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the bobber

lack of updates, read between the lines

9 posts in this topic

i am coming up this thursday for the 19th year on winnie. i have been watching posts for several weeks to get on top of whats going on and it seems that there are fewer updates this year. i check the fishing reports not only on this forum but the resorts in the area, as well as the local guides and baitshops that post fishing reports, and most of them have not been updating regularly. what this tells me, for whatever reason, fishing hasn't been that great.

thanks to jason boser, nodak lodge and highbanks for staying current with reports, even when fishing has only been fair. i remember not too long ago when one resort that is gone now, always reported a "hot bite" even when we had just been up on his roads that weekend and nobody was catching anything. the weather has been tough this winter, and the forecast is calling for steady weather with slowly rising temps. hopefully all the fish have been waiting for us to get there to start biting. we always stay at nodak's and our loyalty to them is returned to us with their best effort to put us on active fish. special note to fellow fm'ers perchjerker and weener, i see you'll also be there the same time, maybe we should trade war stories at the lodge. we are in cabin two maroon suburban with a red/white (bobber colored) car topper on top. our hats also read "jerkperchers" across the back. we might try cutfoot or bowstring for crappies instead of url since it doesn't sound too encouraging, but it was fun while it lasted.

the bobber

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Don't be to discouraged. You never know, the bite changes very often right now. They can change every few days. I think that you have a great chance from some of the people I have talked to recently to get on some nice Jumbos and Walleyes in the evenings.

Thats why they call it fishing, you never know how the catching will go.

You will have fun am sure of that and I think that you could do fine on Winne.

If not head to Blackduck or over to Cass and give them a shot.

Good Luck!

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thanks for your response pikebaycomanche. we're certainly not discouraged. in fact, due to the stable forecast, we're anticipating the bite to be better this weekend. combine this with the endless winter storms and tough fishing there should be plenty of fish for us to find. just the ramblings of an anxious angler with 2 days to kill before we get there. over the years we've encountered every imaginable weather condition,even though we always go the same week. in '95 we had 50 degrees and shirtsleeves, the following year the high was -15 with -70 windchills. we've stood on three feet of snow on the ice, and fished when there a foot of water from melting snow on top of the ice. not knowing what to expect is half the adventure. i notice you are from ames IA. my nephew just graduated from ISU, as did my wife's sister and both my father and mother in law. if i still had someone in the area i would try your wine, but for now i'll have to stick with my two buck chuck!

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I'm hoping the weather warming up may do the trick. I'm guessing we'll be on the west side somewhere. We usually game plan the night before.

I don't know what days we'll be on Winnie, but I will stop by and say hi if I see you. I'll have my black and tan Explorer and I know who else is driving up. We stay at our hunting shack and usually take the wheelers out.

Good luck.

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We survived another strike from Mother Nature this past weekend on Sunday into Monday. It hit within a matter of minutes, strong northwesterly winds late in the afternoon on Sunday causing for white out conditions. We closed our access for the day on Monday. With this system on the forefront, the bite was slower on Saturday. The best reports were coming in from Zoomers in 22' of water. Our houses were producing some fish in shallow, but not as consistent as we had been seeing. We've been back out and reopening roads. The upcoming weekend's weather looks pleasant with temps in the mid 20's. We'll keep our fingers crossed that the barometer stabilizes with the weather!!

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I've had great luck for the past 3 years now on the north west corner of the lake. The High Banks is the closest and has the best road system out to that area. They do a great job on there road system and are very helpful Rick and Kim run a 1st class operation. I would highly recommend them to anyone. Last weekend there were 6 of us up and kept 55 perch with 75% of them being 10"+ with some 9" mixed in to make a meal for all 6 of us. I have never had trouble getting at least 1 limit of nice perch in that area. We release many 9" and under. Some times you really have to nurse them back to health to get them back down the hole. I fish deep water even when they they say the fish are moving up shallow. I also use a bobber and a minnow (fathead) from 8" to 24" off the bottom. Tried jigging, but a minnow and a bobberwith a plain colored hook has always worked best. Or mabey I just lazy. I don't think Nodak's Road system will get you up to this area but If you have a hard time catching fish out of the south end of the lake head up to High Banks Try fishing around the Zoomers area It's been a good area for me for the past few years.

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I am staying in Grand Rapids this week and was hoping to fish Winnie on Tues and Weds ...... didn't go Tues because of the temps, probably going to give it a shot for a while today.

I don't remember our cabin number but it is on the lake side of the road, just west of the access where you drive on. I have a blue F150 crew cab, will probably be pulling a grey and rust-colored trailer.

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I've been going up to Winnie 2 or 3 weekends a year for the last 12 or so years. I usually stay at a friends cabin near Longville, so go in at Nodaks. I was up the 25/26 of Jan, and 15/16 Feb. Both weekends had cold and warm fronts, not stable at all. I tried deep, shallow, and points in between, and couldn't buy a bite. I managed a few, but not even enough to make a meal. We moved shallow from 4PM to 7PM, and managed a few walleyes.

Im not sure if it was the weather or not, but I've never had luck as bad as this year. I'll probably try one more time in late March.

Gary

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Quick report - I braved the temps today and fished Winnie from noon until 4:00. Definately not prime time but I was concerned about the temps since I had my young son with me. It was a beautiful afternoon, way below zero but no wind at all. We did some fishing outside the house and saw some other guys outside on the ice as well.

I wanted 12 perch for a meal and got that easily, had several throwbacks also. I was really happy with the size, we didn't catch anything under 7-8 inches and had several that were 11" or better. Didn't keep anything smaller than 9.5" The fish I caught today on average were noticably larger than most of the fish I've seen there the last several years. Given the time of day we fished and that I had limited mobility due to the temperature and having my son with, I was pleased with our catch.

The baits we used were standard Winnie fare, small glow gem'n'eyes with fatheads on deadsticks and slip bobbers, and jigging spoons with minnow heads (glow and firetiger). 26-28 fow.

I'm looking forward to the next few days grin.gif

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  • Posts

    • HunterFisher11

      Posted

      Thanks for the info!!! Will be up there on 10/5-10/8, have been looking at the weather and I hope they are wrong because looks like rain... Have you ever tried fishing out on pike island area? Brother inlaw drove down there this summer and said there were quiet a few people fishing there.

    • Minnesota motorists can support conservation with a new critical habitat plate featuring a wild turkey.
      The new plate displays a colorful tom turkey and is the ninth critical habitat plate offered. Other plates display a moose, loon, pheasant, chickadee, showy lady’s slipper, a fishing scene and two with white-tailed deer. There is also a specialty license plate for state parks and trails.

      “Wild turkey restoration in Minnesota is one of our great conservation success stories,” said Kim Hennings, wildlife land acquisition coordinator. “The critical habitat plates are a great way for motorists to show their interest and support for Minnesota’s fish and wildlife resources.”

      Wild turkeys are native to southeastern Minnesota, but disappeared by 1880 because of habitat loss and unregulated hunting. Successful reintroduction efforts starting in the 1970s led to turkeys now living over a wide range of Minnesota.

      “The wild turkey critical habitat plate has been long awaited for by our membership in Minnesota and turkey hunting enthusiasts,” said Tom Glines, National Wild Turkey Federation regional director. “We love the wild turkey resource and want to do everything we can do to keep wild turkey populations healthy and thriving.”

      The Minnesota Legislature created the critical habitat license plate program in 1995 to provide additional opportunity for Minnesotans to contribute toward conservation. Motorists who purchase a critical habitat plate pay a $10 initial fee, plus a minimum annual contribution of $30 to the Reinvest in Minnesota (RIM) program. Every dollar generated through the sale of the license plate is matched with private donations of cash or land. The annual $30 contribution is not tax deductible.

      Critical habitat license plate revenue has generated more than $59 million to acquire or improve 22,000 acres of critical habitat and helped fund non-game wildlife research and surveys, habitat enhancement and educational programs. Information about the program and details about how to order plates are available on the DNR website at www.mndnr.gov/plates.

      The new license plates are now available at deputy registrar offices statewide. For questions about ordering critical habitat license plates, call the Department of Public Safety-Driver and Vehicle Services at 612-297-3166.

      Discuss below - to view set the hook here.

    • The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources recently honored two youths for their outstanding conservation efforts during a ceremony at the 2016 Minnesota State Fair.

      Eliza Sankovitz from Waseca in Waseca County received the 4-H award and Melissa Schilling from Frazee in Becker County received the Future Farmers of America (FFA) award.

      The DNR Commissioner’s Youth Awards are given annually to an FFA student and 4-H member who have demonstrated initiative, leadership, creativity and achievement in conservation and wise use of natural and agricultural resources. This is the 25th year of the award program.

      Curious about the quality of the water in Clear Lake, Eliza Sankovitz asked the question, “What pollutants might be entering the lake?” This was the beginning of Sankovitz’s 4-H project titled “How Clear is Clear Lake.” Sankovitz found three locations around Clear Lake and took water samples after rain events. She then tested the water samples for bacteria, nitrates, chlorine, lead and pesticides. Sankovitz said she did find some pollutants entering the lake.

      Sankovitz is the daughter of Tom and Gretchen Sankovitz.

      Schilling grew up on a farm in rural Becker County. As a member of her FFA Fish and Wildlife Management team, she placed as top individual multiple times at regional competitions. Schilling also placed first in her area and third at state in the Minnesota Senior Envirothon.

      As a member of the Youth Conservation Corps, Schilling worked at the Tamarac National Wildlife Refuge. While on the job, she assisted with prairie restoration, bird surveys, goose banding, invasive species control and refuge facility maintenance. Schilling is currently enrolled at the University of Minnesota Crookston, and is pursuing a degree in wildlife management.

      Schilling is the daughter of Charles and Regina Schilling.

      Discuss below - to view set the hook here.

    • BringAnExtension

      Posted

      11 hours ago, ZachD said:

      I am sure Johnny P is all booked up on weekends by now and for some reason some of the guys don't like sleeper houses all though I may push for it this year last year was such a hassle packing everything up for the night loading the trucks having to bring sleds and wheelers. I much rather bring my flasher couple rods and lots of beer. I go fishing enough running and gunning its nice to have a break where you just show up and fish.

      Yes, he probably is.  I book with him early.  I think that he offers guide service in December up until he opens the sleepers up.  Might align with your portables.

    • I was on Namakan yesterday and kept 4 eyes 14" to 15" caught in under 20' of water. Water temp is 60. I was rigging with a half crawler. However, I had friends out using jigs and minnows in 40+ ft and they did well. He said he found a school and using his I Pilot just hovered over the top of them. So it seems the fish are scattered and all methods are working.

      1 person likes this
    • monstermoose78

      Posted

      I hope this weekend is better than last!!  I know there is a  lot of ducks around but they have so many places to hide.

    • If you want to stay away from the crowd I would suggest Beacon Harbor I think after jan 1st they don't allow day passes its only beacon harbor and outdoor authority who have houses there. Then they allow only a limited amount of yearly passes.

      Now they don't have all the bells and whistles like a bar and food ect but John and Ann are some of the nicest people you will ever meet. Not to mention I personally think it is some of the best.

       

      Now if you needed a bar and food and all that my choices would be Rogers or Westwind

    • fins_n'_feathers

      Posted

      Today was the complete opposite of yesterday. The current coming out of light house gap made a pocket of clear water out in the lake overnight, fished right on the edge of the muddy water in 14 feet of water and went through 3 bags of frozen shiners and caught a bunch on plastics after the minnows were gone. Nothing fantastic for size, only 3 in the slot but nice limits of 14-17 inchers and a ton of smaller fish. Once that muddy water gets blown out or clears up the bite is going to be crazy good!

      1 person likes this
    • eyeguy 54

      Posted

      212 wondering the same thing maybe?? ;)   

       

    • Agronomist_at_IA

      Posted



  • Posts

    • HunterFisher11
      Thanks for the info!!! Will be up there on 10/5-10/8, have been looking at the weather and I hope they are wrong because looks like rain... Have you ever tried fishing out on pike island area? Brother inlaw drove down there this summer and said there were quiet a few people fishing there.
    • Rick
      Minnesota motorists can support conservation with a new critical habitat plate featuring a wild turkey.
      The new plate displays a colorful tom turkey and is the ninth critical habitat plate offered. Other plates display a moose, loon, pheasant, chickadee, showy lady’s slipper, a fishing scene and two with white-tailed deer. There is also a specialty license plate for state parks and trails. “Wild turkey restoration in Minnesota is one of our great conservation success stories,” said Kim Hennings, wildlife land acquisition coordinator. “The critical habitat plates are a great way for motorists to show their interest and support for Minnesota’s fish and wildlife resources.” Wild turkeys are native to southeastern Minnesota, but disappeared by 1880 because of habitat loss and unregulated hunting. Successful reintroduction efforts starting in the 1970s led to turkeys now living over a wide range of Minnesota. “The wild turkey critical habitat plate has been long awaited for by our membership in Minnesota and turkey hunting enthusiasts,” said Tom Glines, National Wild Turkey Federation regional director. “We love the wild turkey resource and want to do everything we can do to keep wild turkey populations healthy and thriving.” The Minnesota Legislature created the critical habitat license plate program in 1995 to provide additional opportunity for Minnesotans to contribute toward conservation. Motorists who purchase a critical habitat plate pay a $10 initial fee, plus a minimum annual contribution of $30 to the Reinvest in Minnesota (RIM) program. Every dollar generated through the sale of the license plate is matched with private donations of cash or land. The annual $30 contribution is not tax deductible. Critical habitat license plate revenue has generated more than $59 million to acquire or improve 22,000 acres of critical habitat and helped fund non-game wildlife research and surveys, habitat enhancement and educational programs. Information about the program and details about how to order plates are available on the DNR website at www.mndnr.gov/plates. The new license plates are now available at deputy registrar offices statewide. For questions about ordering critical habitat license plates, call the Department of Public Safety-Driver and Vehicle Services at 612-297-3166. Discuss below - to view set the hook here.
    • Rick
      The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources recently honored two youths for their outstanding conservation efforts during a ceremony at the 2016 Minnesota State Fair. Eliza Sankovitz from Waseca in Waseca County received the 4-H award and Melissa Schilling from Frazee in Becker County received the Future Farmers of America (FFA) award. The DNR Commissioner’s Youth Awards are given annually to an FFA student and 4-H member who have demonstrated initiative, leadership, creativity and achievement in conservation and wise use of natural and agricultural resources. This is the 25th year of the award program. Curious about the quality of the water in Clear Lake, Eliza Sankovitz asked the question, “What pollutants might be entering the lake?” This was the beginning of Sankovitz’s 4-H project titled “How Clear is Clear Lake.” Sankovitz found three locations around Clear Lake and took water samples after rain events. She then tested the water samples for bacteria, nitrates, chlorine, lead and pesticides. Sankovitz said she did find some pollutants entering the lake. Sankovitz is the daughter of Tom and Gretchen Sankovitz. Schilling grew up on a farm in rural Becker County. As a member of her FFA Fish and Wildlife Management team, she placed as top individual multiple times at regional competitions. Schilling also placed first in her area and third at state in the Minnesota Senior Envirothon. As a member of the Youth Conservation Corps, Schilling worked at the Tamarac National Wildlife Refuge. While on the job, she assisted with prairie restoration, bird surveys, goose banding, invasive species control and refuge facility maintenance. Schilling is currently enrolled at the University of Minnesota Crookston, and is pursuing a degree in wildlife management. Schilling is the daughter of Charles and Regina Schilling. Discuss below - to view set the hook here.
    • BringAnExtension
      Yes, he probably is.  I book with him early.  I think that he offers guide service in December up until he opens the sleepers up.  Might align with your portables.
    • Dusty
      I was on Namakan yesterday and kept 4 eyes 14" to 15" caught in under 20' of water. Water temp is 60. I was rigging with a half crawler. However, I had friends out using jigs and minnows in 40+ ft and they did well. He said he found a school and using his I Pilot just hovered over the top of them. So it seems the fish are scattered and all methods are working.