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    • Rick

      Members Only Fluid Forum View   08/08/2017

      Fluid forum view allows members only to get right to the meat of this community; the topics. You can toggle between your preferred forum view just below to the left on the main forum entrance. You will see three icons. Try them out and see what you prefer.   Fluid view allows you, if you are a signed up member, to see the newest topic posts in either all forums (select none or all) or in just your favorite forums (select the ones you want to see when you come to Fishing Minnesota). It keeps and in real time with respect to Topic posts and lets YOU SELECT YOUR FAVORITE FORUMS. It can make things fun and easy. This is especially true for less experienced visitors raised on social media. If you, as a members want more specific topics, you can even select a single forum to view. Let us take a look at fluid view in action. We will then break it down and explain how it works in more detail.   The video shows the topic list and the forum filter box. As you can see, it is easy to change the topic list by changing the selected forums. This view replaces the traditional list of categories and forums.   Of course, members only can change the view to better suit your way of browsing.   You will notice a “grid” option. We have moved the grid forum theme setting into the main forum settings. This makes it an option for members only to choose. This screenshot also shows the removal of the forum breadcrumb in fluid view mode. Fluid view remembers your last forum selection so you don’t lose your place when you go back to the listing. The benefit of this feature is easy to see. It removes a potential barrier of entry for members only. It puts the spotlight on topics themselves, and not the hierarchical forum structure. You as a member will enjoy viewing many forums at once and switching between them without leaving the page. We hope that fluid view, the new functionality is an asset that you enjoy .
Chill62

2016 Detroit Lakes Area Fishing Reports

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Chill62

Went out this weekend for trout Saturday morning.  27 degrees and I had to thaw out the drain hole in my boat to thread in the plug.  Was on the water at 4:45 and we were bundled up tight but it was cold going across the water.  At one time the phone said it was 17 windchill.  We fished till 1 pm, fishing was slow but managed 7 trout (20", 16, 4 12-14").  After a well deserved afternoon nap we went to try a lake by Perham that the girlfriend has a lake place on and we went out to a crappie hole well when we got there with no live bait and medium light/UL gear notice they are all walleye fishing.  I didn't have any live bait so used a 2.5" gulp on a jig and was jigging that around on the break near shore.  Few norts up shallow but when you got 11-16 fow they fish were actively chasing bait fish.  I ended up getting a 17.5" eye, lost one right next to boat, and I hooked something that felt huge but with only 4 pound test I had to baby it and I lost it.  Went out the next day same lake and northerns were crazy feeding up shallow and saw a few eyes being pulled out on lindy's on the breaks of the weeds with shinners.  Everything was associated with standing cabbage.

How was everyone else's opener?

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paceman

Went to a small lake in Otter Tail County on the opener. Fished from 6:00 am until Noon. Yes it was very cold!. Glad I left my youg son at home. Even had ice forming in the boat and in the rod eyes!. Lindy rigging shiners we did very well. Limited out on nice eyes. Mostly 16-19". Fished fairly shallow wind driven points. 7-10'. Others that fished slow and shallow also did well on jigs. You just had to go slow. Boats that simply drifted with the wind or trolled to fast did not catch many. Water temp was 53.

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paceman

Went to a local lake for a quick trip last night after mowing the yard. Fished from 6:00 until 8:30. Mostly after crappies. Took me awhile to find them but when I did it was game on. simply tossing a small jig- plastics into and along emerging weedlines, 2-6 feet I caught 15 crappies, 9 sunnies, 14 snake northerns and a bonus 18" eye. Wasn't in the fish cleaning mode so everything went back. I like fishing Wednesdays as the lakes are usually quiet. I was on a pretty big lake but only saw 4 other boats!

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paceman

Went out super early Friday Morning and again Saturday evening to a little local lake. Walleyes were on fire. Lindy rig with shiners in 8-10 feet produced limits both times. Friday we caught most of them drifting with the wind and they were very aggressive. As soon as the sun came up and the wind laid down the fish moved out deeper and much softer bites. Saturday most were caught back trolling into the wind, they just wanted the bait to be moving slower and were not very aggressive. Just a little tick or just  weight from them hanging on. We missed 5-6 that came off as they were not well hooked. Looking at the forecast the hot bite should continue for awhile!

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Chill62

Went out saturday middle of the day ended up getting a few walleyes and a bunch of northerns.  Went back out in the afternoon/evening and it had died off but northerns were still active.  Right before dark they turned on like crazy hitting jig and a minnow and slip bobbers.  Walleyes were throwing up shiners so big time shiner bite right now.  8-14 fow was what we found but we also anchored most of the time due to three people in the boat and two inexperienced.

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bbfenatic

I am a crappie guy year around so no help with the "eyes"....I am finding the bigger crappies in their summer patterns already on area lakes...cabbage is close to being mature already with early ice out and finding them concentrated pretty good in that 10-12' range in the cabbage or right on the outer edge of cabbage, any pink plastics (no live bait needed) is the key.  Good Luck!

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Chill62
13 minutes ago, bbfenatic said:

I am a crappie guy year around so no help with the "eyes"....I am finding the bigger crappies in their summer patterns already on area lakes...cabbage is close to being mature already with early ice out and finding them concentrated pretty good in that 10-12' range in the cabbage or right on the outer edge of cabbage, any pink plastics (no live bait needed) is the key.  Good Luck!

When we were walleye fishing we ended up pulling up two very nice crappies on Shiners.  We were on a break but there wasn't any cabbage laying around so I don't know what they were doing out there.  One was caught reeling in so they must have been suspended both were last light.

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AKAL

I got out this past weekend as well. I utilized the full moon Saturday and Sunday. Pulled flicker shads in 4-8 fow launched the boat at midnight fished till the sun started to rise, caught quite a few nice eyes most were caught closer to the 7 fow going 1.7-1.9 mph. Tried jigs with shiners with no success but I do not care to use them so didn't give them a fair shot.

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paceman

I did not do as well last night. Gorgeous evening out though! Lindy rigging shiner my first fish was a 8" sunfish! hungry little fellow! Caught quite a few northerns, bass. Missed quite a few but I think they were crappies as I finally hooked a few of them. Did catch 1 18" eye but it was the only one. Worked that spot for another hour but nothing else. Really peaceful out, lake went to glass and very few other boats out. Will probably be a zoo out there this weekend... Will go to a smaller out of the way lake up in the woods:)

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paceman

Only made it out for a few hours Saturday afternoon with my son. Tough weekend with Graduations and family stuff and then had to be on the Cities Monday/Tuesday.. We decided a quick panfish trip would be fun. To say the crappies were on fire would be an understatement. Jack caught the first one in about 15 seconds after turning off the motor. I let him fill the box. I tosses all of mine back but in about half an hour he caught our 2 man limit of perfect 10-12" fish. Simply casting small jigs/plastics in 9-10 feet along the weeds worked great for us. Once done we went home cleaned them and had an awesome fish fry. now I just need tyo find time to get back out again..

Jack Crappies.jpg

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Chill62

Got out this weekend and did really well on walleyes.  Early in the morning the fish were 8-10 fow till around 9 am then they slowly tappered out to deeper water and at noon we were in 16 fow still catching them.  They were liking a jig in a minnow and I was using Northland's Fire Ball Jigs tipped with a shiner.  Half the fish were hooked right next to the throat they were hitting them so hard.  Kept 11 fish and released 2-22" and 2-18.5" slot fish.  Was a fun time.

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bbfenatic

Been out chasing crappies when weather permits. Have found them on several diff lakes both S and N of DL in the cabbage 8-12' deep.  With these up and down temps this spring females were confused and many did not even lay eggs so will absorb them and not drop them unfortunately....I found beds this year deeper than I ever have and only had a couple outings where I caught all males protecting beds. Buddy with 14.5" caught on edge of cabbage in 12'

crappie53016 (2).jpg

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paceman

Finally found time to wet a line Saturday Afternoon. I chose a small out of the way lake hoping it would not be very crowded. I did not chose wisely as the lake was very busy with pleasure boaters and other fisherman. Lot's of folks were panfishing the shorelines. Which is good for me as the mid lake humps were empty and I prefer to chase walleyes. Lindy Rigging crawlers on the windblown humps was really quite productive. Amongst the bazillion small northerns, sunnies and rock bass  we managed to put 8 very nice 16-19" eyes in the box. We also tossed 2 smaller ones and 2 bigger ones back. Good to be on the water again!

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bbfenatic

I have built a 12 month calendar over the years which shows me where to catch crappies, on what lake, what spot any week of any month.  I went to two guaranteed spots on a popular lake Saturday and no crappies...none...surprisingly I was pulling eyes one after another out of the cabbage I usually catch crappies out of....water so clear I also watched many "eyes" follow up to my boat....just using plastics.  I am stumped for the first time in many years and first time out in many outings both summer and winter I did not catch a single crappie.  Strange year with early ice out, warm then cold then warm then cold again...just hope things get back to normal soon or I will have to go "on the hunt" again and start a second calendar of crappie spots cuz I refuse to become a walleye guy!

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Chill62

Sorry for the later post.  Went trout fishing on Saturday morning at the crack of dawn.  Got there around 5:15 and before I could get the other rod rigged up we caught two for the livewell.  We caught 9 lost four and one was huge.  We tried for two hours to get our tenth fish and didn't succeed.  So we switched to bass fishing and caught an easy dozen in an hour before it was getting too warm for us.  Biggest trout was 19", biggest bass was 17" and all bass were released.  The big bass had a crawfish sticking out of his gut.

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KEN W

Is the Mayfly hatch over yet?

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paceman

Lots of lakes over here and they all seem to hatch along with a  variety of other bugs at different times. Some lakes are done, some are in the middle and some haven't even started yet. Lots of fish being caught right now, It is a great time of the year to get out!

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bklimek

I'm headed to Big Pelican for the first time next week.  I'm super bummed because my Ranger will be in the shop.  Was looking forward to fishing some smallmouth, walleyes, and panfish.  How has fishing been on pelican?

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paceman

Buzzed out early Saturday morning before the lake got busy. Launched at 5:00 am. The lake was dead calm which I don't like for eye fishing but I had the lake to myself for the first couple hours.  Fished until 8:30 then had to leave for kids sporting activities. I only caught 4 fish but they were very good quality. Lindy rigging a crawler in 18-20' produced a 19, 21, 24, and a 26" eye. As I was leaving the wind was finally starting to blow and more boats were showing up. I would imagine the fish catching only got better!

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paceman

Fished the last 2 hours of light last night on a local lake that is not well known for eyes. But it is close to my house and I did not have much time. As expected I caught everything but walleyes. Northerns, bass, crappies, sunnies.... Interesting as the wind switch 180 degrees while out there. Water temp was 71.7. A few coworkers did really well on a different lake with leeches. I was using mostly crawlers...

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Chill62

Sorry for lateness of the post but I've been super busy with work.  Gotta love it when you are a few people down but they want more stuff done.  

Did a big camping and fishing trip over Father's Day weekend.  Caught 32 trout between our boats biggest being 20" average around 14".  When we weren't trout fishing we switched to small mouth and caught about 20/25 ish.  Few were in that 16-18" mark but mostly around 10-12".  They were not up shallow but on the edges of the breaks.  Sure if you trolled or slower presentation would have caught more because I"ve never seen so many big bass before in my life, notice how I said SEEN!  Very disappointing watching two four pounders swimming right by your lure!

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bjamin

Got out at sunrise until about 9 am on Wednesday with the kids. Thought we'd try a little trolling for walleye right away and then switch to panfish, but we kept catching a walleye here and there and we were getting enough bites that the kids wanted to keep fishing for walleye (no objection from me). The fish we caught were in 20-25 ft of water near the bottom of the drop-offs, all on spinners with crawlers or leeches. 

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paceman

Hopefully everyone enjoyed the wonderful weekend. The weather was fabulous! I only made it out fishing a couple times and was pleasantly surprised as to how well we did! I love to get up super early and try to be the first ones on the lake. Did that both Saturday and Sunday on 2 different DL area lakes. Launched the boat at 5:00 am. Off about 9:30 before the weekend riftraft arrived. 2 man limits of nice walleyes. 18-22'. Spinners-leeches. They hit them hard! Friday afternoon I took my son and one of his buddies out after crappies. Took us a while to find them but we did. Had to be right on the weed edge. Simple jig/plastics in 9-10' on this lake was the ticket for a livewell full of good eaters!

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Chill62

I fished Saturday morning for trout, my uncle was up from Texas and we ended up getting 11 for the four of us.  He was sure happy because he doesn't fish that often aka once a year when he comes up to visit and he out fished everyone else.  Sunday was a bit too windy for us on Big Pine so we stayed on shore but we tried to sneak out a few times on Monday with mixed results.  We tried some new spots and caught three eyes in the morning.  One hit on a crawler and I mean HIT like a freight train and the other two were on leeches all 16".  Tried jigs with nothing but perch.  Tuesday I took off and hit my favorite crappie hole and they were biting.  58 crappies, 9 blue gills, 1 bass, and 1 northern all on fake bait.  Had best luck with either glow pink solid or a clear pink with sparkles that glows.  They were in the shape of insects and were amazing!  Blue Gills prefered a 2 1/4" clear green over my 3" pinks.  All fish were caught in that 6-14' of water in the cabbage.  I was using a tube jig that was glow white with pink swirl "Lava" as the company calls it and that was awesome!  You had to fish down in the cabbage so I was using my 6' 6" UL swimming the jig through the weeds.  There was no doubt when you got a bite though!!!

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Chill62

Got out this afternoon with a buddy of mine on a small lake.  Threw the same stuff I threw at them on Tuesday and the crappies were still up in that 6-13 feet of water but the big ones were not up there like they were on Tuesday.  My white jig with Lava Pink on it was the hot ticket until I lost it, I was very heart broken!  Key colors were still pinks, I tried a ton of other colors but shades of pink were the best luck.  The old man got mad because I threw everything back on Tuesday so I kept a limit of 12-13.5" crappies.  Half of them still had a small deposit of eggs within them so I do not know if the bigger ones have spawned and have gone out to deeper to recover or not.  Water temp was 79 degrees but I'm not 100% confident since I screwed up my transducer two weeks ago and may need to replace it.

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      No chronic wasting disease was detected in more than 11,000 precautionary samples from deer that hunters harvested this fall in north-central, central and southeastern Minnesota, according to the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources.  “This is good news for Minnesota,” said Lou Cornicelli, wildlife research manager for the DNR. “The results lend confidence that the disease is not spread across the landscape.” In all, 7,813 deer were tested in the north-central area, 2,529 in the central area and 1,149 in the southeastern area outside deer permit area 603, the CWD management zone. Researchers still are submitting samples from cooperating taxidermists so final results will updated online at mndnr.gov/cwdcheck as they become available. Given no deer with CWD were found in north-central and central Minnesota, the DNR will narrow surveillance next fall to areas closer to the farms where CWD was detected. A fourth precautionary surveillance area will be added in fall 2018 in Winona County because CWD recently was detected in captive deer there. Precautionary testing in north-central and central Minnesota became necessary after CWD was found in multiple captive deer on farms near Merrifield in Crow Wing County and Litchfield in Meeker County. It also was conducted in the deer permit areas directly adjacent to southeast Minnesota’s deer permit area 603, the only place in Minnesota where CWD is known to exist in wild deer. Minnesota’s CWD response plan calls for testing of wild deer after the disease is detected in either domestic or wild deer. All results from three consecutive years of testing must report CWD as not detected before DNR stops looking for the disease. Three years of testing are necessary because CWD incubates in deer slowly. They can be exposed for as long as 18 months before laboratory tests of lymph node samples can detect the disease. Proactive surveillance and precautionary testing for CWD is a proven strategy that allows the DNR to manage the disease by finding it early and reacting quickly and aggressively to control it. These actions, which were taken in 2005 to successfully combat bovine tuberculosis in northwestern Minnesota deer and in 2010 to eliminate a CWD infection in wild deer near Pine Island, provide the best opportunity to eliminate disease spread. Precautionary testing is necessary to detect the disease early. Without early detection, there’s nothing to stop CWD from becoming established at a relatively high prevalence and across a large geographic area. At that point, there is no known way to control the disease. “Overall, hunter cooperation and public support has been tremendous,” Cornicelli said. “While there are always challenges when you conduct this type of surveillance effort, it really couldn’t have been successful without the cooperation of hunters, taxidermists, landowners and the businesses that allowed us to operate check stations.” Complete information about CWD and DNR efforts to keep Minnesota deer healthy are available on the DNR website at mndnr.gov/cwd. Discuss below - to view set the hook here.
    • Rick
      Boundaries for a special late-season deer hunt to help control chronic wasting disease in southeastern Minnesota’s Fillmore County have been expanded to include portions of three surrounding deer permit areas, the Department of Natural Resources said.  The expansion of boundaries for the nine-day hunt that lasts from Saturday, Jan. 6, to Sunday, Jan. 14, became necessary when CWD test results of harvested deer revealed two infected deer in Forestville State Park and a suspected infection north of the disease’s core area around Preston.  During the upcoming hunt, deer may be taken in an approximate 10-mile radius surrounding the new discoveries. That area includes all of deer permit area 603 as well as the portion of permit area 345 south of Interstate 90, the southern portion of permit area 347 and the northern portion of permit area 348. A map of the area and complete details are available on the DNR’s website at mndnr.gov/cwd. “Hunters must plan ahead,” said Lou Cornicelli, the DNR’s wildlife research manager. “Private land makes up most of the area and hunters must have landowner permission. Public land in the area likely will be crowded. And hunting opportunities will be limited and available only by permit at Forestville State Park and Pin Oak Prairie Scientific and Natural Area.” Within 24 hours of harvest, each deer must be taken to one of four stations where DNR staff will register the deer and collect lymph node tissue for CWD testing. All electronic registration will be turned off. With the exception of fawns, deer cannot be moved from the hunt area without a test result that shows CWD was not detected. Prior to test results, hunters may properly quarter their deer and bone-out meat but the head, spinal column and all brain material must remain in the area until the animal’s test results show a not-detected status. Designated dumpsters where hunters can dispose of carcasses and parts will be available in Preston and Forestville. A refrigerated trailer will be available in Preston for temporary storage of the entire carcass if hunters choose to wait for the test result before processing their deer. After receiving a not-detected test result for the deer, the hunter can take the entire deer out of the area. Since the mid-September start of the archery season 1,334 deer have been tested in permit area 603 and results have shown six confirmed and one suspect cases of CWD. Although the number of CWD-infected deer is down from the 11 positives found last season, three of the new positives were found outside the core area. “We were glad to see the prevalence go down but we’re unsure if we have a disease expansion or if males recently moved into a new area,” Cornicelli said. “Test results of deer taken during this special hunt will help us determine what the new disease management zone boundary will look like in 2018.” Complete information about CWD and DNR efforts to keep Minnesota deer healthy are available on the DNR website at mndnr.gov/cwd. Special hunt rules Hunt dates are Jan. 6-14, 2018. Hunt is open to residents and nonresidents. There is no bag limit, the antler point restriction will be eliminated in this area and cross-tagging (party hunting) will be allowed. Hunters can use any unfilled 2017 license or purchase disease management tags for $2.50. You do not need a deer hunting license to purchase disease management tags, which are valid for deer of either sex. Legal firearms are shotguns, muzzleloader or crossbows using either a firearm or muzzleloader license. Archery equipment must be used if the person is hunting with an archery license. Centerfire rifles are not allowed. All deer must be registered in person at one of the stations below. Registration stations will be staffed 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. daily during the season: Chatfield – Magnum Sports, 20 Main St. S; Preston – Preston Forestry office, 912 Houston St.; Forestville State Park; Rushford – Pam’s Corner Convenience, at the intersection of Minnesota highways 16 and 43. Submission of a CWD sample is mandatory. All deer will be tagged and tested by DNR staff. Fawns will be allowed to leave the zone. Carcasses from adult deer must remain in the zone until a “not detected” test is reported. This test takes three to four business days so hunters should make the appropriate arrangements prior to killing a deer. Test results can be checked on the DNR website at mndnr.gov/cwdcheck or by calling the DNR Information Center at 888-646-6367. Hunting at Forestville, Pin Oak Prairie and Cherry Grove
      Forestville State Park and Pin Oak Prairie SNA will both be open to limited deer hunting during the special hunt. To avoid overcrowding, permits for these areas will be issued on a first come, first served basis starting at noon on Monday, Dec. 18. Forestville State Park will remain open to visitors during the special hunt. Hunters must have a filled or unfilled 2017 firearm or muzzleloader license to obtain a permit. There is no group application for these hunts. Permits can be obtained online or wherever DNR licenses are sold. There is no fee for these permits. The same hunt rules as described for permit area 603 apply to these areas. Successful hunters can use any unfilled tag, or purchase disease management permits for $2.50. Specific hunt numbers, dates and available permits are: 801: Forestville State Park, Jan. 6-9, 2018, 130 permits. 802: Forestville State Park, Jan. 10-14, 2018,130 permits. 803: Pin Oak Prairie SNA, Jan. 6-9, 2018, five permits. 804: Pin Oak Prairie SNA, Jan. 10- 14, 2018, five permits. The Cherry Grove Blind Valley SNA, which adjoins the Cherry Grove Wildlife Management Area, also is open to deer hunting and no special permit is required. Food safety
      The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that, to date, there have been no reported cases of CWD infection in people. However, the CDC advises people not to eat meat from animals known to have CWD. Go to www.cdc.gov for more information. Discuss below - to view set the hook here.
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      Pheasant hunters still have time to harvest roosters this December.  “We had a late corn harvest which affected the early pheasant season but things are shaping up nicely for late-season hunting,” said Nicole Davros, farmland wildlife research supervisor for the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. “Additionally, despite the lower overall count on our roadside surveys this year, our rooster index went up slightly. This means there are still birds to chase out there.” Field conditions were wet enough that the corn harvest was significantly delayed this fall. “Now that the crops are out of the fields, there are fewer places to hide and hunters should be seeing more roosters,” Davros said. Despite warmer weather in late November, pheasants are already using both grassland cover and winter cover such as cattail sloughs and willow thickets, according to Scott Roemhildt, DNR Walk-in Access Program coordinator. “Hunters who are willing to work these tougher-to-reach areas will have opportunities to harvest birds,” Roemhildt said. “The colder weather in our forecast will make wetlands more accessible to hunters as the water freezes up.” Both Davros and Roemhildt agree that late-season pheasant hunting is a great excuse to get away from the hustle and bustle of the holiday season, regardless of whether any roosters are put in your bag. “Pheasant hunting is a great way to stretch your legs and clear your mind when things get hectic,” Davros said. Added Roemhildt: “It’s also a chance to introduce someone new to pheasant hunting as kids get time off from school and family comes to visit.” On Dec. 1, the daily bag limit increased to three roosters with a possession limit of nine roosters. Hunters need a small game license and a pheasant stamp to hunt pheasants in Minnesota. A small game license costs $22 for Minnesota residents age 18 to 64, and the pheasant stamp costs $7.50. Pheasant hunters 65 and older need to buy a small game license for $13.50 but are not required to buy a stamp. Hunters age 16 to 17 must buy a $5 small game license but do not need to buy a stamp, and hunters under 16 can hunt pheasants without a license or stamp. Hunters can also purchase a Walk-In Access validation for $3 to gain additional public hunting opportunities on private land that is enrolled in the program. As of September, 25,335 acres of land across 241 sites in western and southern Minnesota have been enrolled in the program. Minnesota’s 2017 pheasant season is open through Monday, Jan. 1. Shooting hours are 9 a.m. to sunset. Additional details on pheasant hunting are available at mndnr.gov/hunting/pheasant. Additional details on the Walk-In Access Program are available at mndnr.gov/walkin. Discuss below - to view set the hook here.
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      The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources is accepting public comments on an environmental assessment worksheet (EAW) prepared for the Wright Bog Horticultural Peat project in Carlton County, about 8 miles west of Cromwell.  Premier Horticulture, Inc. proposes to develop approximately 316 acres of the Wright Bog in Carlton County for horticultural peat extraction. The proposed site would be cleared and ditched, with drained water discharged into Little Tamarack River. Sphagnum moss peat would be collected using the milled peat vacuum harvesting method. The agency will take comments during a 30-day public review period ending at 4:30 p.m. Jan. 10. A copy of the EAW is available online on the project page.  A hard copy may be requested by calling 651-259-5126. The EAW is available for public review at: DNR library, 500 Lafayette Road, St. Paul. DNR northeast regional office, 1201 East Highway 2, Grand Rapids. Minneapolis Central Library, Government Documents, 2nd Floor, 300 Nicollet Mall. Duluth Public Library, 520 West Superior Street, Duluth. Carlton Public Library, 213 Chestnut Avenue, Carlton. McGregor Public Library, Center Avenue and Second Street, McGregor. The EAW notice will be published in the Dec. 11 EQB Monitor. Written comments must be submitted no later than 4:30 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 10, to the attention of Bill Johnson, EAW project manager, Environmental Policy and Review Unit, Ecological and Water Resources Division, DNR, 500 Lafayette Road, St. Paul, MN 55155-4025. Electronic or email comments may be sent to environmentalrev.dnr@state.mn.us with “Wright Bog” in the subject line. If submitting comments electronically, include name and mailing address. Written comments may also be sent by fax to 651-296-1811. Names and addresses will be published as part of the EAW record. Discuss below - to view set the hook here.
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      A walleye stamp can be a gift for an angler that keeps giving, because stamp sales help the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources provide more places to fish for walleye by stocking walleye into lakes where there would be none. “Anyone can buy a walleye stamp any time of the year, even if they don’t have a fishing license,” said Neil Vanderbosch, DNR fisheries program consultant. “The collectible stamp is based on art chosen in our annual stamp contest.” Funds from walleye stamps go toward the cost of purchasing walleye from private fish farms for stocking into lakes. A walleye stamp is not required to fish for or keep walleye. There are several ways to purchase a walleye stamp. Anyone can go to a license agent and purchase a pictorial walleye stamp for $5.75, which is mailed to the buyer. Copies are on hand for purchase from the DNR License Center at 500 Lafayette Road in St. Paul. The stamps can be purchased online at mndnr.gov/buyalicense or by phone by calling 888-665-4236. Alternatively, a form can be downloaded from mndnr.gov/stamps and returned to the DNR to have the stamp mailed. Anglers with a fishing license can purchase the walleye stamp validation for $5, and for an extra 75 cents can have the pictorial stamp mailed to them. “True, everybody has to buy their own stamp, but there’s nothing stopping a person from giving away the collectible as a gift,” Vanderbosch said. “It could make a statement about how you helped improve an angler’s opportunity to catch walleye.” The overall walleye stocking effort ramps up each year in April when fisheries staff collect walleye eggs, fertilize them and transport the eggs to fish hatcheries around Minnesota. The eggs spend two to three weeks incubating before hatching into fry that are soon released – two thirds into lakes and one third into rearing ponds. The fish in rearing ponds grow into 4- to 6-inch fingerlings that are stocked into lakes in the fall. In addition to raising and stocking walleye, the DNR also buys walleye fingerlings from private producers to be stocked into lakes, and walleye stamp sales help pay for these fish. Since 2009, funds from the walleye stamp have purchased over 40,000 pounds of walleye fingerlings that have been stocked in the fall, all over the state. Walleye are stocked in lakes that don’t have naturally reproducing walleye populations. Anglers catch the lion’s share of walleye from waters where the fish reproduce naturally – about 260 larger walleye lakes and in large rivers. Because of stocking, walleye can be found in an additional 1,050 Minnesota lakes spread throughout the state. More information about habitat stamps can be found at mndnr.gov/stamps. Discuss below - to view set the hook here.
    • Rick
      The deadline for firearms wild turkey hunters to apply for early season spring hunting permits is Friday, Jan. 26, according to the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. The spring season, which runs from Wednesday, April 18, to Thursday, May 31, is divided into six time periods. Only people age 18 and older who want to hunt using a firearm during the first two time periods (A or B) need to apply for a spring turkey permit. Permits for the remaining time periods (C-F) can be purchased over-the-counter. Archery and youth turkey hunters can hunt the entire season without applying for the lottery. Permits for the last four time periods and youth licenses are sold starting March 1. Surplus adult licenses from the first two time periods, if available, are sold starting around mid-March. People applying for permit area 511, the Carlos Avery State Wildlife Management Area, are advised that the sanctuary portion of the WMA will be closed to turkey hunting except for the special hunt for hunters with disabilities. For turkey hunting, a person may only use shotguns 20 gauge or larger, including muzzleloading shotguns. Only fine shot size No. 4 and smaller diameter may be used, and red dot scopes and range finders are legal. Visit mndnr.gov/hunting/turkey for more information about turkey hunting. Discuss below - to view set the hook here.
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      The commissioner of the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources has appointed 11 Minnesotans to three-year terms on citizen oversight committees that monitor the agency’s fish and wildlife spending.  The appointees are responsible for reviewing the DNR’s annual Game and Fish Fund report in detail and, following discussions with agency leaders and others, prepare reports on their findings. Appointed to the Wildlife Oversight Committee are Garry Hooghkirk, Duluth; Amanda Leabo, Fergus Falls; Mark Popovich, Welch; John Schnedler, Richfield; and Martha Taggett, Golden Valley. Appointed to the Fisheries Oversight Committee are Karl Anderson, Greenbush; Jess Edberg, Ely; Nicole Hertel, Shoreview; Benjamin Kohn, Hudson; Mark Owens, Austin; and Craig Pagel, Duluth. The new appointees join other members whose terms are continuing. The committees will resume work after the mid-December publication of the DNR’s Game and Fish Fund report for fiscal year 2017. “We look forward to working with these citizens,” said Dave Schad, DNR deputy commissioner. “The appointments continue our commitment to share detailed budget information, bring new participants into the oversight process and ensure revenue generated by hunting and fishing license sales is used appropriately.” The Fisheries and Wildlife oversight committees continue a citizen oversight function first created in 1994. Sixty people applied for oversight committee positions this time. Factors in choosing the new appointees included geographic distribution, demographic diversity and a mix of interests. In the weeks ahead, committee chairs and four members will be selected by each committee to serve on an umbrella Budgetary Oversight Committee chaired by another appointee, John Lenczewski. The committee will develop an overall report on expenditures for game and fish activities. Those recommendations will be delivered to the DNR commissioner and legislative committees with jurisdiction over natural resources financing for further consideration. Minnesota’s Game and Fish Fund is the fiscal foundation for much of the state’s core natural resource management functions. About $110 million a year is deposited into this fund from hunting and fishing license sales, a sales tax on lottery tickets, and other sources of revenue including a reimbursement based on a federal excise tax on certain hunting, fishing and boating equipment. Past DNR Game and Fish Fund expenditure reports and citizen oversight committee reports are also available at mndnr.gov/gamefishoversight. Discuss below - to view set the hook here.
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      Conservation grants awarded by the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources will help restore, enhance and protect habitat throughout the state.  This latest round of 73 conservation grants is funded by the agency’s Conservation Partners Legacy (CPL) grant program. Now in its ninth year, the program has awarded over $50 million to nonprofit organizations and government entities for conservation projects. The DNR recently received $9.9 million in grant requests from 86 applicants during round one of the application cycle. The DNR has funded $7.5 million of these requests. “Projects include habitat improvements that benefit deer, turkey, pheasants and a wide variety of species,” said Jessica Lee, DNR conservation grants coordinator. “Oak savanna, wetlands and pollinator habitat are restored through this grant program, to give a few examples.” Conservation groups and others interested in applying in the future are encouraged to plan in the coming months so they can apply when funds are again available. The DNR’s CPL program provides grants ranging from $5,000 to $400,000 to conservation nonprofit organizations and government to help fund projects to restore, enhance or protect fish and wildlife habitat in Minnesota. The Lessard-Sams Outdoor Heritage Council recommended the grant program, which was approved by the Minnesota Legislature and has been in place since 2009. Funding has been provided annually from the Outdoor Heritage Fund, which is part of the Clean Water, Land and Legacy Amendment and funded by a voter-approved statewide sales tax of three-eighths of 1 percent. Round one of the proposals for fiscal year 2017 included the traditional grant cycle, the metro grant cycle and the expedited grant cycle. The expedited cycle for standard types of projects is currently open for another funding round, with the maximum grant award being $50,000. Applications are due online by 4 p.m. Friday, Jan. 19. More information on the program’s grant cycles, and a complete list of the most recent grant applications and past awarded projects are on the DNR website at mndnr.gov/cpl. Discuss below - to view set the hook here.