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LwnmwnMan2

Stripping............................... wallpaper

6 posts in this topic

Wife's got on the do-list to tear off the wallpaper in the foyer.

Last room of the house that had wallpaper from when the parents lived here, so we're almost there.

Anyways, I've got the steamer, and that's getting 90% of the stuff that just didn't pull down (partial already falling down before we started) but I've got some areas about 6-12" in diameter where the glue must have been overly thick, for whatever reason.

I can tell because it's "rubbery" when you try to peel it off, instead of the rest, just wet paper.

Any hints on getting these patches of glue off??

If not, I guess it'll be time for the saws-all... laugh.gif

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2 products.

1) Little handroller thing with teeth. It perforates the wallpaper. Just roll it around to punch little holes in the stubborn areas.

2) DIF. I prefer the Gel formula. Follow the instructions on the spray bottle. Be patient, try to soak the area and do a good job with the perforator so the DIF can get to the glue.

I had UGLY wallpaper border in my house that was just a (*&(*^ to get off. The above is the only thing that worked. Steamer didn't.

Tim

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LwnmwnMan2, I'd agree with TimR. Unless you're stripping it off of horsehair plaster walls. I started trying to strip my (horsehair plaster) walls soon found that taking plaster and paper at once and sheetrocking was the way to go. Is it an OLD house? If not, it's probably not horsehair plastered. Phred52

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I've ripped multiple layers off of plaster walls. You can do it without wrecking the plaster, but it is tedious. I used a fabric softener/water mix in a lawn sprayer instead of the DIF. That was gentle enough for the plaster. You just need to be careful enough with a putty knife that you do not knick the plaster when it is wet. The walls are not perfect in a century old house, but a skim coat of plaster will cover a multitude of sins!

If your house is newer, go the route mentioned above with the DIF after using the paper tiger.

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The wallpaper is about 25 years old.

My biggest issue right now is trying to get the 6-12" diameter areas of glue off.

Tomorrow I'll run to Wal-Mart and get some DIF.

We've tried that in the past, on other rooms, but we couldn't get decent results with it.

Maybe that's what'll work on these areas of glue.

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I used the DIF and spiked roller deal too. Warm, soapy water with a sponge worked the best. Soak it down and then use a paint scraper. Done deal.

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