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grousehunter

color vs. b/w fish finder

22 posts in this topic

What are some of the advantages to having a color fish finder versus using a b/w fish finder? I have been looking at the hummingbird 737 and was wondering if color would really be worth all the extra money. Limited on funds, but if color makes it alot easier to tell different structure/rock from tree from sand etc or to see fish easier it might be worth it. I guess im just looking for opinion from people who have experience with both. Thanks,

Blake

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Just posted this in the open water forum, but saw this would probably be a better place for it.

What are some of the advantages to having a color fish finder versus using a b/w fish finder? I have been looking at the hummingbird 737 and was wondering if color would really be worth all the extra money. Limited on funds, but if color makes it alot easier to tell different structure/rock from tree from sand etc or to see fish easier it might be worth it. I guess im just looking for opinion from people who have experience with both. Thanks,

Blake

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I'm also looking for a new locator this spring and like you I only have so much money I can spend. I'm leaning toward black and white because I can get a higher defination screen and a few extra features versus a color version for the same money. I think its more important to have a higher defination screen especially for walleye fishing when the fish are hugging the bottom. I wish I had an unlimited budget because I sure like how the HD color models look.

Nels

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Color is the way to go. Much easier to spot bottom hugging eyes - they are a very different color than the bottom not a slightly different shade of gray. ALso much more visible screen night or day. The pixel counts on the color units are at least equal to or better than BW so defination is actually better on the color graphs. I made the switch 2 years ago and haven't regretted it. In fact, I will never go back to B/W. Worth the $$$ IMO.

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I agree, color makes a big difference.

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I have noticed with my H20C gps that it is easier to distinguish between break lines with the color vs. B&W.

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I bought a color unit two years ago with the gps and mapping, and would never go back to b/w. In fact I got another one for the bow of my boat. Spend the extra money for color.

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Go for the color. I tested the Humminbird 737 and 777c2 over 5 days of fishing two summers ago. I alternated units each day. The color unit was used the extra day, because it was better and that's the one I kept. It is easier to see color changes than varying shades of gray. You won't regret getting the color. I suggest getting the Quad Beam transducer if you go with one of these.

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The color is worth every penny. One of the best advantages' it holds is the abilit to easily distinguish the difference between bottom types. With a black and white it can be tuff because all it will show is a different shade of grey but with a color unit the transition will show up as an entirely different color.

Go color and you won't go back.

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think he is talking about fish finders not gps's.as for fish finders i would say the coler 1 is way to.lot easier to tell what is what.instead of the black & white

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I agree, go color. The colors do a better job of showing hard or soft bottoms, weeds, big fish or small fish, fish in the weeds, fish on the bottom, bait, bugs, etc. It makes a huge difference.

Another advantage to color is you can get by with lower screen resolution if you have too. I'd recommend getting the most resolution (pixel count) you can either way, but color is just that much better at showing you what's down there.

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I have a 334c lowrance graph/gps. I had a b/w one before and can honestly say color is the only way to go..You can see contour and my track better than the b/w. Spend the extra money, you will be glad you did.

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Was definatly going to get the quad-beam. That is the main reason im looking at them. Seems everyone likes color a lot more. I just need to convince myself its worth an extra 150 dollars i guess.....but then eventually i wanted to buy the gps add on, lol fishing stuff is too expensive when you want all the fancy features.

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If you have the money to spare for the color that is the only way to go!

Much easier to see, shows bottom type changes much better, shows fish better. Just a much better way to go as far as I am concerned.

I had b&w for years and switched to color and cannot believe the difference!

Cliff

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I love my color unit. It is so much easier to see the difference between the stong and weak signals. I like the dark blue background, which really helps anything the unit sees to stand out like a sore thumb.

Color all the way, plus they aren't that much more $ these days.

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One more vote for color. World of difference.

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I have another question for everyone that recommeded color. If you had to choose between having the quadrabeam option from humminbird, which will enable me to see both sides of the boat as well as under(90 degrees), or a color unit with just single under the boat beam/transducer what would you choose and why? The more i look at it i dont think i can afford the color with quadrabeam and really wanted that option but if color will make that much of a difference it might be better to go with color without that option. thanks,

Blake

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I tried the 737 (black and white) and the 777c2 (color) units with the Quadra Beam. Both of these have 640 vertical pixels. I would recommend the color unit without the Quadra Beam if you can't afford both. The color is that much better.

Check out Nu Gadgets dot com for their price. Maybe you can get both.

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I agree, color is the way to go.

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OK, now that I woke up and read all the recent posts about color fish finders I have another question. I have always had good luck with my Lowrance procucts. How do Lowrance color graphs stack up against Garmin or other the others?

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I would get a Humminbird. Several of their graphs have 640 vetical pixels and I believe but haven't proven it, better target separation than Lowrance. On the 737 (black and white one that I tried) and the 777c2 (the color one that I kept) I can see two 1/4 oz. jigs tied 3 inches apart in 30 feet. If your thinking of a sonar/gps, Lowrance units can use Lakemaster and Navionics while Humminbird can't use Lakemaster.

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I have and love my lowrance. I have used humminbirds too, but I do think the algorithms that Lowrance uses to display the sonar returns are more accurate than what I have seen using a humminbird.

Not so sure on the Garmins though, I have never used one.

All will meet your needs, I think Lowrance supports the widest variety of GPS chips, find the best value and decide what you really want, and set your budget. Like buying a new PC, get the best one you can afford.

Brand Loyalty is realatively worthless with these products.

I have the Lowrance 334c, and I love it. it is a really great unit.

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