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DUCKJ

How do you choose a dog

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DUCKJ

Looking for some hints on what to look for in a dog. Mild manner?, playfull?, ect. Ive got 2 pups picked out and need some help in witch one to pick. Ill be looking at training it for duck hunting.

Duck

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Grabs

If you've done your home work and found a quality breeder with quality parents I wouldn't worry about which pup to pick. I personally think its really to hard to pick a pup at that age and see qualities that you are looking for in a great dog once he/she matures.

The pup should at least enjoy your company, other then that its tough to pick.

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gspman

DUCKJ,
I'll echo the above. Find a good breeder you feel you can trust, pick a breeding with a good pedigree, view the sire & dam hunting if possible. If you are happy with all of the above, then just reach in and grab a pup of the sex and markings/color/looks that you want. Trying to determine how a 5-8 week old pup will be when it grows up is not exactly a science. Doing your up front homework will increase your odds of getting what you want.
gspman

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bobber_down

In my opinion, you can get a pretty good idea of how a pup will be by watching them in the litter. It definately depends on the age at which you get your pup though... after 7 weeks old they really seem to get their pecking order set within the litter.

You don't want the shy pup because they tend not to be as outgoing and tend to shy away from new things. You don't want the "bully" of the litter, because they can be stubborn and hard headed. You want to find one in the middle of the pack. One that likes to wander a little and isn't afraid to investigate new things. One that is playful and wagging its little tail off...

[This message has been edited by bobber_down (edited 05-24-2004).]

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Jackpine Rob

In Richard Wolter's book Game Dog, he spends a fair bit of time describing the methods used to determine the various traits including dominance.

I used his methods twice, and got pretty much what I expected and hoped for each time. A good thing to try is to put a wing on a string, and see if the pups will chase it around. The dog that turns tail and tries to run away or hide probably isn't the one you want!

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Gill

I agree with what has been already posted. For the most past, picking the RIGHT LITTER is 95% of how to choose pups. However, I pose a question to those that say not to pick the most dominant pup. What happens if that pup is removed from the litter first? Won't another pup will just jump in and fulfill the role? On occasion, a pup will have an exceptionally nasty attitude towards its littermates. In that case choose another. But for the most part, follow the pedigree and your own trust of the breeder. There was a good article in this month’s NAVHDA publication. It described that the Best pup is specific to buyer requirements: Field champ or house pet, light or dark color, small or large, male or female, etc…A dog with field champion drive and energy may not make the best house pet.

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DUCKJ

Dose a male or female train better? On the same note, I have a female yellow lab now that dose not hunt. Will another female get along with the female I have now or should I go for a male?

Thanks for all your help

Duck

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irvingdog

Eeenie......meenie.....mineee......moe........

Ooh! Thank one is cute!

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Wild Willie

I have only picked out three gun dog pups in my life. The first two happened a long time ago and I did not get to see how they turned out. I had to give them away when they were barely a year old due to a job transfer back in the early 1980s.

I acquired my current pup when he was five months old. Females pups seem to always go first as they are the greatest in demand. The breeder I got my pup from was very helpful. He had time to pay close attention to how each of the three remaining male littermates were developing in regards to obedience training, socialization and pack order. We selected my pup because he displayed the most consistancy in obedience and was not the alpha of the three. All three had great hunting instincts but one was a little to head strong and the other displayed a hyper-sensitive nose. I believe we made the right choice.

From what I have heard from the experts you really need to take a close look at the personalities of the parents. Especially the female since more often than not more of her genes end-up in the pup than from the male. Make sure the pair have had several litters together to ensure they are throwing good healthy pups. After that has been done observe how all the pups interact with each other. How they react out in the yard and most of all how they react to you. Then make your choice and nine times out of ten you will get what your wanted.

It has been my experience that females can have a stronger will to serve/please than males and that they catch on faster as pups. The myth is that males are more head strong and thus harder to train and handle. Don't really believe it...but I'm sure it happens. Really just depends on the dogs personality and how much time you spend with him or her. Good luck and I'm sure you will select just the right pup for you and your family!

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setterguy

Now I know that it is hard to pick out a pup at such a young age and try and figure out what you are going to come out with but there are some signs of personality even at 8-10 weeks. I always want the most independent dog, not the most hyper or the trouble maker, but the one that isn't afraid to get out and explore thier surroundings. All things being equal I would let the pup choose you. Which one is most exited to see you, ect. I also echo the thoughts before, if you choose a good breeder that is breeding good dogs you really have taken out as much chance as possible and can only hope fot the best.

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Evenflow

ooops

[This message has been edited by Evenflow (edited 05-26-2004).]

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Evenflow

I agree, breeding will contain 95% what you are looking for in a pup, however I do believe you can see traits in a pup as early as 5 weeks. Last weekend my wife and I picked out a pup and after spending a few two hour sessions with the litter over a few weeks. After a couple of sessions, we were able to see some of the personalities of the pups.
I DEFINITELY agree to bring a wing on a string when given the chance. Not only will this be a great opportunity to see which pups like to use their nose, but it's also a great opportunity to see how the pups will react when presented with something new.
After playing with the wing with my top three picks from the litter, I found out my #1 choice was almost scared of the wing, and would run and hide in the bushes when presented with it. It really made me watch her more closely. So then I noticed that she seemed to act very passive agressive with the other pups, which was a big negative in my mind.
Now obviously how a dog reacts to people, stimuli, and it's siblings at 6 weeks isn't going to completely dictate how it acts once it's full grown. But a pup that is scared of a pheasant wing at 6 weeks isn't something I was willing risk. Besides, how could I pass up this face?

109-0940_IMG.jpg

Evenflow


------------------
It's all just theory till you hit the water.

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Bushwacker

Evenflow,
Wow that is a face a guy could fall in love with--- What breed is that? My wife and my lab is 9 months old as we were just talking last night about how we miss having a little pup running about and being crazy, then this morning our Libby jumped up and go a combo of freshly cut grass blades and mug all over my wife's suit skirt when she was putting her away on her way to work. I guess we still have a few parts of a pup around! Good luck with yours and have fun.

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Evenflow

She's a Brittany. When we went to go make the final decision she was a limp rag the entire time.

I'll post two other photos on another thread.

Evenflow

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jlm

Hey, just remember this, they will all pee in your house until they are trained! A good breeder with a good line of dogs is your best bet as others have stated. However, how the dog turns out depends on its owner/trainer (with a few exceptions of course).

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Snag

I went and saw the litter a couple of times before picking out a pup. You should be able to pick out the dominant and wallflower as most books note. Bring a sock if you don't have wings and see which pup has the most instinct for retreiving. As soon as you pick up your pup the training starts, my advice is be consistent and make sure everyone else in the family is too. Lots of fun ahead for you.

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DUCKJ

Well I did it, I picked up my pup. She is a black laband love to play.I have had her for a few days now and she seems to be picking up on things pretty quick. Going potty in the house may take a wile but I think she's learning. She loves to play and she even bring the things back most of the time. I forgot how much pups like to chew and so did the kids. They found out they cant leave there toys and dolls just laying around anymore.Hehe This is a good thing for mom and I. Once again thanks for all your help.

Duck

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setterguy

Congratulations on the addition to your family, wish you all the best in training and many days afield with your new partner. Best part about puppies is imagining all the places and things you will see together.

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