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IFallsRon

St. Cloud to have archery deer hunt

11 posts in this topic

Archers will hunt deer within the city limits of St. Cloud this fall, after a unanimous City Council decision Monday to allow the hunt.

City Council members voted to authorize a limited bow-and-arrow hunt in two spots in the city, to run from Sept. 16 until the end of the year.

A lottery will select 40 hunters who will be allowed to set up stands in Plum Creek Regional Park and near the Minnesota Correctional Facility — St. Cloud.

Hunters must pass a proficiency test and agree to the city’s restrictions, Health and Housing Director Dave Popken said.

The hunt should not upset normal city life, and no special markings warning of the hunt should be necessary, he said.

“Bow hunters are usually very quiet, stealthy people,” he said. “Most of us won’t even know they’re there.”

About 50 St. Cloud residents petitioned in September 2005 for action to control deer overpopulation in the city.

Residents complained of their property being damaged by deer. Munsinger and Clemens Gardens have recorded deer damage.

An aerial survey the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources conducted found areas of the city have a deer population of 57 to 85 deer per square mile, compared with five to 20 deer per square mile in rural parts of the state.

City Council members created a deer management policy this spring that allows for archery hunting in conjunction with the state’s big-game season.

The hunt is being kept small for the first year, but it could be opened up in the future, Popken said.

Applications can be obtained at City Hall or on the city’s Web site and are due Aug. 22, he said.

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The only problem with these special hunts is that you end up using one of your regular tags. If they were setup as a 'bonus tag', I think you'd see more participation.

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And I would suppose special restrictions means this must be an earn a buck hunt? Which isn't all bad, but just wondering? I heard about this over the past few months but haven't seen any more information about the hunt itself. I guess I'd have to do some work and actually call the city. grin.gif

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The St. Cloud Times had an article about the hunt in the paper. On the Internet they have a chat section for persons to comment on the paper. Unreal how many people are against this hunt. One person actually said "I live two blocks from the hunting area - I am scared I will get hit with an arrow"

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The Euforians who post on the comment section have no clue.

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I was in Red Wing when we started the City hunt there. People who don't know anything about hunting, or are against it, are just nuts and completely ridiculous in their statements. I remember one lady who had a daycare which was not really even close to the hunting area and she was going to sue the City for putting her kids at risk and threatening her business if we started an archery hunt. Its sad how clueless some people are!!!

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You can use bonus permits on the St. Cloud hunt.

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Yup, gotta watch out for dem der rickosheyon arrows!

They can go 5-6 miles fer sure and kill sumtin!

Hunter safety should be taught in schools when children are 12 years of age so they can see the real deal of hunting weapons! Not a misconception of some hoyty-toyty uninformed parent who thinks all weapons of hunting are terrorists in the woods! What a bunch of you know what! shocked.gif

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I put in my application for the st. cloud hunt. The tag is a bonus tag that is $10 which you buy from the st.cloud health department. The proficiency test is from an elevation of 5 feet or more from 20 yards you have to place 5 outa 6 arrows with broadheads in a 9 in circle. If you get chosen and pass the test an antlerless deer has to be taken before any antlered deer. The test is held on sept. 9th i believe and the apps have to be in by either the 22nd or the 25th.

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Ralltem'up you got it right the apps have to be in by the 22nd of this month and the drwing for the hunt is on the 25th. my app is in. also this is only my opinion, but 5 out of 6 arrows in a 9" circle at 20 yards. for a special hunt or not if a person cant hit a 9" circle at 20 yards five times, i think that the person should take the year off of hunting and practice more. I shoot6 almost everyday right getting ready for bear and i prefer ti get at leaset 5 out of six arrows in a 6" circle at 30. so again this is only my opinion so i hope i didn't tick anybody off!

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The $10 fee is an application fee charged by the city to administer the hunt. It is not a valid permit to take and tag a deer. You'll need either an antlerless tag from your all-season license or a bonus permit ($14) to take antlerless deer during the hunt. Good luck to all who participate.

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  • Posts

    • HunterFisher11

      Posted

      Thanks for the info!!! Will be up there on 10/5-10/8, have been looking at the weather and I hope they are wrong because looks like rain... Have you ever tried fishing out on pike island area? Brother inlaw drove down there this summer and said there were quiet a few people fishing there.

    • Minnesota motorists can support conservation with a new critical habitat plate featuring a wild turkey.
      The new plate displays a colorful tom turkey and is the ninth critical habitat plate offered. Other plates display a moose, loon, pheasant, chickadee, showy lady’s slipper, a fishing scene and two with white-tailed deer. There is also a specialty license plate for state parks and trails.

      “Wild turkey restoration in Minnesota is one of our great conservation success stories,” said Kim Hennings, wildlife land acquisition coordinator. “The critical habitat plates are a great way for motorists to show their interest and support for Minnesota’s fish and wildlife resources.”

      Wild turkeys are native to southeastern Minnesota, but disappeared by 1880 because of habitat loss and unregulated hunting. Successful reintroduction efforts starting in the 1970s led to turkeys now living over a wide range of Minnesota.

      “The wild turkey critical habitat plate has been long awaited for by our membership in Minnesota and turkey hunting enthusiasts,” said Tom Glines, National Wild Turkey Federation regional director. “We love the wild turkey resource and want to do everything we can do to keep wild turkey populations healthy and thriving.”

      The Minnesota Legislature created the critical habitat license plate program in 1995 to provide additional opportunity for Minnesotans to contribute toward conservation. Motorists who purchase a critical habitat plate pay a $10 initial fee, plus a minimum annual contribution of $30 to the Reinvest in Minnesota (RIM) program. Every dollar generated through the sale of the license plate is matched with private donations of cash or land. The annual $30 contribution is not tax deductible.

      Critical habitat license plate revenue has generated more than $59 million to acquire or improve 22,000 acres of critical habitat and helped fund non-game wildlife research and surveys, habitat enhancement and educational programs. Information about the program and details about how to order plates are available on the DNR website at www.mndnr.gov/plates.

      The new license plates are now available at deputy registrar offices statewide. For questions about ordering critical habitat license plates, call the Department of Public Safety-Driver and Vehicle Services at 612-297-3166.

      Discuss below - to view set the hook here.

    • The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources recently honored two youths for their outstanding conservation efforts during a ceremony at the 2016 Minnesota State Fair.

      Eliza Sankovitz from Waseca in Waseca County received the 4-H award and Melissa Schilling from Frazee in Becker County received the Future Farmers of America (FFA) award.

      The DNR Commissioner’s Youth Awards are given annually to an FFA student and 4-H member who have demonstrated initiative, leadership, creativity and achievement in conservation and wise use of natural and agricultural resources. This is the 25th year of the award program.

      Curious about the quality of the water in Clear Lake, Eliza Sankovitz asked the question, “What pollutants might be entering the lake?” This was the beginning of Sankovitz’s 4-H project titled “How Clear is Clear Lake.” Sankovitz found three locations around Clear Lake and took water samples after rain events. She then tested the water samples for bacteria, nitrates, chlorine, lead and pesticides. Sankovitz said she did find some pollutants entering the lake.

      Sankovitz is the daughter of Tom and Gretchen Sankovitz.

      Schilling grew up on a farm in rural Becker County. As a member of her FFA Fish and Wildlife Management team, she placed as top individual multiple times at regional competitions. Schilling also placed first in her area and third at state in the Minnesota Senior Envirothon.

      As a member of the Youth Conservation Corps, Schilling worked at the Tamarac National Wildlife Refuge. While on the job, she assisted with prairie restoration, bird surveys, goose banding, invasive species control and refuge facility maintenance. Schilling is currently enrolled at the University of Minnesota Crookston, and is pursuing a degree in wildlife management.

      Schilling is the daughter of Charles and Regina Schilling.

      Discuss below - to view set the hook here.

    • BringAnExtension

      Posted

      11 hours ago, ZachD said:

      I am sure Johnny P is all booked up on weekends by now and for some reason some of the guys don't like sleeper houses all though I may push for it this year last year was such a hassle packing everything up for the night loading the trucks having to bring sleds and wheelers. I much rather bring my flasher couple rods and lots of beer. I go fishing enough running and gunning its nice to have a break where you just show up and fish.

      Yes, he probably is.  I book with him early.  I think that he offers guide service in December up until he opens the sleepers up.  Might align with your portables.

    • I was on Namakan yesterday and kept 4 eyes 14" to 15" caught in under 20' of water. Water temp is 60. I was rigging with a half crawler. However, I had friends out using jigs and minnows in 40+ ft and they did well. He said he found a school and using his I Pilot just hovered over the top of them. So it seems the fish are scattered and all methods are working.

      1 person likes this
    • monstermoose78

      Posted

      I hope this weekend is better than last!!  I know there is a  lot of ducks around but they have so many places to hide.

    • If you want to stay away from the crowd I would suggest Beacon Harbor I think after jan 1st they don't allow day passes its only beacon harbor and outdoor authority who have houses there. Then they allow only a limited amount of yearly passes.

      Now they don't have all the bells and whistles like a bar and food ect but John and Ann are some of the nicest people you will ever meet. Not to mention I personally think it is some of the best.

       

      Now if you needed a bar and food and all that my choices would be Rogers or Westwind

    • fins_n'_feathers

      Posted

      Today was the complete opposite of yesterday. The current coming out of light house gap made a pocket of clear water out in the lake overnight, fished right on the edge of the muddy water in 14 feet of water and went through 3 bags of frozen shiners and caught a bunch on plastics after the minnows were gone. Nothing fantastic for size, only 3 in the slot but nice limits of 14-17 inchers and a ton of smaller fish. Once that muddy water gets blown out or clears up the bite is going to be crazy good!

      1 person likes this
    • eyeguy 54

      Posted

      212 wondering the same thing maybe?? ;)   

       

    • Agronomist_at_IA

      Posted



  • Posts

    • HunterFisher11
      Thanks for the info!!! Will be up there on 10/5-10/8, have been looking at the weather and I hope they are wrong because looks like rain... Have you ever tried fishing out on pike island area? Brother inlaw drove down there this summer and said there were quiet a few people fishing there.
    • Rick
      Minnesota motorists can support conservation with a new critical habitat plate featuring a wild turkey.
      The new plate displays a colorful tom turkey and is the ninth critical habitat plate offered. Other plates display a moose, loon, pheasant, chickadee, showy lady’s slipper, a fishing scene and two with white-tailed deer. There is also a specialty license plate for state parks and trails. “Wild turkey restoration in Minnesota is one of our great conservation success stories,” said Kim Hennings, wildlife land acquisition coordinator. “The critical habitat plates are a great way for motorists to show their interest and support for Minnesota’s fish and wildlife resources.” Wild turkeys are native to southeastern Minnesota, but disappeared by 1880 because of habitat loss and unregulated hunting. Successful reintroduction efforts starting in the 1970s led to turkeys now living over a wide range of Minnesota. “The wild turkey critical habitat plate has been long awaited for by our membership in Minnesota and turkey hunting enthusiasts,” said Tom Glines, National Wild Turkey Federation regional director. “We love the wild turkey resource and want to do everything we can do to keep wild turkey populations healthy and thriving.” The Minnesota Legislature created the critical habitat license plate program in 1995 to provide additional opportunity for Minnesotans to contribute toward conservation. Motorists who purchase a critical habitat plate pay a $10 initial fee, plus a minimum annual contribution of $30 to the Reinvest in Minnesota (RIM) program. Every dollar generated through the sale of the license plate is matched with private donations of cash or land. The annual $30 contribution is not tax deductible. Critical habitat license plate revenue has generated more than $59 million to acquire or improve 22,000 acres of critical habitat and helped fund non-game wildlife research and surveys, habitat enhancement and educational programs. Information about the program and details about how to order plates are available on the DNR website at www.mndnr.gov/plates. The new license plates are now available at deputy registrar offices statewide. For questions about ordering critical habitat license plates, call the Department of Public Safety-Driver and Vehicle Services at 612-297-3166. Discuss below - to view set the hook here.
    • Rick
      The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources recently honored two youths for their outstanding conservation efforts during a ceremony at the 2016 Minnesota State Fair. Eliza Sankovitz from Waseca in Waseca County received the 4-H award and Melissa Schilling from Frazee in Becker County received the Future Farmers of America (FFA) award. The DNR Commissioner’s Youth Awards are given annually to an FFA student and 4-H member who have demonstrated initiative, leadership, creativity and achievement in conservation and wise use of natural and agricultural resources. This is the 25th year of the award program. Curious about the quality of the water in Clear Lake, Eliza Sankovitz asked the question, “What pollutants might be entering the lake?” This was the beginning of Sankovitz’s 4-H project titled “How Clear is Clear Lake.” Sankovitz found three locations around Clear Lake and took water samples after rain events. She then tested the water samples for bacteria, nitrates, chlorine, lead and pesticides. Sankovitz said she did find some pollutants entering the lake. Sankovitz is the daughter of Tom and Gretchen Sankovitz. Schilling grew up on a farm in rural Becker County. As a member of her FFA Fish and Wildlife Management team, she placed as top individual multiple times at regional competitions. Schilling also placed first in her area and third at state in the Minnesota Senior Envirothon. As a member of the Youth Conservation Corps, Schilling worked at the Tamarac National Wildlife Refuge. While on the job, she assisted with prairie restoration, bird surveys, goose banding, invasive species control and refuge facility maintenance. Schilling is currently enrolled at the University of Minnesota Crookston, and is pursuing a degree in wildlife management. Schilling is the daughter of Charles and Regina Schilling. Discuss below - to view set the hook here.
    • BringAnExtension
      Yes, he probably is.  I book with him early.  I think that he offers guide service in December up until he opens the sleepers up.  Might align with your portables.
    • Dusty
      I was on Namakan yesterday and kept 4 eyes 14" to 15" caught in under 20' of water. Water temp is 60. I was rigging with a half crawler. However, I had friends out using jigs and minnows in 40+ ft and they did well. He said he found a school and using his I Pilot just hovered over the top of them. So it seems the fish are scattered and all methods are working.