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fishin5

Short Reed ??

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Ok I have called geese for about 15 years or so with a Big River Flute. I am successful with it, but My brother-in-law got a short reed last year and it sounds sooooo gooood! So I went and bought a heartland short reed AND CAN"T FIGURE IT OUT!

I know you're not supposed to "blow" a short reed, and I try to bring eveything from the gut, but it still ends up sounding like a party favor!! I know the call works because I have had several people blow it and it sounds great.

How would you teach a 5 year old (my mental age!)how to blow a short reed? What sounds do I try to make without the call?

Thanks

web

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have someone punch you in the gut while you are trying to blow the call

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Shawn Stahl puts out a good video for learning the short reed. I would get it if you're having trouble, I think you'll like it, I know I did.

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I would agree with Flick on getting a video on how to blow the short reed, it took me all winter to be able to blow mine, but it sounds so much better. Good Luck

A. Shae

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your not supposed to use the tip of your tounge you want it to stay close to your bottom teeth and cut off the notes with the far back of your tounge. Jeff Foils makes a really good dvd on how to blow a short reed

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I would second the Foiles. I have the Straight Meat Honker and his CD really helped me learn how to use it. When I first started I couldn't hardly make any sound with it, just sounded like a severly retarded goose but now it is sounding pretty good.

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Ha ha! Not to laugh, but I went through the same thing 2 years ago. I too went from a big river to a Heartland Flatliner II.

The difference between a short reed and a flute is unreal and the only way to learn is by getting a video. Then practice day and night. It takes a long time, but once you get used to it, you won't go back.

BTW- which Heartland did you buy?

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Same thing here, went from a flute to a short reed got very frusterated, took 2 short reeds back then ordered a high end custom and still couldn't get it. Got the Shawn Stalh video and started figuring it out in a couple days. It's totally different and Shawn does a great jod of showing you how. I now use the "G" sound in my call to make it work best, but it has to come from the back and bottom of your throat if that makes any sense. Good luck and get a video before you drive yourself crazy.

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I also made the transition from flute to short reed. I would personally pay more for the instructional DVD than the call itself. And don't be scared to buy a someone else's instructional video, as you can pick up different teaching methods and/or techniques. I guess the key for me was, staying patient and practice. Don't try to advance yourself if you haven't mastered step 1 first. It is so tempting, but you will happy with your results in the long run.

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Instructional videos are great but I'll take a stab at explaining how I blow my call (Tim Grounds Super Mag Pro).

#1 don't puff cheeks. You can get away with this on a Big River of other flute call

Pretend that you are trying to fog up a window with your breath by making the "Haaawww" sound. Now I would tranfer this feeling of blowing to the "Grrrr" shoud. You should actually be saying the word as you are blowing. Start soft and increase pressure until you get a sound. Hopefully this with be the low note of the two notes. Once you would get this you can work on keeping the note low but increasing the volume. Then by pinching off the air with your jaw moving up the note should break to the higher note. You've just done the base "cluck" that will build into every other sequence of call that you want to make. It definately takes practice.

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I started with a Foiles Meat Grinder (short flute). Starting with one didn't amke it easier to learn but I finally got the hang of it. When I started, most of my attempted clucks sounded like a strangled cat. I agree with the advice about a CD or DVD, particularly the Foiles CD. Hang in there and practice, it will come around.

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I bought a Tim Ground Super Poly Mag this summer and practiced a lot with it. Also listened to the instructional tape about 15 times and just kept working at it. I love this call and don't see myself blowing anything besides a short reed. Lookin at getting acrylic if I get good enough on this one, but it sounds awesome to say the least.

Instructional tapes, CDs, videos are very good ideas. Short reeds, so they say, are a lot like blowing duck calls and are supposed to be the easiest to learn the instant you figure out how to get the call to break.

Good Luck!

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