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Down to Earth

??Orange Carp??

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Down to Earth

I was walking over the 4th St Bridge on my way to the car and looked down and saw an orange carp swimming in the water. I had to do a double and triple take to make sure I was sure of what I was seeing. I stopped by a bit and talked to Mike about it. I've only seen them in captivity like a zoos and such. Anyone else seen the orange ones in the wild?

Andy

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vern

Sounds like a big goldfish or Koi as they are sometimes called. I've caught goldfish/Koi on a couple small lakes/ponds in the Mpls./metro area over the years that were as big as 2 lbs. Either they were stocked or someone released the family pet. Could that be what you saw? Just curious, where was this? I'm from Mpls. & don't know where the 4th St. bridge is. Thanks, Vern

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CrappieJohn

DTE/Vern....The fourth street bridge is close to downtown Rochester. And what you saw was probably a fish shop throw away. Asian countries raise these fish for food and as ornimental fish for elaborate ponds they maintain. As smaller fish they are all collectively called goldfish and in a closed environment ,like a fish tank, thier growth is controlled. When released into the wild they can achieve much larger sizes. Putting them in public waters is illegal! I don't think one will hurt much, but then again, the carp is not native to the north american continent either.

------------------
Sure life happens- why wait....The Crapster....good fishing guys!
TSJigs@aol.com

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Down to Earth

Thanks for the information guys. When I walked past this morning I took my usual glance down, but no orange fish. Did see 1 nice regular carp though. Are the carp and the goldfish/koi related at all? Thanks.

Andy

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CrappieJohn

Andy...I believe they are shirt-tail relatives....carp are originally European and koi are Asian. They both suck mud.

------------------
Sure life happens- why wait....The Crapster....good fishing guys!
TSJigs@aol.com

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nkambae

Goldfish and carp are related-same family (Cyprinidae). There is a reference to a goldfish x carp cross but I didn't read far enough to see if it was naturally occuring or artificial.

All the carps belong to the family cyprinidae, minnows and carps

Common/European/Asian/Koi/mirror/scale carp = Cyprinus carpio

Goldfish = Carassius auratus auratus - formerly Cyprinus auratus

Grass carp = Ctenopharyngodon idellus

Black carp = Mylopharyngodon piceus

Big head carp = Aristichthys nobilis

All these fish have been introduced into North American waters as a result of aquaculture, intentional planting, weed control, accidental release, etc. With the same result: bad news for our native fishes. Will we never learn?

This information came from Fish Base at http://www.fishbase.org and
The Master index of Freshwater Fishes at
http://www.webcityof.com/miffidx.htm

stu


[This message has been edited by nkambae (edited 09-02-2003).]

[This message has been edited by nkambae (edited 09-02-2003).]

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Lew

Well Stu, for your first time posting you sure had a lot to say. Good work on the research. Try not to hold back next time and feel free to speak out. lol I look forward to hearing more from you in the future. Welcome to this fun and interesting web site.

------------------
Lew

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Down to Earth

THanks everyone for the info. Just wanted to drop a note and let you know I saw my little orange friend again today.

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