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big musk411

Catfish Spearing?

11 posts in this topic

A guy I know says he has been spearing Catfish on the upper Mississippi. He BS's A LOT so I don't know if it is for real. I also question the legality because there are also muskies roming the same waters. I have had cats chase small bass like a northern would in open water so it seems possible. Has anyone done this? It sounds like fun!

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I'm about 99.9% certain it would be illegal. As far as I know the only fish you can spear are pike and rough fish. Cats are considered game fish in MN.

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Well, I'll be darned! Good catch. I've never seen that before. Has it always been allowed or is it fairly new? Good thing I didn't say 100%

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yeah, I just don't get that.

It's a proven fact that flatheads pretty much go dormant in the cold water, so they are sitting ducks.

Not only that, but why would someone want to spear a cat, when they can stick a big northern. ;\)

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we had catfish planted in the horseshoe chain were i live an i heard that cats take a toll on panfish. i spear a lot and would not take a cat cause i dont eat them so i leave them for people who do.

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 Originally Posted By: dtro
yeah, I just don't get that.

It's a proven fact that flatheads pretty much go dormant in the cold water, so they are sitting ducks.

Not only that, but why would someone want to spear a cat, when they can stick a big northern. ;\)

Sitting ducks if you cut your hole in the right place (and don't scare them away while cutting it) grin.gif

I would think it would be harder to spear a dormant fish rather than a fish that moves since the fish that moves has a larger chance of moving to your hole.

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i would have to agree with you. I have never done this, but im sure it would be cool.

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 Originally Posted By: merkman
 Originally Posted By: dtro
yeah, I just don't get that.

It's a proven fact that flatheads pretty much go dormant in the cold water, so they are sitting ducks.

Not only that, but why would someone want to spear a cat, when they can stick a big northern. ;\)

Sitting ducks if you cut your hole in the right place (and don't scare them away while cutting it) grin.gif

I would think it would be harder to spear a dormant fish rather than a fish that moves since the fish that moves has a larger chance of moving to your hole.

You are right, but, if and when, that wintering hole is found, everyone and his brother could chop a hole and throw darts. As for scaring them……..from what I’ve read, they are in a hibernation state, so there is a good chance they won’t be scared.

On the flip side they normally winter in deep holes so the chance of taking advantage of them is slim.

Must be better targets out there I would think.

On a side note, there once was a 153 Flatty speared on the MN river near Henderson, in fact it held the record for a while until it was discovered that it had been speared.

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 Originally Posted By: dtro
You are right, but, if and when, that wintering hole is found, everyone and his brother could chop a hole and throw darts. As for scaring them……..from what I’ve read, they are in a hibernation state, so there is a good chance they won’t be scared.

Well you don't have much to worry about from me.

I buy my catfish at Wal-Mart. grin.gif

Farm raised, grain fed, cleaned, and ready to cook. mmmmmmmm

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yummy grin.gif

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