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TN Rick

Rainy Veterans Advise

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TN Rick    0
TN Rick

I need to begin by offering a brief apoogy for posting this here as opposed to the equipment forum. I thought that maybe since everyone here fished Rainy I might get more useful input.

I am looking at buying a new net before our trip this year (4th one) to LaBelle's and was wondering if anyone could offer their views on what might be the best net for use here. As a Southern Bass Angler our requirements are much different. In previous years fishing of fishing Rainy I have spent way too much time trying to untangle treble hooks from netting after boating a Pike. Took awhile to learn that you don't want to lay them on the deck in the net. They seem to like rolling and tangling everything.

Anyway . . . any suggestions would be appreciated. Size, Material, etc.

Looking foward to this summer!

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Rainydaze    0
Rainydaze

Hi TN Rick,

I'm sure there are several opinions here, but I'll give you mine. In my guide boat I use the rubber mesh netting in an extendable handle. I prefer the rubber nets to eliminate the super tangles and killing fish. I like the extended handle when I'm trolling to net a few more fish that may shake off. I would say the downfall of these nets would be the added weight. It is tough to operate when netting your own fish. Seems every couple years depending on usage you will likely be replacing the netting also.

RD

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JCR    0
JCR

I like the rubber mesh nets also. Much less time lost untangling treble hooks. They are great for Eye's and bass, but you have to be aggressive with your "scoop" to get a big northern down in the net, and avoid it flopping out on you. Maybe my net isn't deep enough. I don't have a problem, but sometimes one of my guests,who is not accustomed to doing it, does.

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okfisherman    0
okfisherman

We tried the rubber nets and loved them except the big pike were hard for us to get in as well. Maybe it's a lack of practice thing. Last 3 years we have been useing the coated mesh nets with much less hook trouble than just regular netting.

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Rainydaze    0
Rainydaze

We just harpoon those big pike, and seem to eliminate all net trouble. Just Kidding! Yes I agree that most of the rubber nets are designed for walleyes, and tend to be a bit on the shallow end when it comes to the big gators. Last year my dad was up and hooked a 45 inch pike after 2 tries with the net we just laughed at each other! Like trying to net with a minnow scoop. Later I was fortunate enough to be able to get him in by hand for a quick snap shot. For the record I plan on carrying a cradle for the big pike this year. Arguably the best way to catch, photo, measure and release these monsters!

RD

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uffdapete    3
uffdapete

Though I've never used one I would think a cradle would be the best way to handle pike. Could it be that hard to make one? Finding the right kind of material might be the challenge. I did net a 46.5" muskie with folding net 3 years ago. The kind where the hoop tucks into the handle. Talk about being under equipped!

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Nordy    0
Nordy

Hey Uffda good idea. Find 2 old hockey sticks for handles. The netting you could use old hockey goal netting? That might be hard to find. How about weed barrier that people use to keep weeds out of their gardens, water goes threw it. If water goes threw it to slow cuts some holes in it.

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okfisherman    0
okfisherman

Buy a cradle net, do not attempt to build one, trust me. We have one guy who comes with us every year, a gov't engineer, thought he would build a better mouse trap so to speak, after losing several fish the first year he took it along, he "improved" it for the next year. We refused to let him go again if he brought "the net". Our group vowed if his contraption ever made it back up there, the fish would have our technology as bottom funiture.

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TN Rick    0
TN Rick

I appreciate all the input.

Think I'll try to find a good coated mesh net with a telescoping handle. Possibly the best of both worlds that way. Had thought about a cradle as seen in several videos but decided against it. Not much room to store a 48 inch cradle and a net on a bass boat, and not much use for the cradle fishing at home.

Have actually gotten pretty good over the past few years at picking Pike up under the gilplate (sp). Cut a few fingers in the learning but not bad now. Learned real qucik NOT to "lip" them like a bass!

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Rainydaze    0
Rainydaze

Hi TN Rick,

My sister learned the hard way lipping a 7 lb Walleye last year. She had stayed overnight in my Permanent shack. I went out to meet them in the a.m.. She had her hands all bandaged up, and when I asked her what the **** happened. She replied "So about 15 minutes ago we had this huge walleye splashing around in the hole, and we were yelling what should we do. I said I don't know my brother always grabs them. Needless to say she attempted to lip the big walleye, and did manage to extract the big fish from the hole, but also left a nice blood trail. Make no mistake about it if you continue to bring aboard these big pike you will shed some blood, and I don't care who you are. Right Fishmeister!

RD

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fishmeister_86    0
fishmeister_86

HEY R.D.,

I NEW SOONER OR LATER THE STORY WOULD HIT THE F.M. WIRE, SO HERE GOES, FISHING MONDAY AFTER WORK, I DECIDED TO FISH A LITTLE SHALLOWER...AS I HAD BEEN FISHING AROUND 40 FEET. FIGURED BEFORE DARK I MIGHT PICK UP A FEW WALLEYES MOVING IN TO FEED. I STARTED FISHING ABOUT 4 PM, ABOUT 15 MINUTES LATER I SAW A MARK ABOUT 4 FEET OFF THE BOTTOM, SLOWLY REELED ABOVE IT AND BAM., FIGURED IT WAS A WALLEYE FEEDING ON SMELT, AFTER PLAYING IT ABOUT 5 MINUTES I THOUGHT MOST LIKELY A NORTHERN, AFTER ABOUT 15 MINUTES I SEE THE BIG GATOR. AFTER TRYING ABOUT 8 TIMES TO GET IT TO GO THRU THE 10" HOLE, I FINALLY GET IT THRU THE HOLE, I REACH DOWN AND GENTLY GRAB UNDER THE GILL PLATE & PULL HIM OUT, WELL SHE GOES CRAZY AND TURNED MY WRIST IN POSITIONS ITS NEVER BEEN, NOT REALLY BOTHERING ME UNTIL ABOUT 2 AM IN BED, IT FELT LIKE IT WAS BROKEN....I GO GET SOME PAIN MEDS, TUESDAY... I GO TO WORK IN BIGTIME PAIN. I END UP GOING TO THE CLINIC & GET SOME X-RAYS, NOTHING BROKE...BUT PULLED TENDONS. MORAL OF THE STORY...DON'T WRESTLE THE BIG GATORS.

FISH WAS 39". ALSO 1-16.75" WALLEYE.

SINCERELY,

FISHMEISTER

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okfisherman    0
okfisherman

We started using the silicone coated gloves last year, and it does allow us to just pick up a lot of fish.

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Rainydaze    0
Rainydaze

Hey FM,

Hope your alright buddy! I bet some of those Hardee's bacon chedder fries which are flat out awesome will help the healing process!

Good Fishing!

RD

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TipupSprinter    0
TipupSprinter

I wouldn't want to be injured any other way.

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CaptJohnWI    0
CaptJohnWI

I used a rubber net for a few years on Rainy. Very heavy and not deep enough for big fish. Very easy to get crankbaits untangled though.

I now use a Beckman with coated nylon (I think). Much better for netting big fish and almost as easy as the rubber ones for untangling hooks.

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TN Rick    0
TN Rick

Thanks again to everyone. I may try a net with coated material. Seems to be a good middle ground.

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