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BobT

Rooster population

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BobT    104
BobT

Yesterday we were discussing the number of birds around our area and it was noted that around my place roosters seem to outnumber hens by a rather significant margin. I know we've taken at least 11 roosters off my 80 acres this fall but this past Monday, I saw well over 30 birds scattered across the neighbor's 80 (across the road from me) as I drove by on my way home from work. Just glancing out there I counted at least 10 roosters from those I could quickly identify.

Anyway, one of my neighbors suggested that some of them should be harvested because having an over-abundance of roosters in an area could actually have a negative impact on next year's bird population. He suggested that they would drive the hens away from food sources.

Is there any truth to this?

Bob

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Eric Wettschreck    0
Eric Wettschreck

Quote:

Is there any truth to this?


No. It's a wives tale.

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sdstatekid    0
sdstatekid

With the number of birds you are talking there shouldn't be a problem. My professor said there can be problems once the population gets up over 100 birds per section and we have a bad Winter.

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Norsky    1
Norsky

Actually, there's a fair amount of truth to that. If there's only enough habitat to support 50 pheasants on one given piece of property, would you rather have 30 roosters and 20 hens survive through the winter, or have 40 hens and 10 roosters survive through the winter. If each hen produces 5 offspring, on average, you'll have 100 of the next generation in the first scenario, or 200 offspring in the second scenario. This is the whole basis behind harvesting roosters-it doesn't affect the population much since pheasants are not monogamous. It is far better to have population numbers that reflect the available amount of habitat. It's all about HABITAT, HABITAT, HABITAT.

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tcsprtsmn    0
tcsprtsmn

Yes, it is all about the habitat.

Though, I have personally witnessed a rooster spurring away hens from a grain pile in the winter.

mnsprtsm

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Eric Wettschreck    0
Eric Wettschreck

The amount of birds Bob refers to, 30 birds with 10 being roosters, in an area about 80 acres or so, isn't anywhere near a number to worry about.

If you want to go shoot all the roosters, have a good time. Seasons still open!!!

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brittman    0
brittman

100 Birds per section is 12.5 birds per 80 acres. Maybe there is something to worry about.

What it is saying is there is plenty of opportunity to harvest more roosters before the end of the season.

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gonefishin11    0
gonefishin11

I wouldn't bother overanalyzing the situation when there are roosters to hunt. Take care of them. When it comes to breeding in the spring, the roosters will find the hens and the one or two that don't get shot will thank you grin.gif.

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09ultra    0
09ultra

Good points here,It doesn't take but only a few roosters to service a whole bunch of hens.The DNR has a 51 page article on their website pertaining to pheasants,very good information.Good Hunting!!!!!

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settersit    0
settersit

Gone fishing and dodgeman got it right, a few roosters, alotta hens, and good habitat will insure a good spring for the birds and a really good fall for the hunters. As long as you have hens and good habitat through-out the year, including winter, you'll have no problems whatsoever.

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grab the net    0
grab the net

Bob if you need help thinning them out, me and Duey are available on short notice. smile.gif

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kobear    0
kobear

I hear 11+ hens per rooster is about right. Ever see the spurs on a hen? They don't have any. The roosters do hog the best food sources just like with deer.

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dogs    0
dogs

As said before 1 rooster can service a lot of hens. When watching pheasants in the winter they will drive hens away from areas were the wind has blown a bare spot in a field. but then again the hens don't like to be crowded either. The problem I have noticed is that to many roosters and they don't let the hens rest. They will pick and pick at them until they are all bloodied in the rear, this is very common in pen birds, but it does happen in wild birds.

shoot the roosters.

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vister    0
vister

shoot the turkeys, if you have any. they are nasty on a pheasant population, as come springtime, so does pheasant eggs. turkeys love pheasant eggs as much as coons and skunks. however, a hen will lay clutches of eggs until a clutch hatches. then she is done till next spring. anyways, shoot the roosters, they don't lay the eggs. lets just say if i was a rooster, or a buck, the female servicing that would be taking place, or at least trying to take place! grin.gif so i am sure there will always be a few roosters around to satisfy us hunters.

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