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FullTilt

Fuel/Water Separator

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FullTilt

In talking to a local boat mechanic I was told that much of the gas we pump from the gas station has a high percentage of water in it. Usually the water does not have an affect on our cars and trucks but it can cause performance problems in boat motors. Does anyone use a water separator for their outboards to remove any water that may be in the fuel? If so, do you need two water separators if you have a kicker motor? Any input/opinions would be appreciated, I haven't had much luck searching the net.

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Knotwood

With all the "ethanol" around, I'm surprised water is a problem. Working at a gas station many years ago, pretty common knowledge was that water sits at the bottom of the storage tanks. When enough water got in (rain, condensation, delivery contamination), where it reached up to the pick-up intake for the pumps, the dealer would have to get the water pumped out. Now, the alcohol suspends the water and fuel. We still get some water/alcohol/fuel mixed in our engines and it goes through the carb jets, not much of a fuel or power factor, but technically cools the cylinder as it enters the system. If you are unsure about the amount, siphon the tank from the bottom into a clean container, the bubbles at the bottom is water, you may notice there is a pickup in the tank that does not reach all the way down to the floor of it, reason is water, if separated, will stay at the bottom. Only problem is the agitation, and it still gets in. A dealer may have a water separating filter kit available, lots of older motors had them built in, glass jar types, worked pretty good. If you need to get rid of the little bit (if any) left, use isopropyl alcohol- I usually get some from Walgreen's, the 91% stuff- an old snowmobile trick, doesn't tend to separate the oil/mix as much either. (Or freeze.)

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