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goggy eyes

tullibee

15 posts in this topic

Where the heck do you find tullibee. Any idea's.

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I caught 1 on round this year, my first and only. sorry not much help.

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If you live in crosby I hear that a lake in trommald is loaded with them so I would try the deep water out there to start out. Let me know if you try and how you do I have been wanting to try that lake. Other than that try some deep spots on the big lakes. I hear we can't say the name of small lake otherwise I have a good one west of brainerd.

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Maddowg are you talking about black bear. I use to spear out there and would occasional see a couple but never very many.

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gull (popes flat drop off), look how many where caught durring the contest.

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yeah, it is suppose to be good but i have never made it out there. I was going to try my luck in march to see what i could get. The DNR site showed some good numbers for that lake.

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I heard there have been good size die offs in lakes over the past two years do to the water warming up to high in the summer. We used to fish them on Mille lacs and catch them all day long now your lucky if you get one a year.

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thats what i have been hearing too. I know the lake I fish west of brainerd has been netted at least once to stock shamineau so the number in there is way down compared to what the DNR site says. last year it was hit or miss out there but we always caught at least 4 or 5 with some of the best days being around 30 or 40.

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I remember going up to leech and catching hundreds of fish a day.Not no more thanks to those dam cormarants.But the lake is recovering real nicely.

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I've never had a chance to try the Leech tullibee bite but I have heard alot about it. I only started fishing them 2yrs ago out of bored and have been hooked since. Maybe leech will have a good bite in march this year so I can go try that. 100 or more a day, I would be wore out by the end of the day but is sounds like a blast. Any hints on setup, I use a spoon for flash with a 12in drop line and a small jig tipped with a wax worm?

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goggy eyes, come on, I hope your kidding or trying to stir the pot a little...

Cormorants ate all the Tullis, huh?

I suppose they'll get blamed for cleaning out 50" muskies next. I'd venture to guess that the basin East of Stony Point on Leech where most of us have caught them in the "old" days is just a little too shallow with all the warm summers we've been having and since they are a cold water species, lakes w/ shallower water like parts of Leech or Mille Lakes will always have fluctuating populations in warm years.

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If you do a little checking you will see that leech lake was hit really hardby the birds.I read articles about the dnr shooting large quanities of the birds. It didn't just hurt the tullibees the walleyes were the hardest hit.I think the water would have to drop a long ways to kill or move fish. Just my thoughts.

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I live on Gull Lake and we had a pretty good die off each of the last two years.. Seems like the larger fish did not make it. Most of the dead fish floating were fairly large.

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Any one willing to give a tullibee report? think of trying my luck sunday if it warms up like they say.

thanks

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tullies !! what a fish and fun to catch ! yes in the hay day ofthe late 90,s were just that a feeding frenzy with no end ! we did take our share from stonie point then ,could be part of the reason for the laps os fish not being there ? and yes the heat waves we have had along with the black commerants did not help ! there was also a report from the dnr at the time the commerants were being thined out around 1999 thru 2002 of a worm that caused a die off , they were to be infected with them in their gills that killed them off . if you were a diehard tullie fisherman you probably remember this . with all the reasons for theie demise you cant forget about the one that was reported to be from the great minnesote big toothed shark the " MUSKIE " helped to thin them out ? so take your pick as to why they were far and few between ? they will be back and when they do ? the bite will be on again ! djwood fish on and oftyen !

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