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tie flyer

Opening Fishing - Warmwater or Coldwater?

11 posts in this topic

With “opening season” fast approaching it occurs to me that I’ve marked three openers already this spring. That doesn’t include Wisconsin’s warmwater opener, since yesterday I was busy bringing trout to hand rather than toothy pike or walleye.

Over the last couple of years my opening weekend tradition has shifted to the relatively uncrowded trout streams. Prolific spring hatches and active fish are just too much to resist.

On the other hand, spring is a great time to strip flies through the shallows in your favorite warmwater lake. The fish are in shallow and you never know what you’ll catch…

Where is everybody fishing next weekend? I guess the question is: walleye or trout?

Wherever you fish please be courteous and follow the regulations. And have fun!

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I'm thinking I might do both smile.gif Starting with Troot.....unless my dad wants to hit the midnight madness on Mille Lacs. Then technically it's walleyes.

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I'm thinking cold water. When I've been out stream fishing so far this year, it's been difficult to get away from crowds. I'm hoping the warm water opener will draw some people away from the streams. I miss the solitude.

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I get a chuckle out of all the hoopla about "the opener" (Said hoopla includes the counter at the top of this page) because the season opened for me in mid-January. Some of the nicest hatches and most consistent action of the year for trout fishing occur before what the mass media insist on calling "the walleye opener" rolls around. I always wonder, by the way, whether anyone ever deliberately fishes, by any means, for northern pike, considering that the 'eye gets around 98% of the publicity.

Anyway, thank heavens for the walleye and the warmwater opener - both ease the pressure on the trout resource.

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I agree. I love the warmwater opener. From here on out that means the streams will be less crowded (save weekends and holidays). There's no doubt that the first month after the harvest opener arrives that trout fishing is a way for many to alleviate cabin fever. Keep publicizing the 'eyes tongue.gif.

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It's great to have been fishing for trout since January! I too like the 'eye opener as there seems to be more room on the streams from then on out.

I am looking forward to the May 28th opener of the bass season, but it'll probably be July or August before I hit the Root and Zumbro for smallies.

Good luck to anyone heading out for the big walleye opener this weekend!

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I don't fight the madness of walleye opener anymore. I will definitely choose to hit the Wisconsin trout streams if I get out fishing. Fly Tyer - I was just up on the N. Shore this past weekend after the rain, and some fresh steelies were back in the lower rivers. On the other hand, you could pull the fly rod out for warm water. Yesterday I landed my first two catfish using the fly rod.

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With no trout nearby, it would be warm water. Instead I'll be driving to Wichita for my sister's graduation from grad school. But that's ok, not big on the hoopla of opener myself, too many crazies on the lakes. I agree with WxGuy on the bass opener though, that may be one I have to make. The pannies have definitely been cooperating, but I'm ready for some bass. I got into tying this winter and have some hair poppers I want to get wet (and hopefully chewed up).

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Catfish? Nice work! They must have put up a fight.

Yeah, I am so torn right now as to the fishing opportunities. My sights are set on coldwater, as with many fellow fly rodders here, but the rich karst region calls my name only slightly louder than our rocket-propelled steelhead. This weekend I am off to an annual trip to the driftless country.

I hit the steelhead hard for a week and then ran out of steam. The honey-do is losing its sweetness and I am losing sleep trying to figure out how to hit both steelies and dry fly opportunities.

Sunday was pretty good. We went out on the Mother’s Day fishing trip (also a tradition of sorts) and caught a few chunky trout, mixed brown and rainbow. The river supports a steelhead run so that possibility excited me on every deep bend.

Do any of you have troubles convincing others that you have to go fishing now, right now? Even though the season is long, this is like deer hunting and now is the time.

Oh, the madness…

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tie flyer,

What part of the state were you fishing on Mom's day? Up by Alex or?

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I was fishing near Duluth.

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