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DWALLEYE

Cooking poute

15 posts in this topic

Will be fishing out of sportsmans sleepers next week and want to try cooking some poute, any one know what is good.

thanks

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boil in water, meat will turn white. some melted garlic butter and you are set. I've also had them deep fried, ok, not fantastic. Bill

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Ive always boiled them in water and they taste pretty good, never tried any other way of cooking them

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Cut backstraps out, Boil in water, dip in butter. Oh yes cant forget the beer to go with it.

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hmmm???

how about...boil in water, meat will turn white. some melted garlic butter and you are set. I've also had them deep fried, ok, not fantastic.

or maybe be...Ive always boiled them in water and they taste pretty good, never tried any other way of cooking them

one other thought is...Cut backstraps out, Boil in water, dip in butter. Oh yes cant forget the beer to go with it.

I think I have about covered the different ways to prepare..hehe!!!!

actually we add mountain dew to the water...seems to add a little sweeter taste!!!!!

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just get your water rolling pretty good before you toss the meat in. You want to cook it fast, that helps keep the meat firm, you don't want mushy pout. We often put some salt in the water.

Butter for dipping is a must, Pick up some "old bay" seasoning at the grocery store, (square can, yellow) sprinkle some of that in the boiling water before you drop the meat in. Maybe dust the cooked meat a little with the old bat before dipping. It'll compliment the shelfish texture of the pout nicely & add to the whole "poor man's lobster" effect.

Good luck, happy pout skinning!

Dave

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We've added 7-up to the boiling water.

Sifty

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Thanks for the help, now will just need to get a few.

(Got the beer already)

Don

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you know how to catch them right?

Just fish as hard as you can for.... walleye.

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when you fish lake of the woods you shouldnt have a problem catching pout.we get 5 pout every time we go up there.we got 5 in the freezer waiting to be cooked and dipped into butter.

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Dwalleye,

One tip I picked up last year when I cooked my first pout was that it will boil for 7-10 minutes and when the pieces float to the top of the water and look like they are flaky; they are done. 5 of us are heading up to the pond on Sunday so hopefully we'll get one or two as well. I haven't tried the Mt Dew or 7-up, but have heard good reviews.

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I would reccomend nailing it to a 2x4 and set it next to the campfire for about 1to 2 hours. Or until chared. Then take the fish off the 2x4 and then eat the 2x4.

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Ha ha ha ha ha ha

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does it taste as good on a green treat 2x4? ha ha

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I just tried poute for the first time this winter, and it's pretty tasty when cooked properly. It is said that poute is the poor mans lobster. I broil for about 3-4 minutes then bake in the oven (in foil with some butter inside for about 8-10 min). Looks may be deciving but when prepared properly these slimers can be quite delicious.

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