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MikeH55343

Transducer Cone Angles?

11 posts in this topic

Somewhere I saw a diagram showing the bottom coverage of various transducer angles at different depths. Anyone know where this diagram is located or have this information. Thanks

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Do a search of the forams, it was dicussed in the ice fishing one last year.

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Vexilar has it in the owners manuals of each FL-flasher product.

might find it on line at their web site.

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Does anyone know off hand what the title of the post was. I'd be interested in seeing that too.

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Vexilar's webpage has a chart in their articles section that lists how big of a viewing area you get at different depths with different cone angles.

The tech people at Lowrance told me a simple formula that let you calculate how much of the bottom you'd see, given the depth and a standard 20 degree transducer. Unfortunately I don't remember the formula or I'd post it here.

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a typical 19 deg transducer is aprox 4" for every foot drop

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For a 19-20 degree the cone angle is approximately 1/3 the depth, for a 9 degree its 1/6 the depth.

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Thanks Crappie Todd. The chart was on the Vex web site located in their online PDF owner manuals.

For the 12 degree transducer, the bottom coverage is 2.2' at 10' FOW, 4.3' at 20' FOW, 6.3' at 30' FOW.

The 9 degree transducer reduces the coverage by 6", 12", and 18" at the same depths.

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cone diameter = 2 x depth x tangent(cone angle/2)

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Also sonar is about sound reflection and it doesn't always mean it's geometrically shaped. I think that has something to do with a fish out towards the side that's probably leveled with a lure but will look like it's a foot below the lure. When it comes close it looks as if it rises up to the lure as the signal gets stronger and it becomes more solid. That's why often time's the biggest fish I catch is often a very small signal on the flasher. It's out towards the side and strikes very fast. While the big red bar that just hovers on the lure, typically has been a mediocre small fish.

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