sure seems more attractive than fishing in a 3.5" window.

Whatta ya think, guys?

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Those 17" - 26" fish are the target of the slot because those are typically female and usually the prime breeding fish. The goal of the slot is to protect that breeding population and not allow any of that segment to be removed. Total length would still have the potential for a population crash if enough of those slot/breeding fish were removed.

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Quote:

Those 17" - 26" fish are the target of the slot because those are typically female and usually the prime breeding fish. The goal of the slot is to protect that breeding population and not allow any of that segment to be removed. Total length would still have the potential for a population crash if enough of those slot/breeding fish were removed.


That's one of the many explanations I've heard too, but never from the DNR.

In any case it is irrelevant to my proposal, because the proposal would not target any particular size, but rather spread the fishing pressure between the guy who wanted a couple of large fish, or several smaller fish.

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Hans,

I RESPECTFULLY have to disagree with you on this. I do mean respectfully, as you are a great "Vermilion Guy", and an excellent angler.

However, I think that your proposal is not realistic, in terms of enforcement. It would be self-governing at best, and having a CO measuring and adding up inches from a livewell, also considering the "culling" factor would be unrealistically unenforceable.

I understand the scenario which you present. However, I think the solution is different. Target smaller fish. We have not had any problem getting "eater" size fish here. I mean the "3.5" fish. They are out there in great numbers and are biting well. Your evenings on the hump is what I would call an outstanding time of fishing here on Vermilion, but not at all common. If that were the case day in and day out, then I could see the need to relax the limits. When it becomes a problem is when the bite is really slow and all you catch is one or two fish that are in the slot, over a few days. Though I do support the new regs, how about this as a possible solution:

4 Fish one over 17"

This would have given you 19 keepers in the two nights of fishing.

Just another idea.

Doug

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I'm not a biologist or anything along those lines, but I'd just like to offer what I've seen work very well.

We've fished the Canada side of Rainy Lake for nearly 25 years now. About 10 years or so ago, they enforced a slot where you could keep fish from 13.75" to 17.75" but all the others had to be released except for one may be over 27.5". They reduced the possession limit quite a bit, but it only took about 3 years and there was a walleye explosion that I had never seen before on that lake. There was such a great mix of age/size classes. It became easy (yes, easy!) to catch fish in the keeper range, plus have fun with fish over the 17.75" mark (many in the 24" - 26" range).

And, for the past 3-4 years now, we are seeing more of the bigger mamas show up, the 28" - 31" fish. I think the 4-fish limit is great. I'd even favor it on a state-wide basis. But, just from personal experience, I've seen how well the size limits worked for Rainy. Perhaps something similar would work for Vermilion??? They seem to be relatively similar lakes.

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I understand where Hans is coming from, ran into some guys up from Indy for a few days of fishing. Fishing was slow and they didn't know the lake that well. They shared their fustration simliar to Hans, however they agreed that there was some sort of regulation needed to maintain/enhance this great fishery. They felt the 4 fish limit was good, but felt that if one of the four that fell into the solt could be kept, that might ease some of the frustration.

The slot limit is only as good as it adhered to/enforced, as we well know some don't.

As of recent, I have seen several intances where a boat comes along side another boat and fish are handed off and the boat then takes of, make me kind of wonder?

MY 2 cents,

Backwoods cool.gif

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As I have stated in numerous previous post, I am not a big fan of the current walleye slot. I still think it needs to allow for one fish over 17 inches, instead of the 17-26 protected and one over 26. It allows for poorly played or gut hooked fish to be tossed back into the drink, no questions asked. I too want to see this great resource protected. If I didn't have a cabin on the lake, I would even be MORE against the current slot. I do feel sorry for those people who come up to this great lake, only to catch nice walleyes they can't keep.

I think that by making it a one over 17, you still protect most of the breeding aged females, but also allow for someone to keep a guthooked or mishandled fish. It also allows those who do not get to fish the lake often to keep an occasion bigger fish for a meal. Maybe a 13-17 slot, with one fish from 18-21? One 1-20 inch fish would make a good meal.

Hypothetical: would you rather someone keep one 18-21 inch walleye, or 3 at 13 inches? The amount of meat on the fish would be similar.

The only one over 17 rule would allow for everything we are all looking for. Protecting the breeding females from overharvest, allowing people to keep a larger fish for a meal(not everyone is as lucky as us and able to be on the lake most weekends) and makes it possible to keep an injured fish. I think it is pretty simple in my book.

For early/late season meat hunters-fish for smaller northerns in the shallow bays. A 2-4lb Northern provides plenty of meat and you cant tell the difference between it and walleye if it comes out of relatively cold water.

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Please, enough of the arm chair quarterbacking. This is worse than the morning after a bad Vikings game. Why does it seem so many of us think we are qualified fisheries biologists (even when we admit we are not)?

What's important is whether the Illinois boys think they are getting their moneys worth, not you. This sounds like your issue not theirs.

I sure hope that taking two less fish (or inches) home will not be the deciding factor in their decision to visit Vermilion again. If it is, maybe they should take the bucket mentality and go somewhere else.

I would like to think they are attracted by the overall Vermilion experience and spending time on great waters with good friends. Does that seem strange?

I just got back from 4 days of trout fishing in Montana with a good friend and our two sons. We caught a lot of fish, and didn't kill a one. In fact I haven't killed a fish in the 25 years I've fished in Montana. I go back most years, spend too much money, and throw all the fish back. I more than get my moneys worth.

If you're worried about all of us maybe it's time for us to forget the trips, sell the cabins, boats, and tackle and head to the super market. Walleye probably sells for around $10 a pound. We'd get a lot more fish flesh for the dollar if we'd fill up the bucket there.

Give it some time, enjoy your fishing, take some to eat, and let's give it a rest.

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Doug,

Likewise, you're one of the guys whose "opinion I respect".

Your message raises several good discussion points.

Quote:

Though I do support the new regs, how about this as a possible solution:

.

4 Fish one over 17"

.

This would have given you 19 keepers in the two nights of fishing.


That "four fish, one over 17 inches" suggestion is as good as mine (maybe even better, but I'll never admit that!).

Quote:

However, I think that your proposal is not realistic, in terms of enforcement. It would be self-governing at best, and having a CO measuring and adding up inches from a livewell, also considering the "culling" factor would be unrealistically unenforceable.


Realistically, "self-governing" is all the enforcement we have on Vermilion. In fact, I'll go out on a limb and say that Minnesota anglers, almost without exception, are a shining example of "self enforcement". Yes, there is always a remote possibility of having your livewell checked but even if we knew we'd never be checked very few of us would break (or even 'stretch') the rules.

I've fished Vermilion for 35 years, and since I retired 5 years ago, I fish it a LOT! In all those springs and summers and falls of fishing, my boat has been visited by a game warden exactly ONCE about 10 years ago. (And I'd bet that he visited my boat only because my tall blonde daughter in a swimsuit was fishing from the stern platform. Two guys from Iowa in another boat about 10 rods away on the same structure weren't checked at all.)

So I don't think we can point at "enforcement problems" as a reason for (or against) any particular harvest plan. Regardless of the plan, if the DNR checks you all the fish in your boat would get measured and the only actual burden of my plan would be the warden would need to be educated enough to add all the way up to 64. I think most of them already can add that high in their head, but I'd gladly carry a calculator in my tackle box to assist them.

Quote:

However, I think the solution is different. Target smaller fish. We have not had any problem getting "eater" size fish here.


That's, in my opinion, unrealistic for a couple of reasons.

1) Reason #1 --- only a tiny minority of anglers on any given lake know how to selectively "target smaller fish". (Certainly not 6 old coots from Illinois!)

2) Reason #2 --- Even if you CAN select what size fish you'll catch, everytime we go out (all of us) we have this secret dream on hooking up with that "lifetime fish" about 32 inches long. There's no way on Gods green earth we'll specifically tailor our fishing habits to avoid catching big ones!

Bottom line:

"Four fish or 64-inches, whichever comes first", or....

"Four fish, one over 17-inches".

I could live with either plan.

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Quote:

Please, enough of the arm chair quarterbacking. This is worse than the morning after a bad Vikings game. Why does it seem so many of us think we are qualified fisheries biologists (even when we admit we are not)?

What's important is whether the Illinois boys think they are getting their moneys worth, not you. This sounds like your issue not theirs.


Regnar,

I see merit in all the arguments presented here, except your attitude of "shut up Hans, and quit fishing if you don't agree with the DNR".

Please present some reasoned and civil arguments if you can. If you can't, have the courtesy to allow the rest of us our discussion. Thank you.

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Hans, I am going to go out on a limb and say that if the only reason they are fishing is to take home meat, they are fishing for the wrong reasons. I do take home fish to eat(I really like fresh fish), but it is nowhere close to the only reason I go fishing. I took my wifes brother in law out fishing on Big V a couple weeks ago and he never did catch a legal fish, but was sure smiling when he let those 21 to 23 inch fish go. grin.gif

I think as time goes on and the effects(hopefully positive) of the new regs come into play, we will see more of the eater size fish to take home.

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Quote:

Hans, I am going to go out on a limb and say that if the only reason they are fishing is to take home meat, they are fishing for the wrong reasons.


I agree with you 100%.

But where did I write "the only reason they (or I) go fishing is to take home meat"?

Go back and read my idea again ..... essentially it says:

--- continue the 4-fish limit.

--- if you want to harvest a bigger fish(es), then the limit (in numbers) might drop to 2 or 3 fish.

I'm only suggesting an alternate style of "slot" which still is far more restrictive than statewide 6-fish/no-slot regulation.

Look at it this way, then call my suggestion a "meat hunter" agenda (if you can).

The current 'statewide' cumulative 'length limit' is 144-inches (6 fish up to 24 inches) (or maybe 150 inches --- 5 24 inchers and a 30)

The current Vermilion cumulative 'length limit' is 68-inches (4 fish up to 17 inches) (or maybe 81 inches --- 3 17 inchers and a 30).

My suggested Vermilion cumulative 'length limit' is 64 inches and no more --- period.

In fact my suggestion is the MOST conservative of these three, but gives some flexiblilty over the current regulation by reducing the number of fish you keep if you elect to take larger fish.

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Hans,

No intent in telling you to shut up or to agree with the DNR. I'm just stating an opinion, like everyone does on this forum, including you.

Sorry, but I don't see the current slot discussions as "reasoned and civil arguments". I view them strictly as personal opinions of fisherman with no scientific basis to support them. The DNR might not be right, but at least there's some research to support their approach.

I appreciate your years of fishing experience, but as a scientist (I am a biologist) myself, I'm inclined to give the research based approach a chance. And I don't think four months is giving it a chance, the jury will be out for some time.

By the way, I'm no defender of the MN DNR and/or their policies (or lack of them). You certainly aren't required to agree with them, but sorry to say you've got less of a leg to stand than they do when it comes to managing fisheries.

I don't know if you read the rest of my post. The point I was trying to make is that some of us find "worth" in fishing for reasons other than filling the bucket. I eat my share of walleye, but I don't judge a successful day strictly by the number of fish I wack, sack, and pack on ice. And is it really about "getting your moneys worth"?

Personally, fishing this year has been just as enjoyable as last year. But maybe that's because I spend my time on and off of the water (until I responded to your post) thinking about things other than how the regs are impacting the inches of fish I kill.

That's it from me, to each his own, continue with the "discussion". Enjoy!

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Hans,

Don't worry about those boys getting their money's worth. A fishing license (resident or non resident)is not an investment vehicle measured by the numbers of fillets one expects he should be able to put in the freezer as a return!I'm sure those boys had a blast and (even if they could'nt find alot of slot eaters)they caught some nice fish to brag about didn't they?! I would much rather be able to fish (on a beautiful lake like Vermilion)_and catch fish I can't keep, than fish dead water(plenty of that in Illinois)and catch nada. The current regs were put in place to protect the future fishery by curtailing overharvest now. Chances are, if last years regs were still in place, a majority of those 40 plus released eyes probably would've ended up on a plate. Instead,they're still in there swimming and gettin bigger and sassier by the day...I like that!

Stizo

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Quote:

Please, enough of the arm chair quarterbacking. This is worse than the morning after a bad Vikings game. Why does it seem so many of us think we are qualified fisheries biologists (even when we admit we are not)?


Umm.... I have a degree in biology, all be it not fisheries biology but I did take ecology courses and aquatic biology... my wife is a fisheries biologist (her degree is in aquatic biology) and I consult with her often on fisheries issues. I hope something there would move me out of the ranks of arm-chair biologist grin.gif

And I am a fisherman who likes to eat fish every once in a while so I am disagreeing with you respectfully especially you "Vermillion Guys." Something that someday I will hopefully be considered one of myself.

I am all for that 17 - 26" protected slot. Even if only one over 17" in possession for a daily limit was permitted it is still allowing those fish to be removed from the population. Fishermen could go out and get one everytime they went and significantly reduce that segment of the population of walleyes.

I would really like to be able to dig up the research I read while I was at THE BEMIDJI STATE UNIVERSITY (a.k.a. BSU, this nations finest institute of higher learning grin.gif) that explained how slot limits were much more effective in sustaining populations than reduced bag limits were to be able to share it with the cadre here. But I haven't had any luck yet.

The unfortunate reality of gut hooked fish is just one of the downsides to this. Although, if fishermen would clip the line rather than rip on the hook that my curtail some of that.

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If I recall the argument in favor of slot limits, it goes sort of like this: The objective is to reduce the harvest to safe levels (I think the number is 64,000 lb for Vermilion that that is from memory) and it doesn't really matter the size distribution. The limit on recruitment probably isn't number of spawners. Reducing the numeric limit to limit harvest would require a limit of like 1 or 2 since it many folks only catch a couple anyway. A slot lets the limit be 4 without adding up to much total weight. The top lets folks keep a trophy if they choose to.

You will note that Milacs uses a variable slot to control harvest with no pretense of "protecting spawners".

The Canadians have the n walleye, 1 over 18 inches, as the system in Ontario, for what that is worth.

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Hans, Typically when there is a disagreement about the slot or the lower limit it is about what or how many fish someone can harvest from the lake. So one would have to assume that when there is grumbling about the slot or lower limits they are concerned about what or how much they can harvest from the lake. If that is not a concern there would be no concern over the slot or the lower limits. Don't really need to see it in writing that someone is concerned about what individuals can take from the lake in the way of numbers or size. I am not saying this as a slam, just a statement of how I (and probably others) interpret a grumbling about the slot or lower limit.

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Quote:

I am not saying this as a slam, just a statement of how I (and probably others) interpret a grumbling about the slot or lower limit.


I guess I need to take some remedial writing lessons down at the local elementary school, because this thread has certainly revealed a shortcoming in my ability to express myself!

I had no intent to "grumble" as some "would have to assume". I had no intent to start a fight (those who know me will agree that I'm a lover, not a fighter). I'm certainly not a "meat hunter" as several have alluded.

All I wanted to do was put forth for friendly discussion the notion of a different sort of way to regulate the harvest of walleye on Lake Vermilion.

Peace brothers, and have a nice rest of your life.

And, oh by the way, head on down to your local elementary school and take some remedial "assumption" lessons.

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I was born and raised in Illinois and I am an avid fisherman. Sadly enough, the fishing in this state is not much to speak of. Ever since I was 10 years old, my Dad started taking me up to the great northwoods for some good fishing. We fished Pelican Lake for about 15 years. As I grew older, I saw "meat hunters" destroy that lake. I can remeber catching 150-200 Bluegill a night, with a good majority of them over 10". As the years went by, so did the quality of fish. Now, I go to Vermilion every year. There are six of us. We have spent tens of thousands in gear, boats, etc. If fishing was all about "the bang for the buck", I would certainly be in a loosing situation. Someone mentioned earlier you can get walleye for $10 a pound. We come up for the relaxation and some nice fish. Every year we only keep enough to have one dinner together as a group, all the rest swim another day. I am now the Father of two small children of which I want to see them enjoy the same kind of fishing I did as a child. I guess all Im trying to say is that: You truly don't know what you have until its gone. Throw em back. If you want some walleye to eat, theres always the local supermarket.

wink.gif

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Good point HansB. After all, that is what this site is all about,..discusion.

I think it is clear that people fish walleyes for quite a few different reasons, but a primary reason is getting a meal of fish. The 3.5" range has put a definite crimp in that for many average fisherman (not the guides or the guided types), that represent the majority of people on the water. It has forced many of us to freeze fish here and there to get a meal.

While I support having regulations to protect the resource, I would be a lot more enthusiastic if the range was 19-28. By the way, just because a government agency makes a new regulation, it doesn't make it "right".

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This topic has been hashed over quite a bit since it was just a recommendation. Some are for some aren't... Just no way to please everyone. I am really not sure if it needed to have both a lower limit of 4 fish and a slot, but there are people studying what is being hatched and what is being taken out and I am sure their knowledge base is better than mine. I think in the long run it will be good for the lake, and if a few people choose not to fish for a while, then that is their choice.

I do think having the ability to keep one fish over the 17" mark would be a good thing cuz it makes me sick to my stomach thinking of throwing back a bleeding 18 inch or so walleye this going to be sea gull food in short order.

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I'm with Hans on this one.

I would actually prefer a two fish limit to any length restrictions. I don't get a lot of free time to fish up there (too busy fishing here grin.gif) but when I do, I sure would like to keep one or two for a meal. That's all I ask for 1 or 2.

It really doesn't matter what anyone else thinks about my opinion, it's the law that matters.

I think it good to have a healthy discussion about it nonetheless.

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Kudos to Gone Fishing..my outlook EXACTLY.I want my kids to experience the great fishing I have.Ive fished Vermilion since I was about 9 grin.gif..alot of changes...but all for the better..we use to keep the northerns and eat them...but havent ate a fish out of the lake since I was about 16..I still prefer Minnesota and Lake Verm....over any lake in wisconsin....havent tried Canada yet...and your right fishing Ill. is very sad

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Not a Vermilion vetran by any means, but will give you my input. I fish the lake 3 times a year. Mostly because it's a lake that I can catch eyes on. My 1st experience on the lake with a guide/now good friend, sold me. It is now a lake with a slot. Doesn't bother me one bit. I drive 300 miles because I know I will catch walleyes. I have a good time up there. I think alot of it is with the company you fish with. I would have a great time even if we didn't catch fish. My main reason for posting, is I want to enjoy this with my 2 sons in the future. The slot is a good plan for my kids to enjoy this with me. Hans, your original post was not intended for the insight that was received. You were simply suggesting other options. I respect your post and in ten years I hope to live there and be your fishing buddy! I'm jealous as heck that you are there and I'm not. Joe

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      The DNR regularly sells land which is no longer needed for its original conservation purpose, after a thorough internal review, and after giving state agencies and local governments opportunities to purchase the land. Proceeds from sales of lands the DNR had once acquired go to the DNR division that had managed the land and are used to purchase and develop lands better suited to that division’s conservation goals.

      Many of the parcels to be sold are School Trust lands. Proceeds from these auction sales are deposited to a fund that benefits the state’s public school system. School Trust land by law can only be sold at public auction.
      Bidders are advised to obtain and view the property data sheet, be familiar with the property, minimum bid price, and terms and conditions of sale prior to attending the auction.

      To obtain a property data sheet or terms and conditions of sale call 651-259-5432, or 888-646-6367 or email landsale@dnr.state.mn.us. The property data sheets are also available online at www.dnr.state.mn.us/lands_minerals/landsale/.

      Discuss below - to view set the hook here.

    • Minnesota’s absentee voting law makes it easy for hunters who plan to be in the field on Election Day to make their vote count on Tuesday, Nov. 8. Minnesota’s firearms deer season opens Saturday, Nov. 5.

      Minnesotans can request an absentee ballot to be mailed to them, or they can vote absentee in-person at their county or local elections office. Ballots must be returned on or before the Nov. 8 general election.

      Details about early voting are available on the Minnesota Secretary of State website at www.sos.state.mn.us/elections-voting/other-ways-to-vote, or by calling 877-600-8683, or
      651-215-1440 in Twin Cities area.

      Discuss below - to view set the hook here.

    • State forest trail use and management in northern St. Louis and Lake counties will be the topic of an open house, Wednesday, Oct. 19, 6-8 p.m., at Vermillion Community College, Room NS111, 1900 East Camp St., Ely.

      During the open house, Minnesota Department of Natural Resources staff will provide maps of existing trails, answer questions and take comments and suggestions from the public.

      Between 2003 and 2008, the DNR inventoried all routes and designated trails for various types of recreation within state forests.

      This current project will reevaluate the designations made during the initial review of the Bear Island, Burntside, Insula Lake, Lake Isabella, Lake Jeanette and Sturgeon River state forests in St. Louis and Lake counties.

      Changes could include redefining how trails can be used, determining options for motorized trail routes and trail connections, closing unsustainable trails, designating “areas with limitations” during hunting and trapping activities, and developing new hunter-walking trails. Changes to state forest trail designations must be made by commissioner’s order and published in the State Register.

      Written comments may be submitted to foresttrailplanning.dnr@state.mn.us or by mail to Joe Unger, DNR Parks and Trails, 500 Lafayette Road, St. Paul, MN 55155-4039. The DNR will accept written comments through Nov. 2.

      For more information, contact:

      • Joe Unger, OHV planner, Parks and Trails Division, 651-259-5279.
      • Joe Majerus, area supervisor, Parks and Trails Division, Tower Area Office, 218-300-7842.

      Information is also available online at www.dnr.state.mn.us/input/mgmtplans/ohv/designation/revisions.html.

      Discuss below - to view set the hook here.

    • Sartell artist Scot Storm won the 2017 Minnesota Pheasant Habitat Stamp contest. The painting was selected by judges from among 15 submissions for the annual contest sponsored by the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources.

      Storm’s painting will be featured on the 2017 pheasant habitat stamp. His artwork has been featured on the pheasant stamp in 2011, 2006 and 2000; and on the waterfowl stamp in 2015, 2009 and 2004.

      The pheasant stamp validation for hunting is $7.50 and is required for pheasant hunters ages 18 to 64. For an extra 75 cents, purchasers can receive the validation as well as the pictorial stamp in the mail. It also is sold as a collectible. Revenue from stamp sales is dedicated to pheasant management and habitat work.

      Four entries advanced as finalists and were selected Sept. 22 at DNR headquarters in St. Paul. Other finalists were Mark Thone, second place; Nicholas Markell, third place; and Mark Kness, fourth place.

      The DNR offers no prizes for the stamp contest winner, but the winning artist retains the right to reproduce the work. The 2017 pheasant stamp will be available for sale in March.

      Discuss below - to view set the hook here.

    • eyeguy 54

      Posted

      A dandy beast visited the yak this morning. 

      image.jpeg

      image.jpeg

    • NorthwoodKing

      Posted

      2011 Alumacraft 165cs, fully loaded, Musky rods/reels, spinning rods/reels, hundreds of musky lures, walleye cranks, tackle

      Abu Garcia Revo Toro 60 5.4:1 $175
      Shimano Calcutta 400TE $250
      Shimano Curado 300EJ $200
      Shimano Tekota 500LC $150
      Daiwa Lexa 300 HS-P $200

      St. Croix Mojo Musky 8' Med-Heavy Split grip $100
      St.Croix Premier 8'6" Heavy $125
      St.Croix Premier 8' Heavy - glass/graphite $125
      Thorne Bros. C Series Custom 8'6" Heavy $175
      Fenwick Elite Tech 7"6" Heavy - jerkbait/twitchbait $125


      St. Croix Avid 6'6" Med - spinning $75
      St. Croix Premier 6' Med -- spinning $75
      St. Croix Premier 7' Med -- spinning $75
      St. Croix Premier 6' Med lite Fast -- spinning $75
      St. Croix Premier glass/graphite Moderate -- trolling $75
      Fenwick Eagle 6'6" Med Fast -- spinning $75

      Pflueger President Spinning reel #6730 $60
      Pflueger President Spinning reel #6730 $60
      Pflueger President Spinning reels #6925 $70
      Daiwa Sealine SG17LC3B $75


      Bristol Village 102nd & Bush Lake Road Bloomington - Saturday October 1st 8 a.m. - 3 p.m.

      00w0w_bROm6jzb6Er_600x450.jpg

    • hoppe56307

      Posted

      I am JACKED UP, we leave for North Dakota tonight, scout all day tomorrow and blast:Bang: first thing saturday morning.  

    • HunterFisher11

      Posted

      Going to be coming up to nam and kab for last open water fishing for the year, just wondering if any one has been out and any luck?? And any pointers on where to try and presentation?? Thanks!! 



  • Posts

    • Rick
      Live to hunt another day by wearing a life jacket or float coat
      Hunters preparing to hit the water this fall in pursuit of ducks, geese and other wild game are reminded to include life jackets on their hunting gear checklist.
      “Hunters in Minnesota are trained from a young age to always put safety first. For duck and goose hunters, that means always wearing a life jacket on the water, no exceptions,” said Lt. Col. Greg Salo of the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources Enforcement Division. Each year, more waterfowl hunters die from drowning than from other types of hunting accidents. Swamping, capsizing and falling overboard are all common factors leading to these deaths, but in nearly all cases the hunter would have survived had they been wearing a life jacket. “Before launching the duck boat, make sure everyone on board is wearing a life jacket or float coat,” Salo said. “It’s the one item that greatly increases your odds of surviving a water emergency and living to hunt another day.” The wide variety of comfortable, camouflage life jackets designed specifically for waterfowl hunting includes inflatable vest and belt-pack styles, insulated flotation jackets, and foam-filled shooting vests with quilted shoulders and shell loops. “Typical foam-filled vests or float coats provide optimal insulation against cold air and the effects of hypothermia, but without question, the best life jacket for waterfowl hunting is the one you will actually wear,” said Lisa Dugan, DNR boating and water safety outreach coordinator. “Choosing a life jacket style that works for you, and wearing it every time you’re on the water, is not only a good choice – it could save your life.” At the very least, all boats must carry one U.S. Coast Guard-approved life jacket for each passenger, and boats longer than 16 feet must also have a throwable flotation device immediately available. Children under 10 must wear a life jacket. Other water safety tips for duck hunters include: Don’t overload the boat; take two trips if necessary. If wearing hip boots or waders, learn how to float with them on. Stay near shore and avoid crossing large expanses of open water, especially in bad weather. Share your trip plans with someone and advise them to call for help if you don’t return on schedule. Use a headlamp, spotlight or navigation lights to alert other boaters of presence in dark and/or foggy conditions. Carry a cell phone or personal locator beacon in case of emergency. Don’t drink and boat and don’t drink and hunt Visit mndnr.gov/boatingsafety to download the DNR’s “Water Safety for Duck Hunters” brochure and to learn more about boating safety for hunters. Discuss below - to view set the hook here.
    • Rick
      The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources is seeking applications for grants to support off-highway vehicle (OHV) trail projects and new trail proposals. Application forms for projects on existing trails are due to a Parks and Trails area supervisor’s office each year by Nov. 30. New trail proposals are accepted throughout the year. First authorized in 1984, Minnesota’s OHV trails assistance program is a cost-share program intended to help develop and maintain trails for use by all-terrain vehicles (ATVs), off-highway motorcycles (OHMs) and off-road vehicles (ORVs). Known as the OHV grant-in-aid (GIA) program, it helps to establish and maintain recreational trails at the initiative of clubs and other organizations, with the support and participation of local government sponsors. Organizations can apply for GIA funds through counties, cities or townships. All aspects of OHV trail development and maintenance are eligible for funding, including project administration, site planning, trail improvements, land acquisition for trail development, and trail maintenance. Proposals with a focus on maintaining or improving existing trails and trail systems will be assigned a higher priority. Program and application information is www.dnr.state.mn.us/grants/recreation/gia_ohv.html
      or by contacting the DNR Information Center at info.dnr@state.mn.us or 651-296-615, or 888-646-6367 between 8 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday.
                                                                                                     -30- Discuss below - to view set the hook here.
    • Rick
      The Department of Natural Resources will sell 40 northern Minnesota parcels in three public oral bid auctions in October and November. Tuesday, Oct. 25 – Nine northwestern Minnesota parcels will be auctioned at the County Administration Building in Bemidji. Thursday, Oct. 27 – 27 northeastern Minnesota parcels will be auctioned at the Lake County Courthouse in Two Harbors. Thursday, Nov. 3 – Four parcels in north-central Minnesota will be auctioned at DNR Brainerd area office. The properties include unimproved recreational land and residential lakeshore parcels in Aitkin, Cass, Clearwater, Cook, Crow Wing, Hubbard, Itasca, Lake, and St. Louis counties. There is a wide range of sizes and land uses in this selection of sales, from a small 0.80 acre former water access site on Pine Lake in Clearwater County to a 200-acre recreational parcel in Breitung Township in northeastern St. Louis County. The DNR regularly sells land which is no longer needed for its original conservation purpose, after a thorough internal review, and after giving state agencies and local governments opportunities to purchase the land. Proceeds from sales of lands the DNR had once acquired go to the DNR division that had managed the land and are used to purchase and develop lands better suited to that division’s conservation goals. Many of the parcels to be sold are School Trust lands. Proceeds from these auction sales are deposited to a fund that benefits the state’s public school system. School Trust land by law can only be sold at public auction.
      Bidders are advised to obtain and view the property data sheet, be familiar with the property, minimum bid price, and terms and conditions of sale prior to attending the auction. To obtain a property data sheet or terms and conditions of sale call 651-259-5432, or 888-646-6367 or email landsale@dnr.state.mn.us. The property data sheets are also available online at www.dnr.state.mn.us/lands_minerals/landsale/. Discuss below - to view set the hook here.
    • Rick
      Minnesota’s absentee voting law makes it easy for hunters who plan to be in the field on Election Day to make their vote count on Tuesday, Nov. 8. Minnesota’s firearms deer season opens Saturday, Nov. 5. Minnesotans can request an absentee ballot to be mailed to them, or they can vote absentee in-person at their county or local elections office. Ballots must be returned on or before the Nov. 8 general election. Details about early voting are available on the Minnesota Secretary of State website at www.sos.state.mn.us/elections-voting/other-ways-to-vote, or by calling 877-600-8683, or
      651-215-1440 in Twin Cities area. Discuss below - to view set the hook here.
    • Rick
      State forest trail use and management in northern St. Louis and Lake counties will be the topic of an open house, Wednesday, Oct. 19, 6-8 p.m., at Vermillion Community College, Room NS111, 1900 East Camp St., Ely. During the open house, Minnesota Department of Natural Resources staff will provide maps of existing trails, answer questions and take comments and suggestions from the public. Between 2003 and 2008, the DNR inventoried all routes and designated trails for various types of recreation within state forests. This current project will reevaluate the designations made during the initial review of the Bear Island, Burntside, Insula Lake, Lake Isabella, Lake Jeanette and Sturgeon River state forests in St. Louis and Lake counties. Changes could include redefining how trails can be used, determining options for motorized trail routes and trail connections, closing unsustainable trails, designating “areas with limitations” during hunting and trapping activities, and developing new hunter-walking trails. Changes to state forest trail designations must be made by commissioner’s order and published in the State Register. Written comments may be submitted to foresttrailplanning.dnr@state.mn.us or by mail to Joe Unger, DNR Parks and Trails, 500 Lafayette Road, St. Paul, MN 55155-4039. The DNR will accept written comments through Nov. 2. For more information, contact: Joe Unger, OHV planner, Parks and Trails Division, 651-259-5279. Joe Majerus, area supervisor, Parks and Trails Division, Tower Area Office, 218-300-7842. Information is also available online at www.dnr.state.mn.us/input/mgmtplans/ohv/designation/revisions.html. Discuss below - to view set the hook here.