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Slow Jigger

adjusting bow poundage question

12 posts in this topic

I am thinking of dropping my weight on my bow next year from the ~70 it is at down to more the 60-65# range. The range for the draw weight is 60-70#. I do not want to bottom it out by any means. My wife would kille me if I said I need a new bow AGAIN!!!

My question is if I drop this by letting off the limb bolts is there long term issues to be concerned with the limbs or riser? I can pull and hold the top weight fairly easy but I am starting to wonder if my shoulder is being affected (slight aches) or if my body is paying me back for all those years I have beat on it. I refuse to say I am getting old, NOT yet anyways!!

I have a newer bow that has a rotating pocket(??) so not sure if this takes this concern away or minimizes it?

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The bow was designed to operate at any draw weight in its range. Loosening and tightening the limb bolts is how this is accomplished. You will of course have to re-sight in your bow.

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As long as you stay within the suggested weight range by the bow maker you should have no problems at all... The only ill effect you may notice is slightly more noise.

As stated above you will need to re-sight, and you may or may not need new arrows to be properly spined to your new draw weight.

I shoot 56 lbs... and am only 36... and feel old enough as it is.. LOL

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Common practice. Just turn your limb bolts counter-clockwise a full turn or 2. You'll usually get 2-4 lbs per turn depending on which bow you have. Just make sure to turn both bolts equally. Turn one a full turn. Flip the bow over and do a full turn on the other limb. Pull it back and see how it feels, if too heavy repeat the cycle. A lot of times the 5# in draw weight won't even affect your pins. I always crank mine down a turn or two come late-season and shot a few arrows out to 40 and they flew the same as before. Have fun.

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If you really find you'd like to shoot closer to the 60lb range you can usually buy new limbs instead of buying a new bow. Typically you can order new limbs for the 50-60lb pull and re sell your stronger limbs. Your bow is most efficient when it is cranked all the way up. If you find you like being in the 60-62lb range you might be better served by getting lighter limbs and having them cranked all the way up.

I also turn my bow down for late-season deer and spring turkeys.

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I had this problem 2 years ago with my shoulder getting bad. I sold my 60 to 70 pound hunting and target bows on ebay and bought 2 with 50 to 60 pound limbs. now I shoot about 53 instead of 63 and it only cost me a few bucks. They still hit the x and kill deer grin.gif

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Thanks guys!

I am going to wait until January to drop the weight since I am stll trying to drop a deer but New years day morning I will be in the basement flinging some feathered sticks at my target.

I am 99.9% sure my next bow will be the 50-60 range which this one probably should have been....

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don't worry about turning it down that's a myth about a bow being most efficient at full poundage. That's why the manufacturs have 10 lb. ranges an the limbs!

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I'm not sure what you're saying is a myth. The bow will be quieter and has less vibration when its turned all the way up. That is exactly why companies use 10lb ranges on their limbs rather than the 15-20lb ranges they used to. This way you can narrow down your preferred weight range and get the most potential out of your bow.

No its not a big deal if you shoot mid-range of your limbs like 65lbs, but if you're trying to shoot 60-62 on 60-70 limbs, you would be better off with the 50-60 limbs and turning them all the way up.

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I would agree with Powerstroke. From what I have always been told, a bow will shoot at its peak performance when it is set to the top poundage.

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I'm not gonna pretend to know the technicalities involved, but every time I check out bow specs or see them in a magazine, there are notes about kinetic energy and efficiency. The higher the limbs are cranked the more productive the bow is. I do know that when they are cranked all the way up there is more stored (kinetic) energy.

How else would you explain more power coming from a 70lb draw than a 60lb draw on the same bow and same limbs?

Its not a matter of right or wrong, I just think its good info to know when deciding what limbs you'd like. If you're on the borderline of a certain draw weight, the proshop you buy from should help you understand these concepts and make sure you get the more efficient bow for you.

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come listen to all of my bows that are turned down, there won't be any diffence in sound or vibration in any of them. you would see a little more speed out of a bow that's maxed compared to one that's turned down 10lbs. but to the same poundage, but not much. It might be true for Mathews bows(that's what they preach) but it sure isn't true for bowtechs. (and i have 4 of them)that's why I say it's more of a myth than factual. not trying to stir the pot but it's from experience!

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