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Tim Ellis

26" Walleye North of Sartell Dam

2 posts in this topic

i fish this section every couple days and this last week in our fishing league a gal netted a 26" walleye.

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    • mojoputter
      Know of a breeder that has a 3 yr old Vizsla that is giving him away. His grandfather was a champion but this one just didn't turn out to much of a hunter. He'll only listen to the boss and no one else. He's not gun shy but he is real sensitive apparently, whatever that means. He's neutered and up to date with his shots. Sounds like more of a family dog then a hunter.
    • magic_minnow
      Red for sure.  I usually do a Red/LOTW combo.  I also did Devils last season and the season before that and its tough.  Yes there are monster perch and big walleye but its such a big lake that's its hard to target them consistently.  You will run into a few fishing usual spots but then you have to deal with that prairie wind!  Gas line froze my first year there and the tow truck dude just laughed at me after realizing we were from MN and telling him that I didn't use HEET.  Advice if you go: Add the HEET to your gas.  -60F winds are no joke!  Learn from my mistakes  
    • Rick
      Public access closed during treatment

      The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources is partnering with the Greater Lake Sylvia Association on an aggressive new treatment method for the invasive algae starry stonewort in West Lake Sylvia in Wright County. This week’s treatment is the first time the diver-assisted suction harvest, or DASH, method has been used in Minnesota.   Earlier this month, DNR invasive species staff confirmed a half-acre of sparse to moderate growth of starry stonewort at the public access to West Lake Sylvia. The public access, which also provides access to adjoining East Lake Sylvia, will be closed for about a month during the treatment. An alternative public access site has been made available at Camp Chi-Rho, located on a peninsula directly east of the temporarily closed public access. The DNR is working with the Greater Lake Sylvia Association to provide signs and directions to the temporary access. The lake association is sharing in the cost of the effort to remove the half-acre of starry stonewort from the lake. Diver assisted suction harvest is a manual control method that combines hand pulling with machine suction to physically remove starry stonewort while sparing native vegetation, followed by application of a selective herbicide. “We’re hoping for effective treatment of the relatively small area where starry stonewort is present,” said Heidi Wolf, DNR invasive species unit supervisor. “While no treatment method has eradicated starry stonewort from any lake in the United States, this aggressive treatment will at least remove enough of the algae to minimize the risk of spread to other parts of the lake and to other lakes.” Starry stonewort are grass-like algae that may produce dense mats, which could interfere with use of the lake. The invasive algae also may choke out native plants. The algae is typically spread by lake users who transport fragments of the plant from an infested body of water. Lake users must follow Minnesota laws to prevent the spread of aquatic invasive species, whether or not a lake has invasive species: Clean aquatic plants and animals from watercraft. Drain all water by removing drain plugs and keep drain plugs out while transporting watercraft. Dispose of unwanted bait in the trash. Some invasive species are small and difficult to see at the access. To prevent their spread, take one or more of the following precautions before moving to another body  of water, especially after leaving infested waters: Spray with high-pressure water. Rinse with very hot water (120 degrees F for at least two minutes or 140 degrees F for at least 10 seconds). Dry for at least five days. More information about aquatic invasive species and how to report them is available on the aquatic invasive species page. Discuss below - to view set the hook here.
    • Rick
      The Department of Natural Resources and numerous partners have updated the Minnesota Wildlife Action Plan to better reflect conservation of the state’s native wildlife species in a changing climate.   “The plan addresses the primary causes of species population declines in Minnesota,” said the plan’s coordinator, Faith Balch. “Those causes include habitat loss and degradation, low reproduction and other biological issues, and the impacts of climate change. Along with the agencies and organizations that will implement the plan, we encourage anyone concerned about our state’s wildlife to review it and get involved.” The plan outlines three goals: Ensure that Minnesota’s wildlife remains healthy and viable, with a focus on Species in Greatest Conservation Need. About 16 percent of Minnesota’s known native wildlife species are identified as Species in Greatest Conservation Need because they are rare, declining or vulnerable to decline. Enhance opportunities for people to watch wildlife and participate in conservation. Acquire the resources necessary to successfully implement the plan. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service approved the revised Minnesota Wildlife Action Plan earlier this year.
      The 2005 plan goals were updated to better reflect wildlife conservation needs and approaches in a changing climate. The updated plan identifies 346 Species in Greatest Conservation Need, compared to 292 in the previous plan. Among the changes are the addition of the monarch butterfly and five native species of bees. The plan, a list of Species in Greatest Conservation Need, and related resources are available on the action plan page. In developing the plan, the DNR collaborated with more than 40 conservation partners representing a diverse group of agencies, organizations and individuals. Partners include the DNR’s divisions of Fish and Wildlife, Forestry, Parks and Trails, and Ecological and Water Resources, as well as representatives from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, University of Minnesota, Science Museum of Minnesota, Minnesota Zoo, The Nature Conservancy, The Minnesota Chapter of The Wildlife Society, and Audubon Minnesota. More than seventy agencies and organizations including Discuss below - to view set the hook here.
    • magic_minnow
      Any word on software updates?  Nothing since 2014.  Thanks in advance.