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jltimm

Aluminum vs Carbon

14 posts in this topic

I wanted to know everyones opinion on this subject of what is the better arrow, aluminum or carbon? Have the newer carbon arrows improved through the years? Do they have the same amount of kinetic energy as aluminum for a complete pass through shot, even if it's not a perfect shot (say shoulder blade?)

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I believe these standard thoughts are close to right.

Alum are straighter before they are shot.

Carbon will fly flatter giving you more distance.

Alum may retain KE a bit better.

Carbon wont bend.

Carbon are a little faster.

My carbon arrows will do anything just as good as any alum I ever shot plus will do more.What I like is they fly flatter so using one pin is much easier.

I believe I have just as many pass throughs with both and a shoulder hit is hard to say.The only thing I dont care for in the carbons is the price.About the only time I dont have a arrow pass through is a spine shot or a longer range shoulder hit.

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I wrote an article on this subject that can be found at www.strictlybowhunting.com.

Here's my opinion:

Carbons are either straight or broken but Aluminums tend to be a bit straighter before they are shot. Aluminums are more prone to damage and, once damaged (bent or dinged) are not as strong. Your bow will produce the same initial (at the shot)KE whether you use a lighter carbon arrow or a heavier aluminum. A heavier arrow will decline in KE slower than a lighter arrow but that will be far down range, somewhere near 40 yards as an example. Carbons are more durable than aluminums and tend to last longer. They may cost a bit more at purchase but they last longer so the overall cost over time is probably about the same.

The most important thing for a pass-through is shot placement and a razor-sharp broadhead being shot on a straight flying arrow. Many traditional shooters get pass-throughs shooting arrows that have KE's in the mid to upper 30's. An average 60 lb. compound produces KE's in the upper 50's to mid-60's.

Any impact with heavy bone is going to slow down the arrow and may not result in a pass-through regardless of whether the arrow is carbon or aluminum. A heavier arrow will have a SLIGHT advantage over a lighter arrow but ONLY a slight advantage.

Opinion: Carbon's are worth the money and fly just as well from a bow which has been tuned to shoot them as aluminums shot from a bow tuned to shoot aluminums. There's too many variables involved with each non-perfect shot to say that either one will perform consistently better than the other in that situation.

Bow tuning is the number one thing to focus on, arrow material is up to the shooter's preference. Shoot Straight and enjoy the venison! (or turkey...or....)

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I shot aluminums for many years and then three years ago I tried carbons. At this point I won't be going back to aluminums any time soon, mainly for the reason that have already been mentioned - durability and flatter shooting. I probably have a couple dozen aluminums in different stages of bentness that I'd sell you cheap! I would think for a rookie, carbons would be the way to go. On my aluminums, I'd save 3-4 for hunting only, now on my carbons, I just take several that I've been shooting all summer and swap broadheads for field points.

I also like the flatter shooting since they're lighter. I have three pins on my bow set at 20, 30, and 40 yards. The last two pins are just for practicing and the 20 yard pin will be used for all my whitetail shots.

Carbons are the way to go in my opinion.

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carbons, they last alot longer than aluminums. they are alittle more expensive, but you save money at the end by how much more the carbons take then the aluminums. You can shoot at deer and small game and not worry about them bending after you get it back.

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Ditto to all said. I've broken both aluminums & carbons, but I've only ever bent aluminum. I switched 4-5 years ago & wouldn't even consider going back.

My friends that shoot them who don't post on here feel the same way.

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Thanks for the responses! What carbon arrow is a popular arrow for hunting? Best of both worlds if possible, price and quality?

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There are many good carbon shafts available on the market. I shot Beman skinnies first, didn't like the outserts, then I won a dozen Carbon Express 300's in a archery banquet raffle and that was the last time I used aluminum shafts with my compound. I've also shot Carbon Express Hunter 300's (bow: 70 lbs., 28" draw, drop-away rest, 100 gr. broadheads or field points), Cabela's Carbons. I prefer the Carbon Hunter 300's, I buy raw shafts, put in the inserts myself, adhesive-sticker cresting and 4" feather fletch and they fly great and take many shaft to shaft hits when target practicing and they remain straight. That's the main reason I shoot Carbons. Check out Jackson's Archery Page website for shaft selection charts. Carbon's have a greater range of "fits" to bows and you can tweak the spine by changing point-weights to fine tune them to your bow. Aluminums have more shaft sizes available because each size is sized more specifically for each bow-system and I've had it take several changes in shaft size to finally nail down the right one for a bow. I have a 100 or so aluminum shafts in a box in my basement which I haven't shot for years. I have few carbons but almost every one is still in shooting condition. So I guess I'd say "Get the carbons".

Best of Luck.

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I like my Beman Ics Hunters-very durable, you can get a dozen with vanes, cut to length, inserts and knocks for under $86- thats with shipping.

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I have Beman ICS Hunters and ICS Classics. I agree they are durable and resonably priced. I like them a lot. Has anyone shot Easton Axis arrows? They look like a quality arrow too.

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Beman Ventures is I believe what mine are called. I know the shop I go to said they sell a lot of them.

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I have Beman ICS hunters now,but have used Eastons for years.I believe they are both made by the same company now.

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The Beman ICS Hunters are good arrows for the price. I shoot the Carbon Express Maxima 350's. They're super straight, tough and fairly light weight, yet heavy enough to pack a punch. Carbon Express just came out with the Maxima hunters this year, a little heavier and designed to have a good FOC. These arrows are a bit pricy at around $60 for a half dozen but I've yet to ever break a shaft.

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I have been shooting aluminum for a few years, but today I went to Cabela's and got some Stalker Extreme carbon arrows with Blazer vanes. I'am gonna give them their first try tommorrow, and see how I like them?

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