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delzz7

need calling advice

5 posts in this topic

In the past, I have heard coyotes in the distance yipping on the way out to the set. I have tried to do a distress call to call them in, but haven't had any luck.

I walk out as quiet as possible!

Wandering what to do in this situation for calling? Howl?

How long do you do a distress call? How much time between callings?

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I you haven't started out with a howl, I would try that...I would also try sitting in a different spot and trying a different distress call. maybe even try a hurt pup kiyi after you howl, Keep after them, make sure you don't skyline yourself, mind the wind also.

Try something different, park further away, use a cover scent.......I think these coyotes know your call and what it sounds like. Remember to start out quietly, call for 10-20 seconds and then be quiet for about 3-5 minutes and start it again, keep that up for about 30 minutes and see what happens. Don't do a thing for the first 5-10 minutes. But Try starting out with a howl.....

I know there are others here that can help out as well, good luck

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Quote:

In the past, I have heard coyotes in the distance yipping on the way out to the set. I have tried to do a distress call to call them in, but haven't had any luck.

I walk out as quiet as possible!

Wandering what to do in this situation for calling? Howl?

How long do you do a distress call? How much time between callings?


I'm certainly no expert here, however I'll take a stab at this. I'll assume you're paying attention to the wind and getting into position as quietly as possible...

I think I'd go for more of a locating/greeting call in the beginning. Tell them "you" are there and new to the neighborhood. Just to get their attention. From what I've seen, yotes can be very territorial and will come to "greet" any new arrivals in their domain. See if you can get a response. If they respond or continue to yip, you're still well in the game. It not, don't worry. All is not lost.

Now if this call you're using is a rabbit or other prey distress call... I'd start this after a locater/greeting and at low volume being a bit sporatic. Call for a few seconds and then wait. Then increase your volume and call again. This time a bit longer in duration. I'd keep this routine up until I'm causing quite a ruckus and thought Mr. Bunny had bit the dust. By then, the set is usually over and it's time to move on...

In some areas, the yotes become "educated" from hunters just dropping in and blasting away on their calling. In fact, there are areas that the rabbit distress is almost like hoisting a red flag to them. I try my best to mimic what I think the course of nature would be. Change things up. Keep them guessing. They're already smarter than I am... No reason to give them any more schooling.

Please keep in mind, every set is going to be different. Sometimes just a whisper will do the trick. Other times you'll have to throw everything you have at them. It can and will be frustrating. However, when everything comes together it makes it all worth while. wink.gif

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I haven't called one in yet with the distress, both tonight came in to howls. Get good with the howler, and be patient, they either come in a hurry or it takes abit. I suggest getting a good predator movie and learn the howls, it has made a big difference in my success. I somtimes start with a long lonesome howl, wait 5min, start some distress, howl a little and wait, kinda repeat it, and if you are howling, stay 30-45min, they come from a long ways sometimes and they need time. Most often the don't howl back either. Good luck.

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Thanks for all the advise I appreciated it!

I have watched a video and read numerous magazine articles to try and figure them out.

I will definitely try your tactics

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