Guests - If You want access to member only forums on FM. You will gain access only when you Sign-in or Sign-Up on Fishing Minnesota.

It's easy - LOOK UPPER right menu.

  • Announcements

    • Rick

      Members Only Fluid Forum View   08/08/2017

      Fluid forum view allows members only to get right to the meat of this community; the topics. You can toggle between your preferred forum view just below to the left on the main forum entrance. You will see three icons. Try them out and see what you prefer.   Fluid view allows you, if you are a signed up member, to see the newest topic posts in either all forums (select none or all) or in just your favorite forums (select the ones you want to see when you come to Fishing Minnesota). It keeps and in real time with respect to Topic posts and lets YOU SELECT YOUR FAVORITE FORUMS. It can make things fun and easy. This is especially true for less experienced visitors raised on social media. If you, as a members want more specific topics, you can even select a single forum to view. Let us take a look at fluid view in action. We will then break it down and explain how it works in more detail.   The video shows the topic list and the forum filter box. As you can see, it is easy to change the topic list by changing the selected forums. This view replaces the traditional list of categories and forums.   Of course, members only can change the view to better suit your way of browsing.   You will notice a “grid” option. We have moved the grid forum theme setting into the main forum settings. This makes it an option for members only to choose. This screenshot also shows the removal of the forum breadcrumb in fluid view mode. Fluid view remembers your last forum selection so you don’t lose your place when you go back to the listing. The benefit of this feature is easy to see. It removes a potential barrier of entry for members only. It puts the spotlight on topics themselves, and not the hierarchical forum structure. You as a member will enjoy viewing many forums at once and switching between them without leaving the page. We hope that fluid view, the new functionality is an asset that you enjoy .
Sign in to follow this  
J Boo

Which rifle?

Recommended Posts

J Boo

I am looking to buy a new rifle. I will use it mostly for deer hunting in Minnesota, but I would like to go out west and try elk sometime. I am looking at Browning's A-Bolt .270 WSM and 7mm WSM. Would these be good choices and is one better than the other?
Thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Gissert

This kind of question is always a lighning rod, lol.

The best rifle is one that you can shoot comfortably, and with confidance. See if you can shoot some friends rifles to gauge what your tolerance for recoil is. A big bore cannon is not much good if you dread pulling the trigger.

The new WSM calibers sure seem like the hot ticket. I have never cared for long actions, and the Ultra Mag craze just did not get me excited. These new shortys have my attention.

The guns you listed will certainly kill elk. Just use well constructed bullets such as the Nosler Partition or Barnes X bullets.

My current favorite is my Savage 111 in 338 Win. mag. Recoil is stiff, but not punishing. It is a no frills rifle, but is the most accurate gun I own, except for my 220 swift.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
CodyDawg

Good advice. As un-sexy as a .30-06 is, it still gets the job done just fine, plus there is a plethora of bullets available for it. The flinching issue should not be overlooked, you are better off with a .270 without flinching than a cannon if you flinch.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
J Boo

Does the 7mm WSM have a lot more kick than the .270 WSM or are they about the same? I have never shot a rifle so I don't know exactly what to expect. I am not to worried about a little kick but I don't want a gun that will make me flinch every time I pull the trigger.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Gissert

I have not shot a WSM in any caliber, so I cannot personally vouch for recoil levels.

That said, a short fat cartridge case such as a WSM is more efficient with its powder than a longer skinny case such as the ultra mags. A short action is less likely to be short stroked in the excitement of shooting at game than the longer actions.

270 and 7mm are close enough in bullet diameter to where the choice to me would come down to how the ballistics looked on paper. Consider the available bullet weights and down range energy into your decision.

Don't eliminate the 300 WSM if recoil is not a problem for you. For big tough critters such as elk, the extra power and bullet weight is nice to have, as long as you are comfortable with the rifle.

While I am not a fan of semi autos, I think Browning may be chambering the WSMs in the BAR now. The semi autos do not generate as much felt recoil and a bolt gun of the same weight. I shot semi autos for years, but grew to not care for the triggers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
J Boo

Thanks for the advice.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
benelli_dude2002

I shoot a 300 WSM myself. I just got it last fall just in time for the MN deer season and I had it broke in on opening morning. I did a lot a reading up on this particular caliber before I made the purchase. I too hope to one day try my luck for elk out west. I hunt mainly moose and whitetail in Canada because the season is longer and not as many people. I do hunt here in MN too. I got the stainless A-bolt and I'm a bigger guy so recoil don't bother me much. You might want to go with a BOSS for reduced recoil but you do gain some sound. I hunted with a ported 7mm rem mag a few times and I didnt care to have my ears ringing after a few shots. But as far as recoil it real makes a big difference. I also looked at the 270 WSM and 7mm WSM but I already got a 270 Win. and just sold a 7mm Rem. Mag so I went with the 300 WSM and so far I love it. I get good groups off the bench with factory loads. I went back to where I shot that deer last fall and ranged with a laser range finder and it read 435 yards. My longest shot yet to date. But there is so many calibers to choose from now and every year it seems like they are coming out with new ones it might get confusing. BUt as far as short mags go I think either one of the three is a good choice. Hope this helps. Brian

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
simplefish

I've shot the .270 wsm, and the .30 wsm. From what I can tell they both have just about the same trajectory, with the .30 having a lot more kick. Though I could be wrong. I have an uncle in Montana and he uses/and has taken both deer and elk with a .270. The .270 wsm packs more kick than a standard .270 but it gains more range, and knockdown power, because the powder burns more efficiantly. The .270 will work just fine for elk, and it won't shred all the meat in a deer. I haven't shot the 7mm wsm but I think that pretty much the only differance is range, they have pretty much the same bullet. If you will mostly be hunting out here in MN than go with the .270 wsm, I'm really impressed with it. It will work for farther ranges but not as far as the 7mm wsm. Just make sure you use a good quallity bullet like the fail safe, partition, silver tip, or x-bullet in whatever you choose. And You get what you pay for in scopes. It's better to spend a lower amount of $$$ on a gun and more on a scope. A few good ones arethe Leupold Vari-x 3 which I believe is 2.5x-8x (which I used last year, it's light, short and you can see the whole world through it), and I have heard that the Swarovski 3x-9x AV is pretty decent. Don't buy a scope with too much power, 3x-9x is pretty much all you need unless you plan on doing varmit hunts with your gun. Hope this helps.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Fisher Dave

Dont forget the good old 308.

The recoil isnt that bad and will drop an Elk without a problem. I shot competitively for years and used a 308 for several years on KD ranges (up to 600 yards).

A 308 is not my favorite calibur, but they are very distance friendly.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jwilli7122

if you have never shot a rifle before- my suggestion is that you go with a .30-06 or .308. The .30-06 is the most popular centerfire caliber of alltime for a reason. (and the .308 is basically a short action version of, ballistically, the same caliber.) You couldn't make a better deer cartridge, or a more versatile one. It's easy and fun to get caught up in all the gun magazine hype about the new calibers, but the fact is, it's hard to improve on the old standard. Buy a .308 or .30-06 first, and you'll be covered for everything. Only purchase a specialty caliber after you know you need one. (chances are, you won't)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Grabs

No matter which caliber you decide you want, I would highly recommend looking at a 550 Lux by CZ. These guns are great and and will compete with the best of the American made guns, but at a fraction of the cost.

I bought a .30-06 550 Lux two years ago and love it. This past year I added a Bushnell 4200 Elite in a 1.5x6. Great combo for deer hunting in heavier brush areas and during drives.

If you need more info about these guns or where to find the best deals let me know, I found large price differences out there.

graberc@msoe.edu

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest

Ive shot a 270 browning bar for years tough to beat the 270 cliber I just bought last year a 7mm ultra mag for hunting out west but at distance within 400 yards im still more comfortable with the 270. If i hhad it to do over again the 270 ultra short puts up really impressive numbers and cant be near the cannon the 7 mm ultra mag is. The 270 alone is plenty of rifle for elk. many elk have been taken with them. If you dont put the bullet where it conts you could shoot a howitzer and lose game. Just my 2 cents good luck and pay a lot of attention two optics i put a sheppard on my ultra but i wish i had put a nikon instead

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Grand River Zip

I also shoot a .308. Tell me about this WSM. I am guessing that is one of the short cartridge? I really don't follow all the updated equipment. Thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jwilli7122

Grand- the WSMs (winchester short magnums) are short, fat cartridges that provide magnum ballistics in short action rifles, which are inherently sturdier, and therefor, sometimes more accurate than long-action rifles. Short action guns also can be shorter and lighter than long action guns, if desired. Supposedly, the short magnums are also more efficient than the old magnums like the 300 win. and the 7mm mag. This has to do with the way the powder burns. So, they can get equal ballistics with less powder- and less kick. So, if you want 7mm mag ballistics, you can now get them in a WSM chambered gun which, all other things being equal, should be smaller, more accurate and should kick less. Why anyone would need magnum ballistics for anything in Minnesota is another question.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jwilli7122

grand- I should mention that there are currently 3 WSMs (unless they just came out with a new one): 270 WSM, 7mm WSM and 300 WSM. ballistically, the 7mm WSM is approximately equal to the old 7mm mag, while the 300 WSM is approximately equal to the 300 winchester mag. The 270 WSM is faster than the 270, and I think it's almost as fast as the 270 weatherby.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
simplefish

The only really big differance between normal rifles and wsm's is that wsm's have more powder and burn their powder more efficiantly in the shorter fatter shells than normals do in their longer thinner shells. This causes the wsm's to gain a few hundred feet per second more than the normal rifle, but also causes more kick. The guns are shorter and in some cases lighter than their longer counterparts. They shoot the same bullets though, but are usually fitted with higher end bullets, winchester uses silvertips (my fav) and fail safes, Remington loads partitions, and Lazzaeroni loads sierra or nosler partitions. My Favorite setup is the .270 Wichester short mag. with the Ballistic Silver tip or the Partition. I believe they have smaller bullet weights, and in MN you don't need anything big. Smaller bullets waste less meat and kill em' just as dead. And they are easy to reload, just use a good bullet, a slow burning powder and standard primers. But the factory loads will get the job done just fine. Hope this helps.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
benelli_dude2002

They got a 223 WSSM ( winchester super short mag ) which is quite a bit faster than the 22-250 and there is also a 243 WSSM. Which might be my next one. It would be a good varmint caliber and I wouldnt care it cuts the critter in half cuz I dont eat them and it would still be legal for deer. Just my 2 cents. Brian

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jlm

If you are looking to spend a little more $$ for a gun that will last a lifetime, I would seriously consider the .270WM, the .300WM, the .340WM or the 30.338WM (I think I did that right). My personal opinion is that these are some of the best factory rifles made and have great acc. and traj. I would also take a look at the Lazzaroni rifles, they have some great guns to. The shell prices are a little more but you also get great factory loads that are very accurate. Someone mentioned that the 30-06 was Americas favorite gun but I would dispute that, I think that recognition belongs to the good old 30-30 or some of us call it the dirty thirty! Good luck, they are all great guns that you will someday pass to your sons or grand sons! Don't go cheap on the scope either!!!!!!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Lunker

Go with a 270! I love mine and it's a great gun for target, deer, or every other big game Animal In the country(besides grizzlies), or even varmits and predators. Long shooter, but still got some power.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
simplefish

I was looking at something the other day and it said that the only differance between the .270 and the 7mm is that the 7mm bullet generally weights 10 grains more. The trajectory and speed are almost identical. You can take just about anything with either cartridge. The only native N. American big game animals I wouldn't try either one is the moose and the grizzly/brown bear. For that I would at least take a .300 in the woods with me, preferably a .338. Good scopes are a must. Spend as much or more on one as you would on the gun. With scopes you get what you pay for.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
benelli_dude2002

I would go with any of these calibers and i would have to disagree with not using the 270 on moose. I have used a 270 on moose for years and it has never failed me. I seen my dad take his longest shot ever on a moose with his 270 and dropped it in its tracks. Shot placement is key. I know i shouldnt say this but I watched one of my cousins shoot 9pt buck with a regular 22 LR and it fell right in its tracks. So any caliber that you mention should be good for just about any big game out there. Good luck and Happy hunting Brian

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jlm

The .270 is a good gun and the .270 magnums are even a better gun but I would not use this on a moose or a bear. Shot placement is the key and I would agree totally on that. However, if you are hunting for moose, even a direct hit in the heart will rarely take down a moose "in its tracks" unless you shoot him in the head or his spine. It does not have enough energy to produce the hydrostatic shock needed to bring the animal down in its tracks. Can it hapeen? Yes. Will it always happen...no way. Why is this important? Well, its getting to the point in MN where you need to bring the animal down right away because if it runs onto another parties land and they say you can't retieve it, you are out of luck. That is a terrible loss especially for such an awesome trophy such as a moose. If you have a caliber that has more energy and more knock down power, your odds of taking the animal down right away increase with good shot placement. That is not to say that they will go down all the time right away either, but your odds are much better. If you plant to hunt moose and deer with the same claiber, I would go with at least a .300 WM, WSM, Weatherby Mag, or even a larger caliber. Good luck!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
simplefish

I agree with jlm. The .270 is a fine cartridge but it just doesn't have enough energy transferance for my likings. Why choose a rather small cartridge for moose or b. bear when we have such a wide range of other calibers that will take the animal more cleanly and effectivly. For anything bigger than an elk I will always choose at least a .300. It's simple, bigger animal, bigger bullet. More energy transferance. That's not to say that you can't take either game with a .270. It can and has been done. I just wouldn't pick it for my alaskan moose, bear hunt. Or especially for my once in a lifetime hunt in MN. At long ranges the bullet makes the 1000 pound limit for deer sized game but I like more punch for something like a moose. Especially if they are close range. Them suckers can get testy. It's personal preferance and what you can shoot strait and have confidence in. For me it's a .270 for deer and such and a .300 or .338 for moose, b. bear. I just don't have confidence in the .270 for larger game. This got long and I may have repeated myself a couple of times but I am to lazy to re-read it and edit it. Good hunting.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
benelli_dude2002

not to stir anything up but I think the 270 is just fine for moose. It may not be my first choice of caliber but it would be one of them. I'm fortunate enough to hunt these big critters every fall and my dad does too. Now that i got this 300 WSM I 'm going to try that this fall. I have shot several moose with my 270 and watch them go down quickly. Only 2 moose I seen drop in its tracks was shot with a 12 gauge and my 7mm but they were fairly close. I think it makes a difference too if the animal is being pushed and they are all pumped up. i remember one cow moose i shot and she was running towards me and i shot once and she was still coming at me so i shot 2 more times with my 7mm rem mag before she fell 15 feet away. We later dicovered that the first shot went through the heart and the other 2 not too far off. every year there is some new caliber coming out or they make it better. BUt like mentioned before shot placement is the key. as far as other big game goes like grizzly or alaskan moose go with a bigger caliber. Like someone mentioned too put some good optics on it. Hope whatever you shoot works good for you and best of luck hunting this fall. Cuz it aint that far way. Happy hunting Brian

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
J Boo

I was down at Cabelas yesterday and bought my gun. I went with the 7mm WSM with a Leopold 3x9x40 on it. Haven't shot it yet but I can't wait to. What would be the best bullet weight and type for deer in Mn?
I was also wondering if anybody knows where I can sight my new gun in at. I live in Ramsey.
Thanks for everything!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  



  • Posts

    • Rick
      Now is the time to talk to kids about the dangers of thin ice. As temperatures continue to dip below freezing, ice is forming on many lakes, ponds and rivers. But conditions vary across the state.  Minnesota Department of Natural Resources conservation officer Hannah Mishler has already responded to multiple ice rescue calls. “Ice, especially snow covered ice, is extremely deceptive. You can’t see dangerous cracks or the thickness of the ice under the snow,” Mishler said. With many children out of school for holiday breaks, they may look toward the newly formed ice for entertainment. “Teach your children that ice is never 100 percent safe,” cautions Mishler. “If your child is near the ice, you should be near your child.” While adults and children are recreating outdoors, they should always take precautions around any body of water during the cold water season. Lisa Dugan, DNR recreation safety outreach coordinator, advises in addition to checking conditions locally and being prepared with an ice safety kit, anyone recreating on ice should be wearing a life jacket. “A life jacket is the one piece of equipment that increases your odds of not drowning from cold water shock, hypothermia or exhaustion should you fall through the ice.” Ice safety guidelines No ice can ever be considered “safe ice,” but following these guidelines can help minimize the risk: Always wear a life jacket on the ice (except when in a vehicle). When a child is near the ice, an adult should be near the child. Caution children to stay off ponds, streams, and other bodies of water. A thin coating of ice on a pond or lake does not mean it is safe. The minimum ice thickness guidelines for new, clear ice are: 4 inches for ice fishing or other activities on foot. 5-7 inches for a snowmobile or all-terrain vehicle. 8-12 inches for a car or small pickup. 12-15 inches for a medium truck. Double these minimums for white or ice covered with heavy snow. For more information, visit mndnr.gov/icesafety and mndnr.gov/boatingsafety. Discuss below - to view set the hook here.
    • Cret Jigs
      Good chance I will be there after 1pm.... thanks for putting this together.   Plan on bringing 4 wheeler. ... and hoping Daughter can make it :-)
    • monstermoose78
      @Cret Jigs
    • Wanderer
      It’s been interesting in Central MN so far.  There are plenty of lakes that have very walkable ice and ice that could hold ATV traffic but also several that stayed mostly to partly open for longer than expected.  Several lakes have both rideable ice and open water as of last weekend. There are only a couple lakes that I’ve been tracking that I would commit to an ATV ride on right now, especially with the new snow cover.  We lost the ability to see what “generation” of ice you were on this week.  On the plus side, we’ve had good ice making conditions all week. Short story: There are lakes that are ready to fish but don’t assume they all are.  Phone ahead to a resort or bait shop to find out about particular lakes if you don’t get the info here.  Buy your bait at the shop that gives you your key info. Be extra cautious this weekend until you’ve proven the ice you want to fish.
    • monstermoose78
      I moved this here as you will get better info
    • BRULEDRIFTER
      As far as I know, never been there.  I know it's great for splake, browns and lakers. 
    • JTeeth
      A return client for a couple years brought fish grips with him... After watching him mangle a couple fish I asked him not to bring them anymore. Big fish need more care when landing in my experience. I hand land most muskies. This helps with not bringing a green (not ready) fish into the boat to hurt itself and the boat. With musky fishing growing in popularity I'm noticing a lot more fish with net scars from green fish. For a young musky angler learn correct technique early. The scars after a 4 fish day are a badge of honor. One of the best gifts I've received for my musky gear is a good pair of wire cutters. I use them to cut hooks in an emergency or out of a poorly hooked fish. Or if you can find it...a jar of musky slime cologne, my wife loves it. Ha! Good luck
    • monstermoose78
      There was 7-10 inches last weekend 
    • ANYFISH2
      I have Hockey travels Saturday, good luck guys.
    • Horseshoe_Don
      Drove out the wheeler on the thickest ice.  Fishing for the first time. Had a solid 7" here.  But 50 yards away only 3".   Don